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Discussion Starter #1
I've just bought my Dad's gorgeous Christopher Ward C60 Trident-Pro (with Khaki bezel) from him for £275, a watch that he paid £415 for originally. It's in nice condition and considering I know my Dad looks after his stuff well I think I got a pretty good deal on it.

It's a really nice watch and I'll try and get some pics up soon. |>

Anyway, it got me curious - how many of you have dealt in watches with your family members? b-)
 

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I've just bought my Dad's gorgeous Christopher Ward C60 Trident-Pro (with Khaki bezel) from him for £275, a watch that he paid £415 for originally. It's in nice condition and considering I know my Dad looks after his stuff well I think I got a pretty good deal on it.

It's a really nice watch and I'll try and get some pics up soon. |>

Anyway, it got me curious - how many of you have dealt in watches with your family members? b-)
I don't buy and sell anything like watches with familiy members. I have given several watches to family members over the years. And I have been fortunate enough to receive a few as well. And I've inherited a couple.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't buy and sell anything like watches with familiy members. I have given several watches to family members over the years. And I have been fortunate enough to receive a few as well. And I've inherited a couple.
That would certainly seem to be the norm. Which is why I thought this would be an interesting question to ask. ;-)

My Dad's given me two cheaper watches of his (one of which was very special to him, and therefore very special to me), but in this case he wanted to buy one of the more expensive of the Citizen Eco-Drive line of watches, knew I liked his Christopher Ward watch - which has been his daily wearer up until now - and so asked if I was interested in buying it so he could put the funds towards his new watch. He decided his new Citizen would be his daily wearer and that he no longer had much use for the CW. Which seems kind of mad to me but I've ended up with an amazing watch at a great price so I'm not complaining!

I love this CW so much I couldn't resist!

And hey, I DID negotiate! :-d
 

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To start with I'd have to be on speaking terms with my side of the family. And knowing them as I do they'd have to pay in cash. Oh yeah, and I think most would have to make parole first...

So I guess the answer is none to date, none ever.
 
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How do you mean?
I don't want to piss in your cornflakes, you are happy with the deal so I guess that's all that is important.

I just couldn't see asking my son to pay for a watch from me. I have gave him a Citizen Eco-Drive Perp Calendar, also a Panerai and an IWC co-pilot. If he ever has a son I will take back the SS co-pilot and have it cleaned...give the co-pilot (son) to his son and give him my Platinum Big Pilot (father). There is a BNIB SS Rolex Daytona in my safe waiting for him to graduate high school.



I'd have to be on speaking terms with my side of the family first, and then they'd have to pay in cash and that ain't gonna happen. Oh yeah, and I think they'd have to make parole first...

So I guess the answer is none to date, none ever.
LOL. :-d
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I don't want to piss in your cornflakes, you are happy with the deal so I guess that's all that is important.

I just couldn't see asking my son to pay for a watch from me. I have gave him a Citizen Eco-Drive Perp Calendar, also a Panerai and an IWC co-pilot. If he ever has a son I will take back the SS co-pilot and have it cleaned...give the co-pilot (son) to his son and give him my Platinum Big Pilot (father). There is a BNIB SS Rolex Daytona in my safe waiting for him to graduate high school.
Fair enough. I don't wish to piss in yours either when I say this, but; I can't see giving a family member something as a gift and then 'taking it back.'

I mean, look, I'm sure you weren't trying to be offensive, but unless you know the people you're talking about I'm not sure you should make comments like that. My Dad has done more for me in my life and been more generous & supportive than I could have ever expected or wished for, and is genuinely one of the best fathers in the world, and maybe I just didn't word it right or something, but he really didn't "ask me to pay for a watch from him" - I said I'd always liked and always wanted the watch and he was always aware of this. He said he'd be willing to sell it to me which would allow him to get the new Citizen I knew he wanted - money is tight at the moment. This way we both benefit. I get a brilliant watch at a brilliant price - he gets his new Citizen without having to wait any longer.

In a way I've done him a favour, and I have no qualms about that. It's the very least I could do after everything he's done for me.

When I said in the OP that "he no longer had much use for the CW", I didn't mean he no longer wanted the watch - he loved it too and he certainly would have liked to have kept it and bought the Citizen in addition, I'm sure - I just meant he had no use for it as far as wearing it every day, since that is what the new Citizen would be used for.

Hopefully that clears things up a little. Peace.
 

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I can't see giving a family member something as a gift and then 'taking it back.'
I would not be taking it back without his OK...and I would be taking the SS little pilot (watch on right) and giving it to his son, and giving him the Platinum BP (watch on the left). A sort of family bonding/tradition type thing for a new father and son. The watches were a special Father and Son set.



I don't see how that could be considered anything but a plus plus for him, however if he feels otherwise I would certainly not push it. All of my watches are to be left to my son and I'm sure that there will be some that I would like to see him have while I'm still alive.



But as I said previously...you are happy with the deal so I guess that's all that is important.


Cheers,
Rob
 

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I cannot imagine ever "buying" anything from my parents, nor ever selling them anything either. Even more distasteful imagining selling my children something like a watch, or other keepsake.

Over the years have given my father more fishing gear than is imaginable. Bought my parents a car last year, helped them with a second home so they can be near the grandkids. Haven't paid them back 1% of what they have done for me over my life. Not even close.

So, to answer your original question, no, I have neither purchased nor sold a family member a watch. If I were not in a position to give it away freely and as a gift or token of appreciation, then I simply wouldn't give it away at all, no harm nor shame in that.

Gotta say, kind of a weird topic.

Dan
 

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I would not be taking it back without his OK...and I would be taking the SS little pilot (watch on right) and giving it to his son, and giving him the Platinum BP (watch on the left). A sort of family bonding/tradition type thing for a new father and son. The watches were a special Father and Son set.

[/B]Cheers,
Rob
What if your son, in turn, has more than one son. That second son, your second grandson, will feel kinda shafted not getting something with the same emotional significance. Sorry to play Debbie Downer here, but since I now have two boys, I think about these kind of things.
 

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I think there's a difference between engaging in arms-length commercial transactions with family and a few different things that might be going on here.

First, a parent might want to teach their child the value of money or hard work. Rather than giving them something, they might tell them to save up for it so that they could then buy it from the parents. Or alternatively, the parent could buy it for the kid, and tell him, "Now, you have to pay me back." This kind of thing is actually a pretty good lesson for kids.

Second, parents and children might engage in favored-terms transactions. This doesn't happen much with watches, but I think it's much more regular with family homes. Parents might sell an old home to children on very favorable (i.e., sub-market-value) terms, but they wouldn't just give the home away, especially if they needed the money to move into a smaller place or handle their own living arrangements. I guess you could just restructure it as a more elaborate gift exchange as well (parents gift house, child gifts money for new house), but is there really that much of a difference? I think as long as the parties aren't negotiating and really trying to take advantage of one another to the utmost, this is all well and good.

I cannot imagine ever "buying" anything from my parents, nor ever selling them anything either. Even more distasteful imagining selling my children something like a watch, or other keepsake.

Over the years have given my father more fishing gear than is imaginable. Bought my parents a car last year, helped them with a second home so they can be near the grandkids. Haven't paid them back 1% of what they have done for me over my life. Not even close.

So, to answer your original question, no, I have neither purchased nor sold a family member a watch. If I were not in a position to give it away freely and as a gift or token of appreciation, then I simply wouldn't give it away at all, no harm nor shame in that.

Gotta say, kind of a weird topic.

Dan
 

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What if your son, in turn, has more than one son. That second son, your second grandson, will feel kinda shafted not getting something with the same emotional significance. Sorry to play Debbie Downer here, but since I now have two boys, I think about these kind of things.
I could also buy a similar watch for the second if and when. Nobody needs to get shafted. :-!
 

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I think as long as the parties aren't negotiating and really trying to take advantage of one another to the utmost, this is all well and good.
...and clearly that is not what's going on with the OP...he and his dad are both happy with the arrangement...I should have kept to myself but the questions were asked.
 

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Sorry, in reading the following posts, maybe I misunderstood the initial query, though I still would stay FAR away from such a transaction with family or close friends.

What if the watch breaks after a week? What if the watch is suddenly available online for 60% off? These are just a few of the sticky issues that could occur in familial transactions, best to avoid for all parties involved IMO.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I cannot imagine ever "buying" anything from my parents, nor ever selling them anything either. Even more distasteful imagining selling my children something like a watch, or other keepsake.

Over the years have given my father more fishing gear than is imaginable. Bought my parents a car last year, helped them with a second home so they can be near the grandkids. Haven't paid them back 1% of what they have done for me over my life. Not even close.

So, to answer your original question, no, I have neither purchased nor sold a family member a watch. If I were not in a position to give it away freely and as a gift or token of appreciation, then I simply wouldn't give it away at all, no harm nor shame in that.

Gotta say, kind of a weird topic.

Dan
I really don't think it's weird at all, and am honestly kind of surprised at some of these reactions.

Why should my Dad just give me one of his things for free just because I want it? He couldn't afford to just give me the watch for nothing. I wanted the watch. Therefore I should have to pay for it, right?

I mean, it strikes me as being sort of like this; say some parents have an adult kid still living at home. Should that kid have to pay his or her way, or at least contribute to the household in some way if he or she wishes to remain living there? Or get a free ride just because it's their parents' house they're staying at?

Conversely, should I get an expensive watch for nothing just because it belongs to one of my parents?

Probably not the best example, but hopefully you'll see what I'm trying to get at here.

If my Dad had just given me yet another one of his watches for nothing, especially when I knew he was saving for another to replace it, and especially one so expensive, and considering it wasn't a birthday or Christmas present or some other special occasion, or explicitly being given as a gift or handed down as an heirloom, I'd actually feel rather guilty taking it off his hands for nothing, with or without his blessing. I'd rather pay for it. I think he'd feel a similar way if I had something he wanted that I really wasn't in a position to just give away for nothing.

I don't think that's weird. I think it's noble and considerate if anything. Just the proper thing to do.
 

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Well, I never once bought or sold watches to and from family members. I've given my dad watches as gifts over time, and he was more than willing to give me his old Citizen (a watch that started my watch lust) until he found out that I eventually bought the exact same model. I've also given watches to two cousins as gifts, and one of them actually wears and uses the watches I gave him.

Once, I did receive a watch as a gift on the forum here. Continuing the gift giving, I gave it to a cousin who said he liked the way it looked. A couple of days later, I found out from his brother (the good cousin who wears the watches) that he sold the watch on ebay o|
 

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Discussion Starter #19
...and clearly that is not what's going on with the OP...he and his dad are both happy with the arrangement...I should have kept to myself but the questions were asked.
That 'negotiation' part in my OP wasn't really meant in seriousness. My Dad and I jokingly haggled like £5 either way - you know, just for fun. I thought the smiley would be a good indication I didn't mean that part entirely seriously. I possibly wasn't clear enough there.
 
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