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I think I am poor by the forum standards then. :)

There is no point in spending 400 bucks for servicing when the watch is not at least 10K in cost. Now I understand the success of Timex.
While I'm not sure Oscar Wilde was a watch aficionado, I still think he would take exception to your narrow view on the worth of certain watches (for obvious reasons).

Go into any watchmaker's workroom and you will see them repairing watches that are "worth" less than the cost of the overhaul. That's because there is much more to the value of a watch than what it's worth in a sale. Watches don't just mark time. They record memories. Wearing a watch in times that can never be repeated makes them a witness to our own lives. A watch that has "been in the trenches" with you is a boon companion, jogging your memory of adventures endured and pleasures enjoyed with every dent and scratch.

Recently I had my very first watch - a Croton Aquamatic acquired on my ninth birthday - serviced. The watch is worth very little as 58-year-old watches go, and the overhaul was not cheap. But it was a very small price to pay to have a watch I wore daily for the next eight years, and have kept safe in the many years since, restored to prime working condition.

There are others on this forum who feel as you do; that an overhaul of a watch should be a small fraction of its actual value. But thank heavens that is a minority view, not just here on WUS, but everywhere I've ever been.
 

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My question is, how can you tell when a problem appears with, say, a three handed watch. Just if it starts losing/gaining a significant amount of time? Or something more serious?
 

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Discussion Starter · #145 ·
My question is, how can you tell when a problem appears with, say, a three handed watch. Just if it starts losing/gaining a significant amount of time? Or something more serious?
Timekeeping is not a reliable indicator of the need for service - I define the need for service as when the lubrication has failed and parts are now wearing out.

A watch that shows a dramatic change in timekeeping, or power reserve, or shows some other fault may very well be in need for servicing. However the absence of such symptoms doesn't mean that everything is still okay inside. Sometimes you have to judge when service is needed based on the time since the last service and how the watch has been used.

Cheers, Al
 

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I just had my 1991 automatic Omega Seamaster serviced for the second time. $550 for the complete overhaul from Omega, which includes cosmetic work on the case, dial, hands, bracelet in addition to working on the movement. The watch is worth more than that service cost, but not by a huge amount. But it is a sentimental piece that I plan to hand down.

Omega recommends 5 years. I probably went 6-7 years before the first service and the watch operated with no problems. Stretched it out a lot longer the second time. By the time of the second service, there was a big drop off in the power reserve and in the timekeeping. So it was clearly overdue. Watch was worn 24/7/365. Never had a problem with the WR.
 

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While quite expensive, the Omega service is worth it for a piece you want to keep for decades.

It's like getting an almost new watch.

If you just want the movement serviced, I'm sure there's much less inexpensive ways to go.
 

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Man, I just sent one of mine off & was quoted $675 for the service. I sent my other Planet Ocean off in 2016 & that was $550 for the full factory service. Both were working fine, but noticeable drops in the power reserve. 7-10 weeks until it returns...
 

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I am new to watches and I wanted to thank everyone. This thread has been very thought provoking. I have an Omega Aqua Terra with the 8500 movement that I think is about 7 years hold. I wear it almost everyday and it is keeping great time, about +1 seconds per day. I was hesitant to send it in for service as I am very happy with its performance and I didn't want to get it back at -6 seconds per day which would still be within COSC. But after reading this thread I think it would be wise to take the move proactive approach and send the watch in for service. I think I am going to skip re-finishing though. The little scratches are my scratches and I know that it will just get scratched again soon after getting it back. I don't think it is worth the material loss. I will probably have the re-finishing done on the next service after this one.

Thanks everyone, especially Archer!
 

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This has been an interesting read. How often should I have my watch serviced?

It’s difficult to put a blanket time schedule when a given model could have been serviced 2 years prior by the official service centre and look in poor shape. Yet an identical model serviced 5 years ago can look fine.

I would never say it should be fine for 5 or 10 years.

I prefer to recommend that the watch is checked at 2-3 years depending on availability of parts. It is better for the watch in the long run.

Regards
Craig
 

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I am a newish watch wearing guy. Let's say my knowledge can only improve.
My question is a cross forum type and not Omega specific but you all seem smart.
Do "innovations" such as argon gas filled watchcases and copper sulfate drying capsules affect the service interval.

Very interesting that this thread is 6 years old but never really needed to be revived due to continued interest!
 

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Discussion Starter · #152 ·
Do "innovations" such as argon gas filled watchcases and copper sulfate drying capsules affect the service interval.

The short answer is no. I am a Sinn fan and have owned one, and serviced many. They are no different than any other watch in terms of their service lifespan.

If a company really did develop a watch that could go significantly longer than the typical service interval, they would be shouting it from the rooftops, and including that information in every advert they made. I just checked the Sinn website, and I can't see a place where they even talk about a recommended service interval, let alone brag about hw long it might be...

That should tell you enough about such "innovations" with regards to service intervals.

Cheers, Al
 

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Thank you for the honest reply.
Today even bottled water is advertised as new and improved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #155 ·
Do you find that watches with complications (i.e. chronographs) require service more frequently? Even if modem calibers.
Certainly with a more complex movement there's more opportunity for something to go wrong, and that may require attention where a simpler watch may not. But from a pure service interval standpoint, the answer is no.

Cheers, Al
 

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The short answer is no. I am a Sinn fan and have owned one, and serviced many.
Slightly off-topic, but does Sinn provide you with access to parts, etc., as an independent watch maker? For example, if you needed a new crystal could you get one? Or is it just that since they use standard ETA movements, etc., you have access to the parts you need for the movement but not any Sinn-specific parts? I have a ~12 year old 856 which I am thinking about sending in for service soon(ish)...
 
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