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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a 1958 Omega Seamaster and really love it. However, it seems to lose several minutes a day. I was wondering if that's normal or should I have it looked at.

Thanks!
 

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Hi there,


I would say a serviced and regulated vintage omega should be able to keep time within 1 minute (+/-) over 24 hours... if not better! That said, it does also depend on use/storage of the watch.

Is the watch Auto or Handwind?

I note your collection (signature) lists 3 modern watches and this Omega! The watch will never (unlikely) keep the same time as these.... but should be able to keep better time than 'lose several minutes a day'....

Do you know when the watch was last serviced?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's an automatic and I keep it in a winder. It could be that the winder needs to turn more often....
I just bought the watch from a watchmaker. I'm assuming he just serviced it before selling but I'm not sure. I've emailed him asking about the time loss but he hasn't responded....:-s
 

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Wait to see what he has to say. That rate is unacceptable and you should expect fairly good to great timekeeping from this piece. Sounds like it wasn't serviced and/or regulated as assumed. My vintage watches keep great time.
 

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Hi there,

If you keep the watch in winder, it should be constantly wound and keeping better time! It really depends on what the watch maker did to the watch... service or not? also, the condition the watch arrived to the watchmaker in. He may have cleaned/serviced the watch.... but if the watch had not been serviced for 50 years previous to that, some of the parts may have wear, mainspring may not be as efficient as it once was, etc.... meaning the watch is not going to run 100%

Do you have any pics of the movement? Also, what do you mean by 'several minutes'..... 2 - 3mins? If I was selling a watch with that difference, I would still class that as keeping good time - but would say within 2 to 3 mins! That said, if I had just had the watch serviced, I would expect it to keep better time than that!

I would keep pestering your watchmaker and see what he says....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here is a picture of the movement from the seller:

Product Electronics Fashion accessory Auto part Metal


This is the description from the sale:

Stunning Omega Seamaster Automatic men's watch. Full size 34 mm stainless steel case is in excellent condition. Brilliantly restored original dial in two-tone silver using original large applied silver dagger hour markers and new Swiss made silver dagger hands. I personally serviced this impressive calibre 501, 17 jewel rotor automatic and it is running strong and keeping time well. Serial number 16241831 dates this watch to 1958. This stunning Seamaster is loaded with Omega style.

New optical grade acrylic crystal, gasket and new signed Omega crown.
Signed 6 times: case 2x, dial, crown, buckle and movement.


Looks like he did service it. I'm going to check how many minutes it loses today when I put it on the winder with the winder rolling more frequently.
 

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Watches of this vintage really shouldn't be kept on a winder, as it may cause excessive wear of the parts. In any case, are you giving sufficient power to the mainspring beforehand by winding it at least 30 times? One should do that with any automatic watch before use. Thence it should maintain power reserve from wrist motion. Test it by wearing it for a few days, not by putting it on a winder.
 

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With vintages we have to accept some error. Usually they don't have the performance expected from a brand new quality watch. But an Omega properly serviced doesn't loose/ gain 'minutes/ day'. I own several vintage Omegas dated from 1939 to 1977 keeping good time, which to me, means less than 20-30s/ day and generally much better than that. Just my opinion. Please, keep us informed.
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I just bought a 1958 Omega Seamaster and really love it. However, it seems to lose several minutes a day. I was wondering if that's normal or should I have it looked at. Thanks!
Abnormal

Hi there, I would say a serviced and regulated vintage omega should be able to keep time within 1 minute (+/-) over 24 hours... if not better! . . . . . .
The worst should and usually does sort out for me to less than 30 seconds - at least in the dial up or down position.

. . . . . . I've emailed him asking about the time loss but he hasn't responded....:-s
Perhaps a little patience, I know of no watchmaker that would be satisified this performance.

. . . . . . Sounds like it wasn't serviced and/or regulated as assumed. . . . . . . .
Only speculation, but I suspect it ran much better on the bench for the watchmaker.

. . . . . . If I was selling a watch with that difference, I would still class that as keeping good time - but would say within 2 to 3 mins! . . . . . . .
Good to know.

. . . . . . . Looks like he did service it. . . . . . . .
Looks like a fiber near the balance wheel. Hopefully removed before it was cased.

This 'family' of movements finds chronometers among it and this watch has a fine regulator. I would expect it to approach COSC standards.

p
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Abnormal



The worst should and usually does sort out for me to less than 30 seconds - at least in the dial up or down position.



Perhaps a little patience, I know of no watchmaker that would be satisified this performance.



Only speculation, but I suspect it ran much better on the bench for the watchmaker.



Good to know.



Looks like a fiber near the balance wheel. Hopefully removed before it was cased.

This 'family' of movements finds chronometers among it and this watch has a fine regulator. I would expect it to approach COSC standards.

p
Thanks!
 
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