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How much daily error can you handle? (Mechanicals)

  • HAQ all the way baby, mechanicals suck

    Votes: 3 4.5%
  • Superlative -2/+2

    Votes: 5 7.5%
  • Omega METAS 0/+5

    Votes: 2 3.0%
  • COSC -4/+6

    Votes: 24 35.8%
  • ~20s is cool

    Votes: 23 34.3%
  • I can live with ~40s

    Votes: 5 7.5%
  • Sure what's a minute in a day?

    Votes: 5 7.5%

  • Total voters
    67
  • Poll closed .
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Discussion Starter #1
It's generally acknowledged that most of us on the forum prefer mechanical over quartz for reasons discussed and explored in great detail on other threads. Typically reasons of perceived complexity; all those tiny assembled parts working in harmony, romance and a connection with something 'craftsmanly' and with a noble heritage.

We all recognise the general inferiority of mechanical movements in terms of timekeeping accuracy; we accept that our $,000 watches aren't going to be quite as good at their basic timekeeping function as a $20 quartz and we're happy to live with that. We sacrifice outright accuracy for all the other tangible and intangible benefits that we see in a mechanical.

I have 3 mechanicals; An Omega Plant Ocean with the 8900 movement that is a fairly consistent ~+1.5s/day; a SpeedyPro which amazes me with a similar performance; and a Mühle Glashutte Teutonia II which is ~+7s. The two Omega's are, to my mind, excellently accurate and clearly within any of the recognised accuracy parameters (COSC etc.). The Mühle with its modified Sellita is at the upper end of my accuracy comfort zone. I think more than 10s out in a day (excepting real vintage pieces) would feel like real underperformance to me. 10s a day would be more than a minute out in a week and, while it might be a bit pedantic, I feel if my watch is showing the wrong minute then it's not really telling me the time properly.

I've just found myself on the HELM website looking at some watches after following another thread and they're pretty nice. I like the Vanatu but reading over the spec I noticed the accuracy: "-20 ~ +40 seconds per day". If I'm doing my sums right that's potentially -2 mins 20s or +6 mins 40s in a week. I realise that the Vanatu is a $275 unit so I wouldn't expect the performance to be COSC but that level of inaccuracy would drive my OCD over the edge in half a day! I'm not knocking the watch per se as we all pay our money and make our choice and we'll all have different priorities and values; it's just that that error potential would rule it out for me.

Made me wonder, how important is this to others? What's your accuracy 'tipping point'?
 

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If it was >5s off a day, I would flip it.
 

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Those specs are ranges and not coordinates/points because they are not accurate - they are ideas. Companies use them to market their wares (within COSC specs) or use them to minimize performance/accuracy issues (Seiko's 7s26 is about +/- 200secs daily...obviously I'm exaggerating).

The question for me, is not how much deviation can I handle, but how that deviation affects my day. I still use a watch to tell time and date. I have yet to see any amount of "normal" deviation that adversely affects my day. Hence, I can handle Seiko's 7s26 movement with its daily +/- 300secs.

I learned to not sweat the small stuff. Others may not see things that way.
 

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I'm not a timing freak but I guess I would prefer my watches to run within COSC.

It actually annoys me more to know my watch is way off than it being way off, if that makes any sense.
 

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Up to +10, +15 is fine by me. - is a bit tighter, because it becomes more inconvenient to "fix", so approx. -5 or so.

It's actually also cost-agnostic for me... I don't really care if I paid £100 or £1000 for it - if it's within the limit, it's OK for daily wearing, if not, then it isn't...
 
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I could live with +/-10, but would prefer COSC.
 

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Don't get into a twist over accuracy ratings. Movements typically rate themselves conservatively so that under worst possible conditions, they'll still be performing within rating.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Fair comment yankeexpress, I wanted the choices to give enough choice without turning it into a huge list. You're right that a 10s would have made sense but I'm not seeing any way to edit the poll now.
 

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Buy plenty of watches without minute markers and 'poof'...problem solved!


Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

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All about expectations for me.

The Bulova Moonwatch would be out for repair if it lost 30 seconds a year. Hold closer to 10 to 12 seconds. Winner.
My G-Shock gains 10 seconds a week, but whatever. Tolerable. Gets reset when over a minute off.
My tuning fork Accutron holds at 0 sec/day in the box and +2 sec/day on the wrist. Winner. Use the positional variance to get it where it needs to be within 5 seconds.
A 1949 Bulova and a 1961 Bulova are both about +30 sec/day. I'm never late and they rarely run long enough to add up into the 5 minute region.
A recent brand new Vostok diver has been keeping about +15 sec/day. Spec was -20/+60, so it meets spec. ;-) I'll re-set it once a week if continuously running.

The Moonwatch was designed for 20 sec/year. The Accutron was design for 2 sec/day. The Vostok was designed for -20/+60. Why be angry about something running and meeting spec?

When they don't meet spec, they get sent out for service. Except that G-Shock. It gets to live in its own little timezone because it's not worth swapping a whole new timing package. If it ran that slow, maybe.
 

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When I purchased a new Swiss chronograph in 1997, it bothered me a great deal that it was inaccurate by 45 seconds/day (can't remember now if it was plus or minus). AFTER regulation through the AD, it was still off by +6 seconds/day.

This did a lot to dampen my enthusiasm for that particular brand, and for Swiss mechanical watches in general. There isn't any point in talking about history or past accomplishments if the current product doesn't live up the the standards set by earlier models.
 

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I don't really start to think about it unless it's off by 20 secs/day. (+/- doesn't matter to me-off is off)
I generally use the one minute rule. If I have a watch that is 20 seconds slow I just set it a minute fast. I can now wear it for 6 days and still be within a minute of "atomic time"
That's good enough for me. Nothing I do hinges on one munute,either way. Reverse setting procedure for +20 secs. I generally swith watches every few days so it's all good.
 

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I rarely wear a particular watch for more than 3 days. So +/- 15 sec is no problem for me.
 

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I voted for ~20s. Ideally I would prefer it to be better, but the truth is that with one exception, I generally don't wear a watch for more than a day at a time so it really isn't a big deal for me.

The one watch I do wear for months at a time is generally only off by a second even after months. I assume if I checked it daily it would be up or down more, but if I set it to the second and then don't check again for a month it's still bang on. It makes me pretty happy to have this one, my others can be off by a lot more as they only get worn once in a while for a little variety.
 

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I selected COSC as that is closest to my unofficial standard of about +/- 10 sec. Expect my Breitlings and other COSC certified to hold the -4/+6 spec. though.
 
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