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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I’m trying to figure out what this is. I think the movement is Ingraham based on the key found inside, but it doesn’t look like any Ingraham clock. Perhaps Ansonia? Any enlightenment would be appreciated.

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Any markings on the movement? Paper label inside or on the back?

The Ansonia Parisian incorporated a few of those case details.

edit: Perusing online pictures showed some Ingraham clocks with that angular "rooflline" design at the top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Unfortunately the label is long gone. It’s very hard to get at the movement to see anything. I will try to examine it in daylight and look for some more clues. The carved head on top is not something I’ve been able to find an example of in Ingraham clocks, which is why I assumed it wasn’t Ingraham. I’ve seen a lot of Ansonia Monarchs that incorporate that statue head and look very similar to this one, but the coloring is not the same.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I guess it’s not that similar to Monarchs; they don’t have that pitched roof. Could it be an Ansonia with an Ingraham movement?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Closest thing I’ve been able to find is this Ingraham Liberty Clock. But mine has a bird etching, not a statue. FFBE131B-C51B-44BA-96BB-0007F6680035.jpeg
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I finally had time to bring the clock home and remove the face. The movement is William L. Gilbert and the Patent stamp says June 3, 1879. Can I reasonably assume it was built that year? I still haven’t been able to find one quite like it. Any suggestions on what it’s worth?

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Patent date is for the movement so the clock dates to some time after. A rough guess is between 1900 and 1879. I will look through some copies of old catalogs.
 

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Hi. I did find that very clock in an American Clock and Watch Museum reproduction of the Wm. L. Gilbert catalog of 1881. The Enterprise model was 22" tall came with time and strike movement and had a 6 inch dial. The glass shown in the catalog was of a ship passing a lighthouse. It is not unusual to see a variety of glass patterns. Your nice looking walnut case clock looks complete. It is not unusual for the finials on decorative shelf clocks to be lost as the wood dries and they fall out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you so much! I don’t think I would have ever found it with just google. I would like to hang on to it, but only if it will run without striking the hour. I can place it in my funeral home, but the chime would be a distraction. Do I just let one side wind down? I’m not sure which side is which, or if they are both necessary to run.
 

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The clock can certainly be run by only winding the time train. That's the one on the right. It would be a good idea to clean the movement and lubricate the pivots and escapement. Do you know anyone who works on mechanical clocks? A clock repair shop maybe?

edit: I corrected a confusing description of which side to wind. Also if it runs now you could just use it as is. Or I could walk you through what should and should nor be lubricated, amount and kind of oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Fortunately it's from the period of time gilbert made all brass movements.
Yes I noticed it was all brass and was pleasantly surprised at how amazingly clean everything looked inside. The clock ticks away as though it were made yesterday. I’m still fiddling with the pendulum to try and keep the correct time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The clock can certainly be run by only winding the time train. That's the one on the right. It would be a good idea to clean the movement and lubricate the pivots and escapement. Do you know anyone who works on mechanical clocks? A clock repair shop maybe?

edit: I corrected a confusing description of which side to wind. Also if it runs now you could just use it as is. Or I could walk you through what should and should nor be lubricated, amount and kind of oil.
That would be great if you could assist me with how to lube the movement. While we’re at it, maybe you could tell me where to lubricate my Seth Thomas I have ticking in my office. Also in the picture is the tube of oil I’ve had inside that Seth Thomas for about 25 years. I believe it was bought from the shop that last worked on it.
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To be honest I'm having second thoughts about lubing without dis-assembly and cleaning. I'm concerned about new oil loosening grime and dried oil and ending up with a sticky goo that stops the movement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well that makes sense. The clock is actually running fine right now so I guess I’ll let it continue to run until it shows trouble. I’ve found a spot for it and have gained an appreciation for it so I decided not to sell it. Thanks for your help.
 
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