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It seems every time I read a review comparing commonly used movements ETA 2892-2 comes out on top with respect to accuracy, reliability and durability. What is curious to me is how so many better houses choose the 2824-2 over it. Tudor, for instance. Why is that?
 

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I have no idea, but perhaps it is because the 2824 is easier to work with or easier to modify. But I found it very interesting that this very learned author put the ETA 2892-2A over the Rolex movement. From this article alone I have a new found appreciation for ETA.
 
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The typical thrashing that ETA gets in these pages is curious to say the least.
 

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Wow, a whole hour without the Rolex and in-house fanbois screaming "blasphemy". Probably too busy putting a hit out on the review author. :)
 

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Maybe because unlike most brand fanboys, the author of that article who took apart the movements for comparison knows what he's talking about?

I mean, any one can wax lyrical about pretty much anything but to actually look at it objectively with an eye for actual technical aspects means you need more than a fat wallet, the internet and Google.
 

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I have no idea, but perhaps it is because the 2824 is easier to work with or easier to modify.
ETA stopped selling ebauches a year ago. They have extensive modification options available for complete movements. Whereas IWC and others used to do some mods in-house they now have it done to their specs by ETA. I'm curious as to why Tudor chose 2824-2 over 2892-2 for the Black Bay/Pelagos releases?
 

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Here's the way I look at ETA: They make great movements, perfect for anything under 4k. But, when you're getting into the 5k+ range the manufacturer should put some passion and work into developing a movement imo. ETA is wonderful, really great for the world of watches, but I think in-house shows a dedication to watchmaking.
 

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Here's the way I look at ETA: They make great movements, perfect for anything under 4k. But, when you're getting into the 5k+ range the manufacturer should put some passion and work into developing a movement imo. ETA is wonderful, really great for the world of watches, but I think in-house shows a dedication to watchmaking.
Remember ETA offers four grades: Standard, Elabore, Top, and Chronometer, with increasing quality in adjustments and finishing. Chronometer receives COSC certification.
 

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Very good article. As a Rolex fan this certainly doesn't detract from my appreciation. The author obviously has a high opinion of the 3135 movement, citing it as the most sophisticated.

However it does open my eyes a bit more to the 2892-2A chronometer grade. Does anyone know which watches contain this movement (specifically chronometer grade as specified by the author)?
 

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Remember ETA offers four grades: Standard, Elabore, Top, and Chronometer, with increasing quality in adjustments and finishing. Chronometer receives COSC certification.
From what I've read the highest grade ETA movements sound fantastic and I'm not questioning that.
 

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I believe the article is originally from Chronometrie.

It seems every time I read a review comparing commonly used movements ETA 2892-2 comes out on top with respect to accuracy, reliability and durability. What is curious to me is how so many better houses choose the 2824-2 over it. Tudor, for instance. Why is that?
The same reviewer said that he doesn't see "any difference in accuracy between the two" (2892 and 2824) if they're "both fitted with the highest – chronometer – grade parts, carefully lubricated and adjusted to the best accuracy possible". For reliability and durability, he did say parts in the 2824 may wear out faster but there shouldn't be any significant difference if they're serviced in regular intervals.
 

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Remember ETA offers four grades: Standard, Elabore, Top, and Chronometer, with increasing quality in adjustments and finishing. Chronometer receives COSC certification.
This doesn't change the fact that ETA movements are still, really, cookie cutter movements. If you pay $5k+ for an ETA based movement, you're buying a movement that really isn't unique in any way. Plenty of mechanical watches have ETA movements and as far as I see it, there is simply no way to justify a $5k ETA watch when the same movement could be found in a $500 watch. Good example, the ETA 7750. Steinhart puts the 7750 in its chronos. Its chronos are about $900-1000. For about $7k, you could buy an IWC Portuguese Chrono that is, regardless of some small modifications and better finishing, the same movement. Why would you ever spend that much for a 7750 when, for the same money, you could get an Zenith El Primero, Glashutte chrono or JLC chrono?

I agree with omega1234, if I'm spending more than $5k, I want a movement that is unique to the brand, well-finished, accurate, aesthetically pleasing (No ETAs are really that pretty), and created with passion, not bought off the shelf.
 

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Probably the most widely used version of the 2892 would be the breathed on by Omega 1120.

Both Calibre 12 and 17 from TAGHeuer are 2892 based.
The ones in Grand Carrera are COSC but as seen in other watches, COSC doesn't always mean they start with the top off the shelf movements.

I'm on the look out for a three handed 2892 watch as well.


Very good article. As a Rolex fan this certainly doesn't detract from my appreciation. The author obviously has a high opinion of the 3135 movement, citing it as the most sophisticated.

However it does open my eyes a bit more to the 2892-2A chronometer grade. Does anyone know which watches contain this movement (specifically chronometer grade as specified by the author)?
 

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I have my eye on a Sinn U2 EZM 5 with an ETA 2893-2 in it with a 24-hour second time zone.
 

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I agree with omega1234, if I'm spending more than $5k, I want a movement that is unique to the brand, well-finished, accurate, aesthetically pleasing (No ETAs are really that pretty), and created with passion, not bought off the shelf.
I'm in agreement for the most part but I'd say $6K is where the in-house goodies start, notable exception being Nomos. I believe the discussion was to performance comparisons of accuracy, reliability and durability.
 

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ETA stopped selling ebauches a year ago. They have extensive modification options available for complete movements. Whereas IWC and others used to do some mods in-house they now have it done to their specs by ETA. I'm curious as to why Tudor chose 2824-2 over 2892-2 for the Black Bay/Pelagos releases?
Why?

Because the 2824 series (2824-2, 2834-2, 2836-2) is slightly more robust and durable than the 2892 series, and if both are chronometer grade, almost equal in accuracy... Personally, I have never understood the behind classing the 2892 as "better" than the 2824. Unmodified, they share the same system of regulation, similar balance material (the 2824 being larger), and similar balance spring construction; the gear train is similar. The only big difference between the two is the design of the autowinding mechanism, with the 2824-2 being simpler with fewer parts.....

If I had to choose between the two, and size was not an issue (i.e., I could live with a 1.0 mm thicker movement), I would pick a 2824-2.

That said, there are a number of features of the Rolex movement that do make it better (no quotation marks) than the 2892 series (IMO), 1) Glucydur gears, not brass, 2) adjustable end shake for the balance, 3) indirect minutes driven directly off the barrel, 4) simpler autowinding system, 5) free sprung balance....
 

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It seems every time I read a review comparing commonly used movements ETA 2892-2 comes out on top with respect to accuracy, reliability and durability. What is curious to me is how so many better houses choose the 2824-2 over it. Tudor, for instance. Why is that?
It's a good question. I would prefer even a 2836 over the 2824-2. I'm sure Tudor/Rolex have reasons and I doubt we'll ever know what they are. I suspect that at some point the 2892 will cease manufacture and suddenly become extremely valuable.


Will
 
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