WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I recently started wearing an automatic watch. I am wondering how compunctious I should feel after accidentally exposing the watch to erratic arm movements or mild shocks: sometimes my motion can be very careless.

The watch in question is a Seiko 5 with a 7s26C movement, but my question is general.

Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
For me the general rule of thumb is, if it doesn't break your wrist, it won't break your watch.
Unless, of course, the shock occurs on the watch itself, like you slamming the watch onto a wall or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,054 Posts
Welcome to the forum!

I read that some Omega (or was it Balls?) were tested to 5000g though I don't know if that's an answer.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,819 Posts
I read that some Omega (or was it Balls?) were tested to 5000g though I don't know if that's an answer.
Naw, that sounds more like a load of balls :)

Such a variable thing - depends in which plane you're talking about - i.e. edge on, base on or anything in between these two extremes

Also, for me, depends on the value of the watch :)
Generally I remove my watch (regardless) if I'm doing something energetic like work lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
423 Posts
The pics are on my wife's iPhone...

or I'd post one but last month my family went to a carnival. My little boy asked me to win him a prize by ringing a bell with the circus sledgehammer. I was wearing one of my GPs and took three big swings. The watch was fine and my son got his prize. Most watches are a lot tougher than you'd think, especially if you don't get a mental about keeping them perfectly new looking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,771 Posts
Most shock resistant systems are designed to prevent damage to a watch that is dropped 1 meter onto a hardwood surface. Govern yourself accordingly.
Watches like G-Shock can take considerably higher impacts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
I recently found out that F.Piguet based 1185 chronograph movement in my VC didn't like being dropped from just below my waist height (probably about 1 meter). A watch that worked perfectly till the moment of being dropped, after the incident I noticed few changes that would indicate some serious damage.

It took me few days to realise that power reserve went down from about 42 hours to about 20. Turning the crown no longer wound the watch and the watch was losing about 5 minutes per day. Mind you, this movement has over 180 parts in it and being dropped on hard wooden floor definitely isn't favourable..


Seikos do make some very sturdy mechanical movements - although I have very little knowledge on the specific movement you have.

But ideally, you wouldn't want to apply too much shock / vibrations to your automatic watches. Especially if that shock or vibration is applied consistently over a period of time. i.e jackhammering.

Leave those things for watches like G-Shocks. Their watches (certainly the new models with tough movement) get tested for shock and vibration resistance as well as gravity resistance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,024 Posts
Ball claim 5000G on many of their models, and has developed a new system called SpringLOCK that withstood Eric Singer of Kiss playing a concert.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,226 Posts
A surprisingly shocking amount.
 
  • Like
Reactions: npulaski

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
I have a older Seiko (1994) 200m divers (SKX-007) with the 7s26-0020 movement that I wear doing things that I would not do with some of my more expensive watches. It is basically my "beater" automatic watch, not like my older G-Shock or my Luminox but I certainly don't baby the Seiko and the movement has never been damaged. I have it serviced every 5 to 6 years and no parts have been replaced, it keeps good time still (+/- 5 spd). Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
In my experience little bumps here and there are fine. It appears that bigger shocks like dropping it are what causes the damage.

I ride motorcycles and go offroading with my automatics and have not had any issues. But I dropped a Hamilton from less than 1 meter onto a tile floor and it started losing about 2 minutes a day.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,317 Posts
Remember that our arms and bodies are gooey and damp high-frequency transients and vibrations. That is a watch's best protection. the Speedmaster shock test by NASA subjected it to six 40g shocks for 11ms each, and it had Incabloc-style shock protection just like we use now. Thats an extreme, to be sure. On our wrist, we'd have to hammer our arm against a hard surface hard enough to hurt like hell to duplicate that.

Shock systems were invented to protect the super-thin balance staff in case the watch is dropped when it is not on our arm. Before that invention, broken balance staffs were a common malady. Shock protection nearly completely eliminated that problem, and you rarely hear of it.

Construction workers wore watches before the quartz revolution, and they survived. I take mine off before hammering things like nails and golf balls out of an abundance of caution, but dropping it after taking it off poses a far greater risk.

Rick "who worries more about the crystal" Denney
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,501 Posts
Enough that you shouldn't even worry about it unless you really drop it from a height on a hard surface or totally clobber it. Even if you do this there is still a good chance it will be fine. Really, they are a lot tougher than we give them credit for, but it just makes sense to be somewhat careful and avoid unnecessary risk when possible.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
63,255 Posts
Modern auto watches are not the delicate creatures they were of old (I mean OLD) They seem to be fairly safe while you are wearing them but are most at risk off the wrist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
Welcome to the forum!

I read that some Omega (or was it Balls?) were tested to 5000g though I don't know if that's an answer.
5,000 Gs actually sounds reasonable, as 500Gs is experienced on a watch during tennis, and 1,000Gs is experienced on a watch when it hits a wall / door, at least according to this documentary (at the end): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IAkwCDXEqiY
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
I've crashed while skiing a couple of times with my Seiko 5 on, and it still works fine.

I don't think you have to worry about any erratic arm movements, unless you happen to smash the watch itself into a hard surface.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,819 Posts
5,000 Gs actually sounds reasonable, as 500Gs is experienced on a watch during tennis, and 1,000Gs is experienced on a watch when it hits a wall / door, at least according to this documentary (at the end)
Thing is the test is 5000G or 7500G (for one of their models for that manufacturer) and that G load is for programmed fractions of a millisecond, done on a pendulum test rig.

It doesn't emulate real life accidents.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top