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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
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I bought this Timex "Q" for $5.00. It runs great and keeps time. The dial, crystal, and bezel look fine, but the back is a different story. Old corrosion caused part of one lug to just crumble away. Half of the hole that holds the spring bar was gone. I remembered many years ago, when I worked in a hardware store, that we sold a product called PC-7. I did a search to see if it is still made. It is and is readily available from several sources. It is a two part epoxy paste that can be shaped and moulded and will not sag or run. It takes about 24 hours to achieve working strength. Once it has set up it can be filed, sawn, sanded, and drilled.

So, I mixed some up and reshaped the bad lug. After the paste had cured, I sanded the lug to shape with my moto-tool and re-drilled the spring bar hole with a very small drill bit. The repair does not look all that great, but it works. It sure is better than tossing a nice old watch. I suppose I could have shaped it a little more and made it look a little nicer, but I figured that the more stock I removed, the weaker the repair would be. I believe a little silver paint would make it even less noticeable, but I am fine with the way it is. PC-7 is great stuff.
Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That last photo shows the lug before the repair.
Joe
 
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Nice work Joe. I suppose you could have gussied it up a little but like to say at what cost to the strength of the repair?
 

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I bought this Timex "Q" for $5.00. It runs great and keeps time. The dial, crystal, and bezel look fine, but the back is a different story. Old corrosion caused part of one lug to just crumble away. Half of the hole that holds the spring bar was gone. I remembered many years ago, when I worked in a hardware store, that we sold a product called PC-7. I did a search to see if it is still made. It is and is readily available from several sources. It is a two part epoxy paste that can be shaped and moulded and will not sag or run. It takes about 24 hours to achieve working strength. Once it has set up it can be filed, sawn, sanded, and drilled.

So, I mixed some up and reshaped the bad lug. After the paste had cured, I sanded the lug to shape with my moto-tool and re-drilled the spring bar hole with a very small drill bit. The repair does not look all that great, but it works. It sure is better than tossing a nice old watch. I suppose I could have shaped it a little more and made it look a little nicer, but I figured that the more stock I removed, the weaker the repair would be. I believe a little silver paint would make it even less noticeable, but I am fine with the way it is. PC-7 is great stuff.
Joe
So let's get this straight, the glue cost more than the watch?
 

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Nicely done Joe. You've given it new life.
 
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Nice job. Epoxy is amazing stuff. I've never used PC-7, but I used some JB Weld Steel Stik epoxy putty to repair the grip frame on a .22 revolver and years later it's still holding up perfectly.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So let's get this straight, the glue cost more than the watch?
That is correct. But, I can use the "glue" (I prefer to NOT call it glue as it can be used for so much more than glue; it is an epoxy paste) for lots of other things.
Joe
 

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Nicely done! It must have come into contact with my sweat — I have a Raymond Weil whose BOR bracelet got some severe pits on the inside surface.

Never heard of PC-7, just the J B Weld previously mentioned. I’ve got some in the shop to help rebuild a worn rear bicycle dropout.


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Nice repair... JB weld is pretty amazing stuff. Back when I was club racing 1/10 scale RC cars with friends, I used it to repair a cracked aluminum engine mount, very similar to what you did. I had to sit out a round while it cured. But I was able to finish the day without incident. It was really goopy looking but I didn't care what it looked like.
 
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