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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So how is it done...surprisingly can't find the answer on google? My question all boils down to: is the watch supposed to be at all visible unless you're checking the time?

-Does the whole shirt sleeve/cuff go over the watch, or does the cuff tuck under the edge of the casing (and the bottom of the cuff goes over the band)?

Does anything change depending on if you have a suit jacket on with it?

Thanks!
 

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You need to make sure that your shirt and jacket are altered/tailored properly. The watch is worn normally...nothing special there...but the shirt cuffs should cover the watch if you are standing with your arms to your side. When extending your arm/reaching out your watch should show a bit. Make sure you have a dress watch on...normally a low profile watch on a leather strap...so that your cuffs can go up and down your arm smoothly. Do not tuck the cuff under the watch...ever.

Again...there is nothing special about wearing the watch...it's about having the right fit and any competent tailor should be able to take care of that for you.
 

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You need to make sure that your shirt and jacket are altered/tailored properly. The watch is worn normally...nothing special there...but the shirt cuffs should cover the watch if you are standing with your arms to your side. When extending your arm/reaching out your watch should show a bit. Make sure you have a dress watch on...normally a low profile watch on a leather strap...so that your cuffs can go up and down your arm smoothly. Do not tuck the cuff under the watch...ever.

Again...there is nothing special about wearing the watch...it's about having the right fit and any competent tailor should be able to take care of that for you.
or one of these:

omega-speedmaster-planet-ocean-james-bond.jpg

James-Bond-Omega-Seamaster-Professional-300m1.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You need to make sure that your shirt and jacket are altered/tailored properly. The watch is worn normally...nothing special there...but the shirt cuffs should cover the watch if you are standing with your arms to your side. When extending your arm/reaching out your watch should show a bit. Make sure you have a dress watch on...normally a low profile watch on a leather strap...so that your cuffs can go up and down your arm smoothly. Do not tuck the cuff under the watch...ever.

Again...there is nothing special about wearing the watch...it's about having the right fit and any competent tailor should be able to take care of that for you.
Thanks, it's as I suspected. Since I'm 21 and only need the suit for interviewing, I went with a stainless metal watch since I felt leather or "dressy" looked a bit too pretentious for my age. I've always worn a watch...so I didn't just buy the watch because I needed the suit, but my Timex digital just wasn't working for me :)

My watch in question:



On my wrist it seems to work just as well with short sleeves or a suit. |>

Now I have to start figuring out the dynamics of buttoning a suit while standing up from a table and somehow managing to shake someone's hand at the same time. :think:
 

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Good luck with the interview. Nice Bulova btw.
 

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Neah, that is marketing not a dress watch.

A dress watch should be:
- as simple as possible, preferably white face
- matching leather strap preferred, with shoes, wallet, etc on the same leather or as close as possible. Imagine is not really ok to have croc shoes or something too loud.
- No luminova or very little quantity
- plain Gold/platinum/steel without rocks or anything too flashy

From there you can have complications within your budget, but when you want to look as business as possible skeleton dials are not ok.

Thats why Patek has the tourbillon on the back for example.

Breguet have some very nice dress watches, even the ones without a dial .. But ofcourse very expensive.

The best way is to look for a vintage solid gold from one of the big manufacturers. Service it, polish, new strap, and you will have your perfect dress watch at a reasonable price.
 

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Don't wear your watch on top of your sleeve ;-)
 

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Neah, that is marketing not a dress watch.

A dress watch should be:
- as simple as possible, preferably white face
- matching leather strap preferred, with shoes, wallet, etc on the same leather or as close as possible. Imagine is not really ok to have croc shoes or something too loud.
- No luminova or very little quantity
- plain Gold/platinum/steel without rocks or anything too flashy

From there you can have complications within your budget, but when you want to look as business as possible skeleton dials are not ok.

Thats why Patek has the tourbillon on the back for example.

Breguet have some very nice dress watches, even the ones without a dial .. But ofcourse very expensive.

The best way is to look for a vintage solid gold from one of the big manufacturers. Service it, polish, new strap, and you will have your perfect dress watch at a reasonable price.
Who made these rules?
 

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Best of luck on your interview. Depending on whether you will be wearing a suit to work, I'd consider getting a watch with a plainer dial.

I'm guessing the people who made up these watch rules are the same ones who made up the suit rules. You know, so everything matches. :)
 

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This is not something you really need to stress over too much, IMO. Yes, the cuff of your shirt will completely cover the watch, as your cuff should go the way to your wrist bones and even a little further for a french cuff. Don't believe watch ads (including product placement in movies). They obviously go way out of their way to get the watch to peek out from behind the cuff for a photo op. In reality, wearing a suit won't be the best opportunity to showcase your favorite watch.

As for which watch to wear, some people strictly define a dress watch as one with a leather strap. I agree that a leather strap is dressier than a similar watch with a metal bracelet, but you don't necessarily need the dressiest watch just like you don't necessarily need a cumberbund and tails. Personally, the only reason I always go with a leather strap when I have an occasion to wear a suit is because that is my only chance to wear my dress watch. I get to wear my metal watches whenever I want, but some of them could be worn nicely with a suit. With a business suit, you can even wear a stainless steel dive watch if the design is more on the elegant side (like a Rolex Submariner or an Omega Seamaster) rather than a "diver's tool" style, but certainly nothing with a rubber strap. Just make sure it fits under your cuff.

By the way, you certainly don't have to wear a fancy name brand like Rolex. I just used that example because I figured most people on this site knows what that looks like.
 

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Solid advice here. I would either go nice-looking diver, or VERY simple watch on leather strap (or stainless as long as the overall look of the watch is ok). Simple is better when it comes to a "pure" dress watch in my opinion. But the diver w/ suit does look nice sometimes.
 

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This is not something you really need to stress over too much, IMO. Yes, the cuff of your shirt will completely cover the watch, as your cuff should go the way to your wrist bones and even a little further for a french cuff. Don't believe watch ads (including product placement in movies). They obviously go way out of their way to get the watch to peek out from behind the cuff for a photo op. In reality, wearing a suit won't be the best opportunity to showcase your favorite watch.

As for which watch to wear, some people strictly define a dress watch as one with a leather strap. I agree that a leather strap is dressier than a similar watch with a metal bracelet, but you don't necessarily need the dressiest watch just like you don't necessarily need a cumberbund and tails. Personally, the only reason I always go with a leather strap when I have an occasion to wear a suit is because that is my only chance to wear my dress watch. I get to wear my metal watches whenever I want, but some of them could be worn nicely with a suit. With a business suit, you can even wear a stainless steel dive watch if the design is more on the elegant side (like a Rolex Submariner or an Omega Seamaster) rather than a "diver's tool" style, but certainly nothing with a rubber strap. Just make sure it fits under your cuff.

By the way, you certainly don't have to wear a fancy name brand like Rolex. I just used that example because I figured most people on this site knows what that looks like.
I'd say a smooth rubber strap would be more appropriate than steel; most people can't tell the difference between good rubber and leather unless they're up close. But you're also talking to someone whose collection doesn't include a watch appropriate with a suit, according to some.
 

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Wait, is this for an interview or for a job? If it's for an interview, just borrow a good dress watch from somebody. Simple, thin, smaller than 40mm, on leather that matches your shoes and belt. If it's for the job, who cares? You got the job. You're not going to get fired for having a bad watch.
 
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It doesn't matter...wear what you like.

Unless you plan on wearing a blinged out piece of crap that screams "look at me!" no one is going to notice what watch you are wearing.
 

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Thanks, it's as I suspected. Since I'm 21 and only need the suit for interviewing, I went with a stainless metal watch since I felt leather or "dressy" looked a bit too pretentious for my age. I've always worn a watch...so I didn't just buy the watch because I needed the suit, but my Timex digital just wasn't working for me :)

My watch in question:



On my wrist it seems to work just as well with short sleeves or a suit. |>

Now I have to start figuring out the dynamics of buttoning a suit while standing up from a table and somehow managing to shake someone's hand at the same time. :think:
Good luck with the interview. Now you need to make sure your tie knot has a dimple.
 
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