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I regularly use my watches in and under water, and I'd far rather have a 10-12mm diver. Despite a technical diving background, I don't need 300m WR.

And I'm glad you highlighted the downside (undue case thickness) of high WR.
Not always the case.

The core "Sub" dive watches by NTH have 300m WR and are 11.5mm thick.
The <40mm Breitling Superocean dive watches have 500m WR at 11.2mm thickness.
 

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Not always the case.

The core "Sub" dive watches by NTH have 300m WR and are 11.5mm thick.
The <40mm Breitling Superocean dive watches have 500m WR at 11.2mm thickness.
Isn't that discounting the crystal though? On the wrist they're thicker. I know for example Zelos tend to publish thickness sans crystal.
 

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I regularly use my watches in and under water, and I'd far rather have a 10-12mm diver. Despite a technical diving background, I don't need 300m WR.

And I'm glad you highlighted the downside (undue case thickness) of high WR.
And lots of other design compromises to hit 300 or 500m wr too - I wouldn't have been able to put in a sapphire crystal caseback if I wanted to get to 300m wr and while 11.4mm isn't super slim for a 200m wr case that's because with the height saving from a "lower" WR rating (I still consider it more than enough for the vast majority of people) I can use add 1mm to the dial (using a onyx/malachite dial) that might have made it a 12/13mm watch otherwise.

Adding WR isn't a design free decision - you will need to pay - and for most people the gains are absolutely negligible.

Similar to a car doing 500mph (the 200m wr watch) and another can do 750mph (300m wr watch) ...sure you're theoretically getting a car/watch that goes faster/deeper but in daily use almost no-one is going to notice it. The 3 or 5 atm watch would be a 90mph car - maybe sometimes you need faster but that will be exceedingly rare.

Crush depth of military submarines is around 400m.

And I'm a recreational diver too - the amount of scuba equipment that is rated to 50m wr may surprise watch lovers - because scuba equipment companies understand their customers aren't going to be saturation diving with normal gear. Why would you want to go beyond 30m anyway? Your no-deco time is limited to 20 minutes and generally the fun stuff is found in the first 12m...

Oh and no HEV on my watch either 😂
 

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Isn't that discounting the crystal though? On the wrist they're thicker.

EDIT: Nope, I stand corrected.
Check out the pre-bond Omega Seamaster - automatic winding and only around 9mm thick. For a long time the mark of a quality watch was seen by how thin it is.

Adding a sapphire crystal caseback to the Omega/NTH would have maybe added 1-2mm to height (instead of solid caseback) and while you can add sapphire casebacks to 500m (or 600m Planet Oceans 16.5mm) it's probably going to make it quite a bit thicker. Design compromises in one area or another... Depends if you have a watch movement you want to show off or not 😊
 

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Isn't that discounting the crystal though? On the wrist they're thicker. I know for example Zelos tend to publish thickness sans crystal.
I know the Breitlings are skinny because my FIL has a few and I've done a comparison.
Don't own one but thought the NTH Subs had flat crystals?
 

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How water resistent is the sarb035/33?
rated to 100m but I wouldn't go swimming with it personally

Then again I'd probably avoid going swimming with any watch 🤷‍♂️
 

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Contrary to urban myths, you can go into the water with a 100m watch and get it wet — you just can't dive with it.
Surprisingly you can do that too! And yes, that is a 30M WR Seiko 5 diving on a shipwreck. Survived 5 full day of two-a-day dives and narry a drop of water got in. Still running in (seiko) spec almost 5 years later.
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I'm on a Southwest flight Tuesday. This was a good reminder that I'll need to bring my pilot's watch....
I just got back from a business trip where I wore my Aqua Terra. Thankfully, neither Aqua nor Terra were unexpectedly encountered. I was a little worried when I saw the pilot wearing a dive watch and the copilot wearing a field watch.
 

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It will be fine while swimming, just don't wear it while rinsing off in the shower afterwards, that will kill it for sure!

Of course, unless you're an extreme trona miner, then all bets are off.
 

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Lol, that’s funny. I’m always more scared of the sand than the water
Absolutely - quartz/silica in the sand will be hard enough to scratch your stainless steel and especially titanium bands/cases. I prefer for brands like Omega/Tudor etc. to spend a little less on getting their WR up to 500/600m and maybe add some coatings to the SS pieces so it doesn't scratch as easily.

Useful things like improving shock protection, potentially anti-magnetic protection (dependant on what movement is used) and better anti-reflective coatings for the sapphire crystal than just putting a 1000m WR on the dial. Those things are harder to quantify though so for the average consumer of "bigger numbers are better" then a 1000m WR watch may seem impressive when the average watch wearer only "needs" 3 or 5 ATM.

You see it in watch publications too - "X watch is great but it only has 3ATM" - case in point the Bulgari Octo Finissimo - I appreciated it having 3ATM and the 5.15mm height - but it "only" has 3ATM so ultimately Bulgari released a 100m WR version with a 6.4mm height - personally I prefer having the extra 1.25mm shaved off the watch - 3ATM is enough to go swimming and showering with - I'm not taking the Octo diving...

Having said all that I can understand why some watch manufacturers will say you can't go swimming with a 3ATM watch - if water ingresses it will pretty much be 100% down to user error (as long as the manufacturer has told people not to pull out crowns/push pushers underwater) - but dealing with irate customers takes time and money and it's just easier to say to people don't swim with anything less than 200m WR...
 

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Unfortunately the Chinese have devalued the water rating on some watches by using it as a decoration, you will see say 100m inscribed on the caseback when the watch is their usual "3 ATM" on the spec sheet. However you don't see DIVER on their watches, although many are made to look like dive watches.

Here is an example, I purchased this watch as I had no illusions about its pressure rating and was more interested in its appearance, however there was no mention of 100m on its specification sheet presented in the on-line advert.
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Unfortunately the Chinese have devalued the water rating on some watches by using it as a decoration, you will see say 100m inscribed on the caseback when the watch is their usual "3 ATM" on the spec sheet. However you don't see DIVER on their watches, although many are made to look like dive watches.
Having "Diver's xxx M" on the dial should mean that the watch is ISO6425 rated - which is different to a normal watch's generic wr testing.

Iso 6425 contains more than just pure wr testing though - it's meant to be a true tool specification so need to test for shock, pressure changes, temperature and have features like a lumed moving second hand.

Many companies don't see the need for ISO 6425 ratings - you wouldn't find Patek or Rolex putting Diver's on their dials but I'm sure people can rely on Patek's word that their dive watches are tested extensively 😉

So no "Diver's xxx M" on the dial isn't an issue but having it on the dial should mean the company is adhering to the ISO rules on diving watches.

Btw you "only" need 100m to be eligble for a Diver's rating. But frankly it costs less to get it to 200m wr than to subject each watch to wr testing (part of the ISO requirement is that each cased watch is wr tested - no batch testing like with normal watches) - that inevitability costs time and thus money.
 

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Oh and sadly some Chinese companies have even put "DIVER'S" on a dial when the watch didn't undergo ISO 6425 compliant testing - that's really unfortunate I think - it's not decoration but actually a mark of assurance for someone who may (unlikely in today's world of dive computers perhaps) be using it as a key piece of life preserving equipment.
 
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