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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know there is a lot of deliberation over the Invicta brand. Some hate them, others love them and yet many could care less. Personally, on the whole I think they are a little over-trendy for me. However, they make SO MANY different styles that I often see a few that I like. My question is this. I notice they use a lot of different movements. Are any of you familiar enough with them that you know a particular movement to look for with their models? Also, are there any movements they use that you always know to stay away from?
Thanks.

[EDIT] I noticed that many of their quartz watches use the Ronda 5030.D Quartz movement, which as far as mid-grade quartz movements go, I thought was always pretty reliable. Thoughts?
 

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Someone correct me if I am wrong... They generally use decent movements. The two Invictas that I own have a Miyota 8125 and ETA G10.211 movement. The issue is usually how the movements are cased and quality control in that regard.
 

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If you go with automatics, they seem to be moving to the NH35 (Seiko/TMI) movements quite a lot, in their less-inexpensive autos They also use ETA/Sellita in higher priced pieces. The Seiko/TMI auto-chronos are also quite good.

Many of their quartz pieces use inexpensive, and often Asian-made Swiss parts movements, which are not as accurate or high quality as their Swiss Made counterparts.

Anyhow, if you feel that you must buy one of their watches, make sure it's at a steep discount off the regular selling price (not the MSRP) and know what you are (and aren't) buying.
As far as the most popular movements they use, the vast majority of autos seem to be pretty good.
 

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Frankly, if you look at the past few years or so, most Invicta problems stated by owners have to do with chronograph-style watches, and in many cases it seemed to be in the manufacturing phase rather than the actual movements that were the problem.
 

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I like my 8215. Great movement. Miyota rocks. Seiko does a great job too, and selitta and ETA. there all great!
 

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My best Invicta movements have been:
-Ronda 5040/5030
-ETA G10.211
-TMI NH25A
-Miyota 8215

I own multiples of each and NONE have given me any troubles. I also have one Citizen OS50 Chronograph and its been trouble free as well.

I have a BUNCH of Ronda 3-hand quartz movements that have not given me any troubles. I don't feel comfortable spending more than ~$300 on an invicta so that rules out any mechanical swiss made movements from my collection.

The Invicta movments to avoid are the retrograde day of the week and the SANIII Ocean quest colored carbon fiber dials.
 

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Many of their quartz pieces use inexpensive, and often Asian-made Swiss parts movements, which are not as accurate or high quality as their Swiss Made counterparts.

It's easy to assume this, but how do you know it?
 

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Sean779 said:
It's easy to assume this, but how do you know it?
+1 it's not like you can regulate a quartz easily. I'd be very interested in seeing if you have anything to back that up.
 

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It's easy to assume this, but how do you know it?

You can check out the manufacturer's spec/tech sheets. At least on the one's I've checked, the Swiss Made movements had tighter specs than their Asian counterparts.

Edit: Browsing a few movements on Ronda's site, they don't list separate performance specs for the Swiss parts vs Swiss Made. They only list jewel and plating differences between the two. Now this is going to gnaw at me until I remember the movements I checked...
 

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You can check out the manufacturer's spec/tech sheets. At least on the one's I've checked, the Swiss Made movements had tighter specs than their Asian counterparts.

Edit: Browsing a few movements on Ronda's site, they don't list separate performance specs for the Swiss parts vs Swiss Made. They only list jewel and plating differences between the two. Now this is going to gnaw at me until I remember the movements I checked...
Thanks for providing some background to your statement. I just got an Invicta quartz with the Ronda "Swiss Parts" and I wasn't quite sure what it meant. From what you're saying Ronda provides specs both for their Swiss made movement AND specs for the Swiss (Ronda) parts movements that are assembled in Asia. Does this mean that Ronda oversees/controls the Asian manufacturing/assembly of their movements? I'm assuming that must be the case or how otherwise would they have specs for those models to compare them with their Swiss sourced and assembled movements. I guess it does make sense that the Asian parts models could use non-Ronda parts that are made with looser tolerances.

For some reason I assumed that Swiss parts movement meant simply the movement was assembled in Asia.

As a bit of an aside, based on my experience with many quartz movements, Swiss and Japanese, the Rondas have been the best timekeepers. It's as though other quartz makers err too easily on making sure their quartz movements at least run fast while Ronda takes more of a chance on getting closer to +/- O sec. even if occasionally one emerges just a tad slow. My recent Invicta Swiss parts movement (Ronda) follows in that line for me as it also is pretty much +/- O sec.
 

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Thanks for providing some background to your statement. I just got an Invicta quartz with the Ronda "Swiss Parts" and I wasn't quite sure what it meant. From what you're saying Ronda provides specs both for their Swiss made movement AND specs for the Swiss (Ronda) parts movements that are assembled in Asia. Does this mean that Ronda oversees/controls the Asian manufacturing/assembly of their movements? I'm assuming that must be the case or how otherwise would they have specs for those models to compare them with their Swiss sourced and assembled movements. I guess it does make sense that the Asian parts models could use non-Ronda parts that are made with looser tolerances.

For some reason I assumed that Swiss parts movement meant simply the movement was assembled in Asia.
Ronda doesn't (currently?) list the specs differently for each location of manufacture. They list only one set of performance specs, regardless.
I don't know if Ronda oversees Asian manufacturing. I'd assume they at least audit the process from time to time. They definitely have to QC batch samples, probably locally and in Switzerland.

From what I can currently find, the only differences I see listed are the number of jewels (higher jewel count on the Swiss) and plating (gold on the Swiss vs nickel on the Asian) used. For some movements, they are the same.

They certainly wouldn't disclose the quantity of Swiss vs Asian components in either. Where the jewel count differs for the same movement caliber, I wouldn’t think that the parts breakdown between the Swiss vs Asian production could be identical. Not sure what difference that otherwise makes, except, perhaps, longevity.

I also checked a few movements for ISA and ETA, and didn't see differences listed. I wish I could recall where I read the differences. It's probably best to take it with a grain of salt.
Maybe one of our resident watchmakers will chime in.

Edit: I found an 2009 post by lysanderxiii, on tz-uk.com here: http://www.tz-uk.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=68258&p=785204#p711369

Here's the relevant quote:

Also, all of ETA's quartz movements were available in Swiss made and non-Swiss made.
955.xx2 or .xx1 are the Swiss ones
955.xx4 are the non-Swiss ones, these have slightly looser accuracy requirements, the Swiss are -0.3 to +0.5 s/d; the non-Swiss are -0.4 to +0.6 s/d.


It looks like ETA uses/used different calibers to denote their Swiss vs. Asian manufactures.
Don't know if it's accurate, but at least I know I wasn't imagining it. ;-)
 

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Ronda doesn't (currently?) list the specs differently for each location of manufacture. They list only one set of performance specs, regardless.
I don't know if Ronda oversees Asian manufacturing. I'd assume they at least audit the process from time to time. They definitely have to QC batch samples, probably locally and in Switzerland.

From what I can currently find, the only differences I see listed are the number of jewels (higher jewel count on the Swiss) and plating (gold on the Swiss vs nickel on the Asian) used. For some movements, they are the same.

They certainly wouldn't disclose the quantity of Swiss vs Asian components in either. Where the jewel count differs for the same movement caliber, I wouldn’t think that the parts breakdown between the Swiss vs Asian production could be identical. Not sure what difference that otherwise makes, except, perhaps, longevity.

I also checked a few movements for ISA and ETA, and didn't see differences listed. I wish I could recall where I read the differences. It's probably best to take it with a grain of salt.
Maybe one of our resident watchmakers will chime in.

Edit: I found an 2009 post by lysanderxiii, on tz-uk.com here: TZ-UK • View topic - Quality quartz ETA movements

Here's the relevant quote:

Also, all of ETA's quartz movements were available in Swiss made and non-Swiss made.
955.xx2 or .xx1 are the Swiss ones
955.xx4 are the non-Swiss ones, these have slightly looser accuracy requirements, the Swiss are -0.3 to +0.5 s/d; the non-Swiss are -0.4 to +0.6 s/d.


It looks like ETA uses/used different calibers to denote their Swiss vs. Asian manufactures.
Don't know if it's accurate, but at least I know I wasn't imagining it. ;-)

good stuff, thanks! I had no idea these two lines of movements, Swiss and Asian, from Swiss manufacturers like ETA and Ronda. I'm certainly glad I asked you to back up your statement!
 

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bluloo said:
You can check out the manufacturer's spec/tech sheets. At least on the one's I've checked, the Swiss Made movements had tighter specs than their Asian counterparts.

Edit: Browsing a few movements on Ronda's site, they don't list separate performance specs for the Swiss parts vs Swiss Made. They only list jewel and plating differences between the two. Now this is going to gnaw at me until I remember the movements I checked...
Question answered! Thanks! I knew you would have something to back it up, just needed to give you a challenge :D
 

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Very informative thread thanks buloo!! I have always suspected there were more similarities than differences between the various quartz movement manufacturing origins. I have some $5 junk-watches, with quartz movements from lord only knows where... and they are just as accurate as anything else in my collection. These watches sit on my shelf for months (sometimes years) unattended, I pick them up every once in a long while.
 

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Generally speaking with Invicta and I think with most name brand watches.

1...quartz movements are not going to be a consideration as far as accuracy. If you are really concerned about a second or two a day....go with the thermo-compensated quartz movements which are insanely accurate and as the name implies the oscillations and movement compensates for temperature fluctuations as it can affect the quartz accuracy.

2. It seems to me that Invicta uses a higher grade of quartz movement than most of their counterparts in the economy/fashion end of the watch market. Look at Fossil and other brands which are not in house watch movement producer brands (Casio, Seiko, Citizen, swatch) in the $50-$200 price range and you will see a wide range of movements used. Some use no name movements from China and other parts unknown and others use higher quality name brand movements that are reliable.

And, is this a good reason for purchasing watches from brands like Seiko, Casio, Citizen, and Swatch. Sure!

3. I give Invicta a measure of credit for letting us know what movements are being used in their watches. I have some very nice Ronda, ETA, Sellita and other movements in my Invicta pieces and have had very few problems with the quartz pieces, in particular. I have handled hundreds of them, also, just as an FYI. Take it for what it is worth.

4. Invicta is not without fault. They did create quite a stir with labeling watches as "swiss" on the dial and were using asian made movements in the watches. Any watch with the "swiss" or "swiss made" designation on the dial is expected to have a "swiss made" movement in the watch along with other requirements as outlined in the swiss feds regulations for 'swiss made' watches.

5. Like any product, when you put out millions of pieces a year, there are going to be defects. No exception with Invicta. And their customer service definitely could use some attention. Not a strong point for them.

6. They also are quite open to using new movements. So, I think they do sometimes get in a situation where due to the complexity of the movement (number of subdial hand locations as well as complexity of construction) as is common with retrograde and chronographs movmements, that they can have problems. I have had a few chrono pieces where sub dial functions did not function properly. I think it was more of an issue with the dial geometry and layout not being accurate. I believe it was the subdial holes in the dial were slightly off center preventing the armature from moving properly. I also have noticed some issues with crown length and crown function on some of their quartz pieces. Most recently on a few venom pieces using the Ronda startech movements. Probable a fairly simple fix. They also had some issues when they first started using the Sellita SW 200 Automatic with crown length issues affecting time setting, date change ability, and such.

HOpe that helps.
 

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Frankly, if you look at the past few years or so, most Invicta problems stated by owners have to do with chronograph-style watches, and in many cases it seemed to be in the manufacturing phase rather than the actual movements that were the problem.
I'll back that comment up. I've had two Russian Diver chronos that just up and died. Even after changing the battery they wouldn't start back up again. The third one however is still running strong (knock wood). I have two Lupah chronos that also work without issues (knock wood again). If its ok with everybody may I ask if anybody else has experienced a problem similar to this?

Sent from my BlackBerry 8530 using Tapatalk
 

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Generally speaking with Invicta and I think with most name brand watches.

1...quartz movements are not going to be a consideration as far as accuracy. If you are really concerned about a second or two a day....go with the thermo-compensated quartz movements which are insanely accurate and as the name implies the oscillations and movement compensates for temperature fluctuations as it can affect the quartz accuracy.

2. It seems to me that Invicta uses a higher grade of quartz movement than most of their counterparts in the economy/fashion end of the watch market. Look at Fossil and other brands which are not in house watch movement producer brands (Casio, Seiko, Citizen, swatch) in the $50-$200 price range and you will see a wide range of movements used. Some use no name movements from China and other parts unknown and others use higher quality name brand movements that are reliable.

And, is this a good reason for purchasing watches from brands like Seiko, Casio, Citizen, and Swatch. Sure!

3. I give Invicta a measure of credit for letting us know what movements are being used in their watches. I have some very nice Ronda, ETA, Sellita and other movements in my Invicta pieces and have had very few problems with the quartz pieces, in particular. I have handled hundreds of them, also, just as an FYI. Take it for what it is worth.

4. Invicta is not without fault. They did create quite a stir with labeling watches as "swiss" on the dial and were using asian made movements in the watches. Any watch with the "swiss" or "swiss made" designation on the dial is expected to have a "swiss made" movement in the watch along with other requirements as outlined in the swiss feds regulations for 'swiss made' watches.

5. Like any product, when you put out millions of pieces a year, there are going to be defects. No exception with Invicta. And their customer service definitely could use some attention. Not a strong point for them.

6. They also are quite open to using new movements. So, I think they do sometimes get in a situation where due to the complexity of the movement (number of subdial hand locations as well as complexity of construction) as is common with retrograde and chronographs movmements, that they can have problems. I have had a few chrono pieces where sub dial functions did not function properly. I think it was more of an issue with the dial geometry and layout not being accurate. I believe it was the subdial holes in the dial were slightly off center preventing the armature from moving properly. I also have noticed some issues with crown length and crown function on some of their quartz pieces. Most recently on a few venom pieces using the Ronda startech movements. Probable a fairly simple fix. They also had some issues when they first started using the Sellita SW 200 Automatic with crown length issues affecting time setting, date change ability, and such.

HOpe that helps.
Someone please correct me if I am wrong but I don't think the word "SWISS" by itself on the dial has any regulatory requirements under Swiss Fed regulations. The word "SWISS" by itself is as unregulated as the phrases "SWISS MOVT" and "SWISS PARTS MOVEMENT". (Someone please correct me if I am wrong).


Its the phrases "SWISS MADE" and "SWISS MOVEMENT" that have legal requirements associated with them.
 

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Interesting thread. Years ago, I used to own nothing but Invicta quartz watches and only had one issue after owning over 300 of their watches. I think that their watches had a much better build years ago, but that is just my opinion. And yes, I was a chronic flipper. ;-)
Yes, I agree with you. The older models Invicta's were built much better than some of the new ones. I think I had about 100 or so back then, but jumped off of the Invicta wagon and sold all of the to get some much higher end watches. And yes, sadly I flip watches way to much myself! I think I even have some posted now to flip! I need to stop! lol
 
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