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The serial number on the movement is the key to IDing your watch. With it we can tell approx. date of manufacture and type and grade.

A sharp close-up of the movement would be appreciated. Without that all we can say right now is that you have a Waltham hunter case watch.
 

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What RON in PA said.

If you know what you're doing, gently remove the caseback and if applicable the dust cover until you can see the movement. Write down every single marking you see on both the movement and the inside of the case, no matter how seemingly insignificant. Take an overall picture of both. There are very good records of Waltham movements and decent records for the casemakers they used.

I managed to find out everything about a family friend's heirloom Waltham by that method.

IF you're not comfortable opening it, take it to a local watch repairer. Ask them nicely to open it so you can look at the movement and take some notes/pictures. It would be good manners to then buy a token item like a strap for another watch you have at home to compensate for their time.
 

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Agreed. If you can't open it yourself, a jeweler will often help you out for free. Then upload some pictures.

And definitely don't run it! If if it starts ticking, the oils are are dry and crusty. It will only cause the watch the grind away on itself.
 

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Agreed. If you can't open it yourself, a jeweler will often help you out for free. Then upload some pictures.

And definitely don't run it! If if it starts ticking, the oils are are dry and crusty. It will only cause the watch the grind away on itself.
A watchmaker, never a jeweller!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What RON in PA said.

If you know what you're doing, gently remove the caseback and if applicable the dust cover until you can see the movement. Write down every single marking you see on both the movement and the inside of the case, no matter how seemingly insignificant. Take an overall picture of both. There are very good records of Waltham movements and decent records for the casemakers they used.

I managed to find out everything about a family friend's heirloom Waltham by that method.

IF you're not comfortable opening it, take it to a local watch repairer. Ask them nicely to open it so you can look at the movement and take some notes/pictures. It would be good manners to then buy a token item like a strap for another watch you have at home to compensate for their time.
Took a bit of effort, but I've managed to open it! I tried to take the photos with as much details possible. Also, some of you guys have told me that I should NOT run the watch because it might break. However, the reason I found it in the first place is because of the ticking noise that it makes while running. Is there any way for me to stop it?

Do you guys have any ideas about the engraving on the case? It looked pretty sophisticated for me so I'm wondering if it was handmade or not. Thanks for the help!
 

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Here you go:
https://pocketwatchdatabase.com/search/result/waltham/15537136/movement

The watch was running when you found it? Considering the power reserve - when fully serviced - would be around 40 hours or less, the only explanation I can think of is that it was partially wound and in the act of picking it up and jostling it around you set it in motion again. It will likely stop running within a few hours (or less). Just don't wind it up again until you bring it to a qualified watchmaker to have it serviced, assuming that is your intention.

I am not very well versed in pocket watches. The experts here can tell you much, much more. Beautiful watch, though. Best of luck!
 

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francis206...Ok, here we go: this Waltham was made circa 1907. It is what's called an "0 Size" movement, has 15 Jewels, and is a "Model 1907", in a nickle finish. It sports a Single-sunk Arabic dial, with blued steel spade hands. The case is yellow-gold filled, and was Warranteed not to wear through to the brass base metal for 25 years.

This is a good-quality Waltham. There were movements that were quite a bit above this in quality, and a number that were below it. It's interesting to note that Waltham--like many other makers--differentiated ( a number,although not all...) of their movements as a function of finish: the basic mechanism was the same,it's just that some components were more highly polished or otherwise embellished, than lower grades.

Oh: although your case is not solid gold, it is a bit unusual in that it's enamelled: the black accents on the covers were/ are filled with paint, and present a very nice contrast to the gold.

This Waltham is very easy to Service, and I expect that it will be in fine condition. Watches from this era frequently do need a new mainspring, which is readily available...the replacement will probably be Swiss, and of a steel alloy that most folks consider to be superior to the original. An easy fix! "NOT expensive...!"

Feel free to PM me with any questions. Michael.
 

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If you can't open it yourself, a jeweler will often help you out for free. Then upload some pictures.



WISE WORDS!!! I made that my new signature.
After I've seen cases of jewellers trying to service a Speedmaster by replacing the entire movement, or charging a grand for repairing a run-of-the-mill PW (and I don't think I've heard as much as one story of a jeweller actually servicing a watch properly), I don't think they should be let anywhere near a watch, unless it needs fixing a hinge or a lug.
 
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