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I just received a watch with this COSC certificate. The accuracy measurements seem better than average. Anybody want to guess what the movement is?

What are the most accurate COSC results anyone has received with a watch?



COSC (800x450).jpg
 

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Rolex.
 

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So people still judge a watch by its COSC certificate ?
 

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Pretty impressive timing, whatever the movement. Who still provides COSC certificates? I think Omega still does if you pay them. I bet it's Omega's antimagnetic coaxial.
 

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Nobody cares anymore about accuracy as people buy RMs and pretty dials for filling their ego. Those who do care get spring drives.
 

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I just received a watch with this COSC certificate. The accuracy measurements seem better than average. Anybody want to guess what the movement is?

What are the most accurate COSC results anyone has received with a watch?



View attachment 4676314

I think the low sensitivity to varying temperatures is a good sign. People underestimate this parameter. You should be glad you got this promising temperature value.

But you know a test certificate is one thing, the proof of the pudding is in wearing it on the arm.
 

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Nobody cares anymore about accuracy as people buy RMs and pretty dials for filling their ego. Those who do care get spring drives.
An SD is overkill, any quartz watch should be good enough with the average 0.5spd.
 
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I'm going to go with Bremont because I can't recall a company that gives the COSC certificate out anymore, but since they make such a fuss about it and they're a new-ish brand they may give it out for free.

Or Invicta. Because this is WUS.
 

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Probably a mere 2824-2.
Close. It's an SW200 from CW that cost a whopping $600. I thought it was interesting that someone made the effort to dial it in like that. It seems like most companies adjust watches to run a few seconds fast when new. I set the watch with an atomic clock, and it's dead on so far.
 

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Close. It's an SW200 from CW that cost a whopping $600. I thought it was interesting that someone made the effort to dial it in like that. It seems like most companies adjust watches to run a few seconds fast when new. I set the watch with an atomic clock, and it's dead on so far.
But let's be realistic here: you woudn't need to gauge your time every morning against a reference if you had a quartz watch.
 

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But let's be realistic here: you woudn't need to gauge your time every morning against a reference if you had a quartz watch.

Nor would you with a reliably accurate mechanical watch. You don't need to do that with any consistently accurate watch and there are plenty of mechanical watches that are plenty accurate enough for this and which are consistent/reliable in said accuracy. I have a Seiko SARB that cost about $350 and it's good for about +/- 5spd at the absolute worst, I know this, and so I don't bother to check it more than maybe once a week if that - it just doesn't need it. If I had something super-accurate like a Rolex that was good to 1 or 2 spd or better (lots of Rolexes seem to be) then I probably wouldn't check it more than once a month - why bother? It's good to go and you know it's good to go.

Quartz is overrated as far as accuracy versus that of a mechanical goes. They tend to be more accurate, yes, but not always, and when they are it's usually not by much.
 

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Rolex does not provide a COSC certificate, so not that. Anyway, while interesting to know, any [automatic] watch will behave differently when used by different people. That COSC information is an academic exercise with limited real life usefulness beyond knowing the movement was certified.
 

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Nor would you with a reliably accurate mechanical watch. You don't need to do that with any consistently accurate watch and there are plenty of mechanical watches that are plenty accurate enough for this and which are consistent/reliable in said accuracy. I have a Seiko SARB that cost about $350 and it's good for about +/- 5spd at the absolute worst, I know this, and so I don't bother to check it more than maybe once a week if that - it just doesn't need it. If I had something super-accurate like a Rolex that was good to 1 or 2 spd or better (lots of Rolexes seem to be) then I probably wouldn't check it more than once a month - why bother? It's good to go and you know it's good to go.

Quartz is overrated as far as accuracy versus that of a mechanical goes. They tend to be more accurate, yes, but not always, and when they are it's usually not by much.
Huh??? Mechanical movements are measured in seconds per day. Quartz in seconds per month or year with no positional error and minimal temperature error in comparison.
 

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I'm going to go with Bremont because I can't recall a company that gives the COSC certificate out anymore, but since they make such a fuss about it and they're a new-ish brand they may give it out for free.

Or Invicta. Because this is WUS.
When I was selling Breitling, just a few years ago, they were.
 
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