WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Zenith Futur

Here are some shots of the 1970s Zenith quartz analogue digital I just bought at the suggestion of some of our wise members……. Considering its age it is in amazing condition, though it came with no box, no papers and, so far, no instructions, though I am assured they are on their way. As you’ll see, it has two flush buttons on the 9 side which I’m sure are for adjustment. In fact I have already discovered that the top one turns the minutes and the bottom one turns the hours (or it may be the other way round) but after you’ve set it, it refuses to run for about 15 minutes! And I have no idea how to set the date. I shall be interested to see what the instructions. Zenith say they have no books, no parts and they won’t service it, so I hope it behaves itself!





The two buttons on the 3 side produce a digital read-out of the seconds or the date in the little window below the dial




I’m going to have to get some-one to take the minute hand off and re-install it because it moves a minute at a time but sits about half-way between adjacent marks.



What do you think?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,654 Posts
Very nice looking watch!:-!
Good luck to the adjustment!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
I like that one a lot. :-! The minute hand moves one minute at a time? Interesting design. Reminds me of the Swiss station clocks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,166 Posts
Well, you are right in the middle of one of the big problems of collecting old electronic technology... I have a collection of vintage computers - mostly old PDPs from DEC (1960's and 70's).

You have to get manuals.

You have to get spares.

And you have to be able to fix them yourself (or with the help of friends!) if you expect them to work (most of mine don't :-d ).

The nice thing about these computers is these exist is sufficient number to be practicable... and costs are largely shipping and storage.

(It's a strange hobby. The demand for this specific equipment has fallen over the years after one of my old college roommates wrote an emulator for most of the hardware models that runs on a PC... so you don't have to have actual hardware to use the computers. It's better that way! Indeed, the emulators often have a feature to slow down their execution so it matches the speed of the original computer.)

But I don't think watch companies ever gave out enough information on their electronic technology to be able to do much beyond use them. So these will only become rarer as more and more movements die.

In my experience what kills most of these vintage electronics is battery leakage. Once the acid makes parts randomly not work, the movement is usually toast (dead beyond repair). :-|
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
And here are a couple of your pics resized and touched up a bit...






A real looker! :-!
Thank you! Apart from re-sizing them, what did you do to them?

Yes, it obviously thinks it's really the second hand of a modern quartz watch!

I haven't figured out how to shrink my pictures to manageable proportions. I've just been transferring them from i-photo to photobucket via a folder called "photos for editing" but any editing has been done in i-photo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Well, you are right in the middle of one of the big problems of collecting old electronic technology... I have a collection of vintage computers - mostly old PDPs from DEC (1960's and 70's).

You have to get manuals.

You have to get spares.

And you have to be able to fix them yourself (or with the help of friends!) if you expect them to work (most of mine don't :-d ).

The nice thing about these computers is these exist is sufficient number to be practicable... and costs are largely shipping and storage.

(It's a strange hobby. The demand for this specific equipment has fallen over the years after one of my old college roommates wrote an emulator for most of the hardware models that runs on a PC... so you don't have to have actual hardware to use the computers. It's better that way! Indeed, the emulators often have a feature to slow down their execution so it matches the speed of the original computer.)

But I don't think watch companies ever gave out enough information on their electronic technology to be able to do much beyond use them. So these will only become rarer as more and more movements die.

In my experience what kills most of these vintage electronics is battery leakage. Once the acid makes parts randomly not work, the movement is usually toast (dead beyond repair). :-|
I'm going to take it far enough apart to move the minute hand so that it lines up properly and I'll put a new battery in at the same time. Thanks for providing the thought.

When I think back to the earlier computers that I cut my electronic teeth on, I'm overcome with gratitude that I don't have to deal with them any more! In other words, I shall not be offering you any competition in your computer collection! My i-mac can do far more than I shall ever be capable of understanding but it is so much more capable than the old PCs I had in the late 80s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,448 Posts
Looking good Fran!

Shame that Zenith won't touch it, as its one cool watch. Do you have a wrist shot, mate?

All the best,

Alex;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
I have a collection of vintage computers - mostly old PDPs from DEC (1960's and 70's).
Brings back memories. In high school in '74, we had a PDP-4 with honest-to-god core memory. (The memory was a grid of wires with magnetic donuts.) To boot it, we had to key in a very short machine language program on the front panel. This made the machine smart enough to load a short paper tape. That in turn made the machine able to load the operating system on a longer paper tape. Definitely the bad old days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,166 Posts
...
I haven't figured out how to shrink my pictures to manageable proportions. I've just been transferring them from i-photo to photobucket via a folder called "photos for editing" but any editing has been done in i-photo.
Try http://www.irfanview.com/ It's simple and free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
454 Posts
One of my all-time favourite quartz watches, many congratulations :-!.

I've never seen one in the flesh just photo's - like yours - and old ads. Can I echo Alex's request for a wrist shot please, I'd like to get an idea of size and find dimensions don't always give a real world representation, sounds odd I know :-s.

Out of idle curiosity, roughly how much do these sell for these days?

Cheers,

Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,448 Posts
About £550, Gary. The vendor Fran bought from only had one, and Gisbert A. Joseph (where Bruce and I got our GP's) has one for about 700euro's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Try http://www.irfanview.com/ It's simple and free.
Thanks for the suggestion, EEB, but unfortunately that doesn't work on Macs. I've got Photoshop Elements and I'm trying to import photos to it from i-photo, which is the storage and processing program that comes with a Mac. Unfortunately (again!), there is only very limited adjustment or editing you can do with i-Photo and neither size nor color is included.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Looking good Fran!

Shame that Zenith won't touch it, as its one cool watch. Do you have a wrist shot, mate?

All the best,

Alex;-)
As soon as I figure out how to suck my i-Photo photos (or photos sitting on my desktop) into Photoshop Elements, and then figure out how to use that, I'll try to take a wrist-shot!

Take care and have a Happy New Year!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top