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Re: Better is the Enemy of Good

You must be much better that this than I am, when you speak of adjusting your Triton rather than regulating it. Maybe I'm just misunderstanding what you've said.

My life's mission is to never have to go inside of my mechanical watches to regulate them. I prefer the idea of selecting a watch that has a small error rate and compensating for it by selecting the off-wrist storage positions, rather than having the watch regulated by non-factory personnel.

Some watches are designed to be easy to regulate with precision (like a Glasshutte Original with the swan neck regulator, which has a regulator that is bounded on both sides and adjusted via a fine-tuning adjustment screw) while others are not at all easy to regulate (like a Seiko 7S26 or the Orients and most of the less expensive Swiss watches, which all lack a fine-adjustment mechanism on the regulator.)

I've read story after story about people trying to regulate their watches that have small errors of only a few seconds daily, which would have been better left un-molested. Instead, they decide to perform the smallest possible nudge to the regulator to make things better...

... and what invariably seems to happen is that they induce a change that causes the new error rate to be several minutes per day instead of several seconds per day. Ouch. Those stories tell of people making one after another unsuccessful attempt to "improve" the watch's accuracy, where they end up chasing their tail by bouncing back between regulations that are either too fast or too slow. The story always ends with them selling-off the watch and buying another. This is particularly common in people who try to dabble in self-regulating their Seiko 7S26. The 7S26 seems to be the poster child for failed efforts at DIY regulation.

I don't mind having a watch that has a cumulative error rate on the order of 8 seconds per day, or a minute per week. Around here I see a lot of people complaining about that, and talking about self-regulating their own watches. Paying attention to stowage position, and using the watch's own positional anachronism to fine tune it's behavior, can solve the problem without opening the watch. That seems to be a much safer approach to me.
It's very possible I am simply misusing terminology. I have yet to open up the back of the watch to adjust it. So far, I'm using positional adjustments when I take my watch off for non-watch activities or to swap to another automatic. My OS Classic is about 3 months old and my Triton is about 2 months old, so they're barely broken in, if that. I'm out of town at the moment and wearing the Triton. It is currently +6 seconds over reference and was last manually set on July 1. I'm pleased with that accuracy, but I've had to keep it 12 down when not wearing it to keep it that accurate. Else it tends to gain about 5 spd in normal use.

Ideally, I'd adjust it such that I wouldn't have to use position for corrections. But I also realize that even if I opened it up and made a slight adjustment to correct that 5 spd error, in a few months (time, change of ambient temp, etc.) it would again likely drift. So I'm accepting my current method of correction as long as it remains reliable.

I also see that I mis-spoke. My OS Classic gains time 12 down and loses time 12 up. My Triton is the opposite, losing time 12 down and gaining time 12 up. I haven't really tested 9/3 up/down to see how those positions affect accuracy.

Edit: these are the first automatics I've owned in over 25 years. I fully expected to open them up to make manual adjustments to the internal regulator. So far, I'm pleased that I haven't had to crack the case yet to do that because using different positions has negated that need. So far. ;)
 

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I had originally planned on buying a "cheap" mechanical watch to see how accurate a cheap mechanical watch can be made in the era of high tech manufacturing. I chose Orient to see just how good the Japanese could make a cheap watch, comparing it to the more expensive Swiss alternatives.

Part of this consideration to buy a cheap mechanical watch was like yours, where I thought it'd make an inexpensive test bed if it ever came to opening/regulating one of these watches. I had originally planned on buying a "cheap" Orient dive watch like the Mako or Ray, but feature-creep set in and I ended up with the Triton. The Triton is a nice enough watch, and the 40N5 is a sufficiently nice movement that I'd rather not mess with regulating it -- the results out of the box are just too good so far to consider messing with it.

Since then I've bought a couple of "lesser" Orients to that I wouldn't feel too guilty about opening them up, if the need should arise. I'm happily surprised that these watches have also been remarkably accurate, on the range of 5-6 spd at their worst, with it being too early to tell about their positional effects. Even the Seiko 7S26 that I bought on a lark has been remarkably good, so good that I'm not planning to open it. that's probably a good thing, as I've heard several horror stories about the 7S26 being difficult to regulate. I haven't heard anything about regulating the Orients, though they do have the same type of regulation adjustment. Just eyeballing the watches, the ability to perform fine adjustments doesn't look any more feasible on the Orients than it would be on the Seikos, so I'm waiting to hear other peoples' success failure stores before I'll even think about it. But like you say, it's easy to enjoy a watch that's in the range of 5 spd and not worry about it early on, especially since things like temperature changes can cause more drift than the magnitude we're fussing over.

I'm truly amazed at the quality that can be had with such inexpensive mechancial watches like these Orients.
 

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My second Orient landed today...another Mako XL. Very satisfied with my orange XL and its accuracy in fact so much that the full lume dial version was a no brainer.

Triton is my next Orient...blue if I can wing it.
 

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Accuracy can be somewhat of a process, I've found. While i was initially prepared to pop the back off my new automatics and tweak the adjuster, I've found that simply letting them rest 12 up or 6 up appropriately in the winder (while I'm wearing the other one) will compensate for any variance. Both my Triton and my OS Classic are within 2 seconds of reference and I haven't set them since July 1 when I had to correct the date.

Yes, they've been out more than 3 seconds, but I've refined my process so I know pretty much now which watch needs to rest in what position and for how long in order to get back close to reference. So now I just alternate wearing which ever one I want and let the other self correct on the winder. ;)
 

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@ wristrocket....how does it wear? Comfy, heavy, does it want to wander or rotate around? I have two Mako XL's which I really enjoy for their looks, feel, accuracy, etc. But have heard complaints about their bracelets. Maybe I'm too low brow lizard brained to discern those type of nuances? But anyway the Triton is on the short list as my next watch. I wish the Mako XL's were 4 o'clock crowns, too, but at least the crown isn't a wrist digger.
Your thoughts on Triton's wearableness ...is that even a word.

TIA - Steve

who would die for an orange or yellow Triton...but will make do with blue...sigh..
 

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I find the Triton to wear very comfy on my 6.75 inch wrist. It also wears small imo. I tend to wear it more than I do my Orient Star Classic which I also love. The diver just suits my everyday life a little better. But I often give them both some daily wear time and keep the unworn watch on a winder so it's ready to go at a moments notice.
 

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I find the Triton to wear very comfy on my 6.75 inch wrist. It also wears small imo. I tend to wear it more than I do my Orient Star Classic which I also love. The diver just suits my everyday life a little better. But I often give them both some daily wear time and keep the unworn watch on a winder so it's ready to go at a moments notice.
Thanks for the real world response, speedlever.

Steve - who lived in NC - 30 consecutive years before moving out west with work.
 

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I discovered this watch today and I think I have to have it. I've wanted to add an Orient watch for years and this may be the one. The blue in particular is stunning. This, paired with a first gen Seiko Orange Monster, the classic SKX009, the incoming SNE499 Solar Tuna with gold accents and the Casio MDV as the beater makes for one awesome diver collection to me.
 

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@ wristrocket....how does it wear? Comfy, heavy, does it want to wander or rotate around? I have two Mako XL's which I really enjoy for their looks, feel, accuracy, etc. But have heard complaints about their bracelets. Maybe I'm too low brow lizard brained to discern those type of nuances? But anyway the Triton is on the short list as my next watch. I wish the Mako XL's were 4 o'clock crowns, too, but at least the crown isn't a wrist digger.
Your thoughts on Triton's wearableness ...is that even a word.

TIA - Steve

who would die for an orange or yellow Triton...but will make do with blue...sigh..
It wears smaller than my SRP773 Turtle, if that helps. Right now I have it on a black rubber Bonetto Cinturini strap, which gives it a classic diver look and feel.

The case is tall and pretty heavy, looking and feeling the part of a no-nonsense tool.

I'd say it wears about the same as an Skx007. It has the same basic shape and 4:00 crown.

I haven't worn it with the bracelet much. There's nothing wrong with it, I just didn't love it. I prefer the snug fit of Italian rubber.

The Triton is comfortable to wear all day, but if you're a suit and tie person, it might be too tall for cuffs.
Aside from the wearability, the quality and legibility of the dial are high points.

It is much more accurate than my Turtle too, which is no slouch.
Over the last 36 days the Triton has been +0.71 spd. Pretty much spot on from the factory.

In short, it's comfy and has the feeling of a bank vault's solidity.

-wristrocket

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I think the complaints about this watch are very frivelous. Jangly bracelet, slightly wobbly crown... really? The bracelet has solid endlinks, a divers extension, and looks really sharp. No, it's not a high end bracelet, but it's also not bottom of the barrel. And at the end of the day, the bracelet is replaceable. What really matters is the watch itself, and it has great specs all around for an insanely affordable price. It wears better than expected, looks amazing, and it pure quality.

I think its the best value diver out there. Watch Analog watch Watch accessory Fashion accessory Strap
Analog watch Watch Watch accessory Fashion accessory Strap
 
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