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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A few years ago, I hydrolyzed (oil filled) a Casio F-91W. On that occasion, I did not have silicone oil, and I used olive oil (virgin, yes) 馃構.



The watch worked (and works) perfectly (the bubble was not circular). I turned a Water-Resistant watch into one capable of going down to depths impossible for a human being.




And then I showed his underwater adventures in the Medes Islands.

Here you have a couple of photos, one with the F-91 at a depth of 41 meters.






Later, I saw that analogue clocks could also be hydrolyzed (obviously quartz, because the mechanism of an analogue clock does not work, flooded with oil).

A group of friends decided to buy silicone oil. The density must be the right one. After reading a lot, we figured that it had to be 50 CST. Denser, it would have avoided the hands from moving properly.

My friends have already hydrolyzed (most, successfully) several watches. On many occasions the MRW-200, a pretty economical watch. And very grateful to be immersed in oil, because its dial is spectacular.



I started with a vintage Casio. An MD-770.

Look at the difference in the visibility of the dial.

This photo is before hydrolyzing.



And this, after.



The watch was beautiful.



But the hands weren't moving properly. The watch stopped. Perhaps because the module was too old, and didn't have enough strength.

I didn't want my next attempt to fail for the same reason, and I wanted to buy a timepiece that was proven successful at hydrolyzing it.

The chosen one was the Casio MDV-106, the popular Casio Marlin. A watch that, no without being filled with oil, is already approved for 200 M, and has a screw-down crown (something I wanted, to ensure there were no leaks, at this point).

That watch is not available new, in Spain. I bought it from amazon.com (at a very good price).

It came with its original rubber strap.




After doing several tests, with other straps ...

Marine Militare blue




Black perlon




Black Zulu




Fake Bond Zulu




I decided to wear it with this black NATO seatbelt. A super-soft strap. And safe (loosening a pin does not mean you lose your watch), necessary for its underwater adventures. Also, long enough to be worn with the wetsuit.




But once I explained how the Casio was, before the operation, I'll explain the hydrolyzation process.

Before that, and even though the watch was new, I changed the battery, for reopening it as late as possible (when it is already full of oil).

I have not recorded the entire process on video, so as not to complicate the procedures. I preferred to be focused on what I was doing.

I have taken some photos.

The first, with the tools of the "operation".




Silicone oil, top. The watch (already open, and with the backplate, gasket, crown and plastic fixer outside), inside the box that I will fill with oil. Finally, I have not used the fattest syringe. With the fine and its needle, there was enough.

I have not shown the part of putting the oil inside, because it is the one that can be more sticky (although, the truth is, it has not gotten much dirty). It is about filling the entire watch with oil, and then the rest of the plastic box, until reaching a height that allows the cover to be put on, without allowing the air to enter.
I have entered the module in the most inclined way possible, to favour the air exit

Here, with the watch already full of oil, waiting to enter the crown and its stem. Before that, I had already moved the module as much as possible, and injected silicone oil with the syringe, through the holes, to make the air bubbles escape.



This Marlin has a bit more difficulty getting the bubbles out of the dial, as it has the "chapter ring" sticking out of the dial, and that traps the bubbles there. I removed it and tilted it quite a bit.

Here, with the stem already inside, about to insert it into the module. To put the stem in its place, it was the only time I used my fingers. With the tweezers I could not find the position, nor did I had the strength to apply enough pressure.



This is very important: The watch must be closed before fully tightening the crown (this crown is threaded, because without manipulating, it is already a 200m resistant watch). Otherwise, the oil pressure, when closing the cap, would prevent it from screwing in completely. Or it will get out somewhere else (for instance, through the cristal)



Here, with the gasket and the plastic back already in place. When putting on this piece, you also have to remove the watch and inject some oil again, as air bubbles are trapped again.



After putting the plastic back on, carefully put the backplate on. It was not easy for me to find the right point to screw. When I got it, with the tweezers and a tip, I reached the point where the oil pressure didn't allow me to press any more. Then, I used the jaxa.
After fully tightening the backplate, it was time to screw in the crown.

Once the crown was tightened, I turned it over, unscrewed the crown again, and verified that it worked perfectly; both in the first position of the rapid date change, and later, to set the time.

And, here it is. Already washed, after leaving the box with the silicone oil



This is the moment when your doubts are cleared up (because while you are doing the operation, you cannot see if there is anything left on the dial): Will all the air have come out? Will there be any bubbles left? Will they be big or small?

Well, at first, no bubbles were seen



As you can see, the visibility at very low angles (one of the main advantages of hydrolyzed watches) is spectacular.



And even with less angle. The dial seems to be glued to the glass.



Finally, after manipulating the watch for a while, a little air bubble did come out (it must have been trapped in a remote corner, because it had a long time getting out).

You can see it in this first photo on the wrist. At 12



I have to say that I think it's very good that this bubble has remained. It does not disturb visibility at all. It can help compensate for the slight expansion of the oil in warmer weather. And it helps to explain, to those who do not know the hydrolyzed watches, that this one is filled with oil. Just with the incredible improvement in visibility, it might not be understood.



Look here: the second-hand moves the bubble a little, when it coincides with it.



As I said, I have fitted this Marlin with a black NATO seatbelt (extremely soft and resistant). It will be with the strap that stays, almost always. Because, in addition to being very good, it is the perfect strap to take it diving



On the wrist, you can also appreciate the extreme visibility that hydrolyzation gives to analogue watches.



And even more inclined.



This is the "official" photo of this hydrolyzed Casio Marlin. You can see that it is the same as the one you saw at the beginning, with the black NATO seatbelt. As it is a front view of a watch, the visibility is similar. But, at minute 13, you can see the small bubble, which stays close to the second hand, a sign that it is already full of oil.




As you already know, hydrolyzing a watch, in addition to changes in the visibility of the dial, has the great advantage that, as it is already filled with liquid, it prevents the watch from being flooded with water. And that makes it submersible to depths impossible for humans to reach.


And, to this advantage of its almost unlimited water resistance, there is another advantage for a diver's watch (coupled with this change in visibility conditions): As the space between the crystal and the dial is filled with liquid (which is what which makes them appear almost stuck one to each other), the speed of transmission of light rays in oil is the same as in water (not like in conventional watches, where there is air between the glass and the dial). Therefore, the unwanted mirror effect of underwater watches, which makes them useless, does not occur if the viewing angle is not enough perpendicular to the glass.

I am going to show you this, graphically.

Here you have (out of the water) my Aqualand I, the watch that I wear diving. To its right, the Marlin, already full of oil. Visibility is good in both.



With a more tilted angle, it's good too, because we're still out of the water. In the Marlin, we already see that effect that has been seen before, of flattening of the dial towards the glass.

Now, they are both inside the water, in the sink. Visibility is still correct, because of the angle at which the Aqualand is still quite perpendicular. The Marlin is already very tilted, and it looks perfect.



However, take a look at what happens when the Citizen is tilted (even at a lower angle than the Casio is): The glass on it becomes a mirror, making it completely useless.



I think that this explains the two great advantages of hydrolyzing an analogue watch: not only increasing its water resistance, but also making it much more useful underwater (and more attractive outside of it).

My next goal is to hydrolyze this Timex Helix depth gauge, and turn it into an impossible to flood watch.



I am a little worried about the fact that it is a depth gauge, and that it has that multipurpose button/crown. Also, it is a watch for which there is no type of help on the internet (not like the Marlin, of which there are quite a few videos).

And finally, I would like to hydrolyze the Aqualand I that you have seen in the sink (the one that turned into a mirror). It is the watch that I wear when I go diving, and that backs up my dive computers.



That would make it the perfect diver's watch (in the absence of solar power, so that you don't have to change the battery; although I don't think it will very difficult to do so, even though it's full of oil, since you don't have to remove the module).

Well, I hope you liked this hydrolyzation. I intend to dive with this oiled Marlin this summer. I do not take pictures underwater, but I hope I will have the opportunity to dive with someone who does, to show you.
 

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That was a great read, thank you for sharing. This is something I've thought about doing but never worked up the necessary courage. Maybe one day.

Just one more thing, I imagine that by "needles" you meant "hands".
 

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One of the best write ups I have seen on WUS, and the difference in visibility is undeniable!
 

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Fascinating stuff. I'd never have the courage to do that myself, but what a cool project and post. Well done with the walk-through and images!
 

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Okay modding the F-91W with olive oil (and from Spain at that!) sounds so cool haha

The MRW-200H is a relatively popular watch to hydromod. The matte dial and the extra numbers on it make the effect really visible. Thought about modding mine, but couldn鈥檛 imagine how messy it would be to change the battery, but maybe one day!
 

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So, the crown or stem seals don鈥檛 leak when setting the time after you fill it with oil? Any leaks afterwards while using?Vance.
 
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Thanks.
How do you change the battery?
Does it affect the solar cell in a solar watch?
 

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You are amazing!

I had thought about getting the iol filled Sinn, not because I dive but as a curiosity item. Now I see that I can creat one myself from the Casio Quartz which will no doubt be more accurate.

Fantastic!
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
That was a great read, thank you for sharing. This is something I've thought about doing but never worked up the necessary courage. Maybe one day.

Just one more thing, I imagine that by "needles" you meant "hands".
It's not so difficult. 馃榾

Thank you for your correction.

Hands changed. (y)

Finishing the thread, late, at night, I made some english mistakes..... 馃
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Okay modding the F-91W with olive oil (and from Spain at that!) sounds so cool haha

The MRW-200H is a relatively popular watch to hydrolyze. The matte dial and the extra numbers on it make the effect really visible. Thought about modding mine, but couldn鈥檛 imagine how messy it would be to change the battery, but maybe one day!
Yes, the MRW-200 is a very good watch for hydrolyzing. Cheap, with different versions, and with a "busy" dial (excellent for the improved visibility). I didn't use it because I wanted a watch with a screwed crown, to avoid any possible oil leakage.

I hope that the battery change will not be so messy, because you don't have to mode the module again.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So, the crown or stem seals don鈥檛 leak when setting the time after you fill it with oil? Any leaks afterwards while using?Vance.
I've only moved the crown for setting the date and hour, and for screwing, while closing it (after filling the watch with oil).

I have not experienced any leakage through it. And I'm not expecting it.

The screwed crown was one of the reasons why I chose the Marlin for hydrolyzing.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks.
How do you change the battery?
Does it affect the solar cell in a solar watch?
You put the watch inside the hydrolyzing box, open it, change the battery and refill it a bit (in case some oil is lost). You don't need to move te module and repeat the whole process.

About the solar cells being affected by the oil, and don't think they will be, because the liquid is transparent.

You can see some examples (not many) of hydrolyzed solar watches, like this Citizen Ecodrive.

 

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Nice, damn air bubble.
 
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Discussion Starter #19
You are amazing!

I had thought about getting the iol filled Sinn, not because I dive but as a curiosity item. Now I see that I can create one myself from the Casio Quartz which will no doubt be more accurate.

Fantastic!
I don't think a Casio Quartz would be more accurate than a Sinn. UX Sinn watches are quartz (you can't hydrolyze a mechanical watch).

I love UX Sinn watches. One of my dreams is having one of those watches.



Sinn watches are not filled with silicone oil, but with Fluorinert. And they have a piston in the back case, to compensate for the possible expansion of the liquid, due to temperature changes. Of course, you must send them, for battery changes and servicing, to Germany.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
at first I was afraid you were going to fill that aqualand with oil... and I was going to be mad as a hornet...
Filling with oil my diving Aqualand is my final hydrolyzing objective. 馃槏

I don't know if I will ever do it.
 
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