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Discussion Starter #1
Hello ~

I have a Venus 140 chronograph that I am having restored. I need one part to complete the restoration - the cannon pinion to drive the time of day dial on the watch. Does anyone have any idea where I might be able to find this part?

Thank you!
 

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You won't find it anywhere, because it doesn't exist ;-) My watchmaker (who just revised mine) was surprised to find the hands' friction on the barrel. This application of a Roskopf-patent - common in cheap watches - makes sense - the second's hand is in the center, and there's no room for a cannon pinion.

I'll post an image tomorrow.


Regards,
Tomcat

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You won't find it anywhere, because it doesn't exist ;-) My watchmaker (who just revised mine) was surprised to find the hands' friction on the barrel. This application of a Roskopf-patent - common in cheap watches - makes sense - the second's hand is in the center, and there's no room for a cannon pinion.

I'll post an image tomorrow.


Regards,
Tomcat

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Tomcat ~

If you have the picture that would be helpful. I'm just trying to get this watch back to fully functioning condition to give back to my Dad for his birthday.

Thanks!
 

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There is a canon pinnion fitted to the Venus 140, but what happened to the cannon pinion from your watch?
I can see that it is in place on the photo from your previous thread on this watch.

These are like gold dust, I spent years tracking down hour, minute and cannon pinion for a Venus140 and still
haven't succeded in finding all the correct parts.
Your best bet is to look out for a donar movement from which to scavange the part.
 

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According to my watchmaker, this is where the hands' friction is located in the Venus 140:



There is, of course, a cannon pinion, but it doesn't serve as clutch (again, according to my watchmaker). Here are some breakdown photos taken on the dial side by my watchmaker when she reassembled my Aristo:








Images courtesy of Marlies Cermak, Blankenfelde-Dahlewitz, Germany

And this what it should look like completed:


Source: Google Images

Hope this helps. Hands not moving are not caused by the cannon pinion.

Best,
Tomcat
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There is a canon pinnion fitted to the Venus 140, but what happened to the cannon pinion from your watch?
I can see that it is in place on the photo from your previous thread on this watch.

These are like gold dust, I spent years tracking down hour, minute and cannon pinion for a Venus140 and still
haven't succeded in finding all the correct parts.
Your best bet is to look out for a donar movement from which to scavange the part.
Radger ~

I'm actually not sure. Honestly, I don't know a lot about the inner workings of this watch. I'm working with a local watch repair shop, and he told me that the cannon pinion was not engaging the hands to show the time of day, and thought that it may need to be replaced. He emailed me back last night saying that everything is good with the movement, but the only issue now is a “slippage problem with the gear underneath the mainspring then, which is not engaging the hands.”

I'm hoping to get this thing figured out soon.

If I come across a supplier with other Venus 140 parts in my search, I will let you know. Are there certain parts you're still looking for?

Thanks again.
 

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Tomcat ~

Thank you so much for the detailed pictures! I've shared these with the local guy working on my Grandpa's watch. I'm hoping that they will help solve the issue.

Thanks again!
 

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(...) the only issue now is a “slippage problem with the gear underneath the mainspring then, which is not engaging the hands.”
That's exactly what I meant: it's the brass wheel in my first photograph that should fit tightly (but not too tightly) over the member on top of the barrel and drives the hands from there. The friction must take the time-of-day power train with it, but must allow the brass wheel to rotate when the hands are set. (That slight resistance you feel when you set a watch, is what they call 'hands' friction'.) This is a construction normally seen only in cheap watches as it is prone to wearing out much more quickly than the 'classic' hands' friction by the cannon pinion, but it was a solution to the unique problem set by the unique layout of this movement.

The Chronograph hands are on an independent power train, given away by the fact that they continue to run even though the time-of-day display doesn't.

Best,
Tomcat
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's exactly what I meant: it's the brass wheel in my first photograph that should fight tightly (but not too tightly) over the member on top of the barrel and drives the hands from there. The friction must take the time-of-day power train with it, but must allow the brass wheel to rotate when the hands are set. (That slight resistance you feel when you set a watch, is what they call 'hands' friction'.) This is a construction normally seen only in cheap watches as it is prone to wearing out much more quickly than the 'classic' hands' friction by the cannon pinion, but it was a solution to the unique problem set by the unique layout of this movement.

The Chronograph hands are on an independent power train, given away by the fact that they continue to run even though the time-of-day display doesn't.

Best,
Tomcat
Tomcat ~

Wow! Thank you for the detailed information! I've passed this along to the guy working on the watch. If we ever bump into each other in real life, I definitely owe you a drink! :)
 

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Radger ~

I'm actually not sure. Honestly, I don't know a lot about the inner workings of this watch. I'm working with a local watch repair shop, and he told me that the cannon pinion was not engaging the hands to show the time of day, and thought that it may need to be replaced. He emailed me back last night saying that everything is good with the movement, but the only issue now is a “slippage problem with the gear underneath the mainspring then, which is not engaging the hands.”

I'm hoping to get this thing figured out soon.

If I come across a supplier with other Venus 140 parts in my search, I will let you know. Are there certain parts you're still looking for?

Thanks again.
Well there is definately a canon pinnion in your watch, but as Tomcat has explained , it does not deal with the required
hand slippage, that is dealt with from the slipping gear on the mainspring barrel. The canon pinnion should be free to turn on its arbour.

When your watchmaker realises this he should be able to tighten the friction and solve the problem.

Strangely enough, I need a cannon pinion but also the intermediate plate which houses the time of day arbour.
 
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