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Hello guys,

First post over here and it is a favor for a friend at work. The watch was his grandfather's and he is looking for a little bit of info on it and a good place to get it repaired.

First of all, I did a little research and found that the movement serial number: 2838584 puts it made in 1915. Also the case was made by Crescent Watch Case Company. They merged with the Keystone Watch Case Company in 1904. Which would mean that the case was unused for 10 yrs or reused. Doesn't a 25 year case means that it is a pretty good one? Also, the dial has a few cracks. Can't the watchmaker clean the dial and minimize the visual impact of the cracks without totally refinishing it?

Any history or reviews on this movement or watch would be very helpful. And a trusted, knowledgeable, dependable watchmaker would be awesome. We live in North Alabama and the pick en's are slim around these parts. :)

Thanks for your help.

Cheers,
gigfy
 

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First about the movement. Good quality - a businessman's watch. Not railroad grade but pretty good. Well worth restoration. Illinois was a good company that eventually merged with Hamilton in the late 1920s.
The dial has a few hairline cracks but this is normal. Aside from light dusting I wouldn't do anything to it. These dials cannot be refinished very easily as they are enamel, not metal.
The case might have been around a while but Crescent brand didn't disappear in 1904 as far as I know. Keystone probably continued to make Crescent brand cases. A 25 year gold filled case is pretty good.
Thanks for posting.
 

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Thanks for the info Ray. :-!:-!

If you have any suggestions for a watchmaker, please PM.

Thanks,
gigfy
 

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Your watch was made in the 1916-1917 era. It appears to be missing the micrometer adjustment for the regulator, note the two empty screw holes in the balance cock. This will not affect the running of the watch, just makes it harder to finely adjust the watch.
 

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Your watchmaker should be able to soak the dial in something similar to what one cleans dentures with. That may get those hairlines to become less obvious. If I'm not mistaken (It's been a while since I've been into such things), those hands are rather special hands that usually come on a higher grade, perhaps Sangamo Special or Bunn Special, watch. Perhaps they're called something "baton" style hands. If there's no wear-through on the case back, it's probably a very nice G.F. case. It shouldn't be too difficult to find a regulator spring for that movement. My information (based on serial number) shows that the movement is an Illinois Grade 304, model #7, O.F. (Open Face), pendant set. Once you find a watchmaker, they should be able to get that one for you. Otherwise, you can look for a parts movement on Ebay, or? Good luck.
 
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