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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the interesting things about the three mid 1950s Stowa World Timer's that I have been able to track down is a misprint in the very busy dial on two of them. There are some obvious updates to the dial of the third as well. Here are pictures of all three:

Stowa's Museum watch:
16004890


My own World Timer

16004884


And an example for sale on www.ebay.co.uk:

16004892


Notice the 24 hour counterclockwise inner number ring right at the edge of the polar projection in all three. In the first two, there is an error, with the 8:00A position labeled "18" instead of "8". The third dial has this error corrected.

In addition to correcting this error, there are stylistic differences between the first two watches and the third.
  1. The font of the compass points (3-6-9-12) appears different in the third watch.
  2. The medallions used for the other hour markers are completely straight in the first two but are trapezoidal in the third.
  3. The location of the minute dots are moved towards the center in the third dial and is around the outside with the first two.
  4. Finally, there are just 12 radius lines in the clear window of the first two while there are 24 in the third.
I find these differences interesting. Given that Stowa probably wanted to correct the error in the first two, I surmise they pre-date the third. Also, I can say from experience, that the busy dial of the watch (31mm case) is hard to read from any distance. I wonder if the redesign was an effort to make the dial easier to read? Maybe easier to sell?

Curious in any case....The brochure below promotes a Stowa "Worldtime" that reflects the design and corrections from the third dial:

16004927
 

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Nice. Great read. Thanks for posting.

Learned something new today.
 

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First of all I want to thank you for using my pic without permission. :rolleyes:

You care too much about the differences in the dials:
STOWA had to take what they could get from the companies that designed, developed and manufactured the different dials.
Chance was stronger than intention.........

Here are three (almost) identical watches, all driven by the same movement:

Vertcal stripes in the inner area.
16006979



Wavy stripes horizontically
16006982


Additional printing above the sub-dial and other hands
16006983


I'm sure, all these disparities weren't intended by STOWA, but happened by chance: They took the parts that were available when they assembled the watch. I doubt they even realized the mismatch - if you can call it a mismatch at all.

Always remember please, that ways of making from sixty, seventy years ago can't be compared with today's methods.
Referring to your world-timer watch: Someone at the dial maker's company realized the misprint and corrected the mistake, without any fuss,


Volker
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First of all I want to thank you for using my pic without permission. :rolleyes:

You care too much about the differences in the dials:
STOWA had to take what they could get from the companies that designed, developed and manufactured the different dials.
Chance was stronger than intention.........

Here are three (almost) identical watches, all driven by the same movement:

Vertcal stripes in the inner area.
View attachment 16006979


Wavy stripes horizontically
View attachment 16006982

Additional printing above the sub-dial and other hands
View attachment 16006983

I'm sure, all these disparities weren't intended by STOWA, but happened by chance: They took the parts that were available when they assembled the watch. I doubt they even realized the mismatch - if you can call it a mismatch at all.

Always remember please, that ways of making from sixty, seventy years ago can't be compared with today's methods.
Referring to your world-timer watch: Someone at the dial maker's company realized the misprint and corrected the mistake, without any fuss,


Volker
Volker,

My most sincere apologies for requoting your picture w/o your permission. I appreciate your expertise and I did not intend to abuse it. Through exchange here on this forum and via virtual conversations with the other seller, I have learned quite a bit more about this watch than I expected and much more than Stowa themselves seemed to know. I was just trying to share that small body of historical perspective.

The dial maker not only corrected the misprint, but some significant redesign to the dial was done as well. This indicates to me that the issues with readability were addressed as well.

My regards,
Doug
 

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Stowa of today is not going to be offended by this posting. Its obvious that this was from a long time ago. I look forward to my next Stowa watch that will ship soon.

In watch collecting, like on Talking Watches, they speak of small differences in certain runs. One could argue that one poster pays too little care... Thank you for contributing and thank you for your attention to detail... I guess "always remember" that too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Stowa of today is not going to be offended by this posting. Its obvious that this was from a long time ago. I look forward to my next Stowa watch that will ship soon.

In watch collecting, like on Talking Watches, they speak of small differences in certain runs. One could argue that one poster pays too little care... Thank you for contributing and thank you for your attention to detail... I guess "always remember" that too.
I am not a coin collector, but I know that greatly valued coins are those that have errors or unintended variation. I am a watch collector only by accident, not by design and very new to this.

Most of the interesting watches I have were either gifted by loved ones (my wife, son, daughter, father) over the last 50 years, or inherited (like the Stowa) and recently rediscovered after 20+ years of storage. My goal is to try to find the "story" behind each watch as much as is possible and use that to reflect on "life and everything". I also am dedicated to getting all of these family watches back to good operational condition and made as presentable as possible.

An unintended but great byproduct of this has also been to share my watch travels with two nephews who are much more typical watch collectors.
 
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