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Just received my new Hamilton Khaki Field Auto H70595963 watch and was expecting the calibre to be marked H-10 as described on the Hamilton Watch website H70595963 - Khaki Field Auto 40mm | Hamilton Watch. Instead the case is marked 2824-2. I'm confused by this difference. I have a call into the dealer who has a call into Hamilton. Anyone shed some light on this? UPDATE: I'm being told that they are able to get the 80 hours reserve from the 2824-2 due to a frequency change. I'm thinking there might be another change made to the 2824-2 to do this, too.

Thanks!

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Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #3
tinknocker,

Thanks, I'm aware of that page. What I wasn't aware of is that the calibre H-series was an upgrade to the 2824-2 movement. But the movement described and pictured is what the H70595963 has. :)

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Mike
 

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Just received my new Hamilton Khaki Field Auto H70595963 watch and was expecting the calibre to be marked H-10 as described on the Hamilton Watch website H70595963 - Khaki Field Auto 40mm | Hamilton Watch. Instead the case is marked 2824-2. I'm confused by this difference. I have a call into the dealer who has a call into Hamilton. Anyone shed some light on this? UPDATE: I'm being told that they are able to get the 80 hours reserve from the 2824-2 due to a frequency change. I'm thinking there might be another change made to the 2824-2 to do this, too.

Thanks!

--
Mike
So wait! Does this mean that they have lowered the BPH from 28,000 to 21,600? When I searched on the Hamilton Calibers page, it read that they had improved the spring in order to achieve the 80 hour power reserve. It also states a number of other work they did to the movement. Do you think it is just hype? I am interested in the same watch and am about to pull the trigger. How do you like the watch? Does it hack and wind as every other 2824-2 or is that different in this version?
 

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Mike, depending where you bought the watch, it could just be the older model with the stock 2824. I'm not sure when they started offering the H calibres, but I thought the newer ones had that designation.

Personally, I'd prefer the 28k bpm over the longer PR. Disappointed this is how they achieved more PR. I started buying Swiss watches specifically for the higher beat ETA movement.
 

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Eta/tissot powermatic 80. Try searching that. Or just tissot powermatic 80. I have been very pleased with mine. Each wind equals about an hour of reserve. I did not want to wind mine 80 times to test this and I have no winder. I wound it 50 times and wore it a day ,making a hand stirring a pot of soup motion when I thought of it. Within 2 seconds after 70 hours plus. I never count the first second when timing, even with a hacking movement. There is also a chronometer grade of this movement offered by tissot. Not sure if hamilton offers this. Don't think so.
 

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Eta/tissot powermatic 80. Try searching that. Or just tissot powermatic 80. I have been very pleased with mine. Each wind equals about an hour of reserve. I did not want to wind mine 80 times to test this and I have no winder. I wound it 50 times and wore it a day ,making a hand stirring a pot of soup motion when I thought of it. Within 2 seconds after 70 hours plus. I never count the first second when timing, even with a hacking movement. There is also a chronometer grade of this movement offered by tissot. Not sure if hamilton offers this. Don't think so.
Except the 80hr reserves on the powermatics are also achieved largely the same way: by dropping the frequency from 4 Hz (28800 bph) to 3 Hz (21600 bph). They predate the Hamilton 80hr versions by a year or two (but I think they came a year after the longer reserve chronos (H-21/31). I do like what they've done with the Powermatic and Seastar designs, though.
 

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^i guess I was a little unclear. From what I have read, it is the same eta movement, initially made for tissots lines. The only differences being decoration of the rotor in the base grade.
 

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^i guess I was a little unclear. From what I have read, it is the same eta movement, initially made for tissots lines. The only differences being decoration of the rotor in the base grade.
Gotcha, sorry. I read it as a contrast to chief's complaint.


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Does anyone know, finally, what exactly are the differences between the 80 hour versions and 40 hour versions of this movement? Did they basically just lower the beat rate, or did they also enhance the spring and/or do other things? I would think lowering the beat rate by 25% would increase reserve by 25%, not by 100%. But then, I don't know anything really about watch movements.
 

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I got this info from the Hamilton University website.

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H-10, H-30 and H-40, a trio of new Hamilton movements developed with ETA , boasts a typical power reserve of 80 hours.
The following elements have been modified:

- The entire kinematic chain has been refined, from the barrel to the escapement
- The escapement regulator has been suppressed, facilitating optimal reliability and precision
- The main spring has been improved to increase a typical power reserve of 80 hours.
- The mono-block rotor is distinctively skeletonized with an “H” shape and aviation-inspired cut-outs, a signature of individualization.


H-10 Hours, Minutes, Seconds, Date function
H-30 Hours, Minutes, Seconds, Weekday and Date function
H-40 Hours, Minutes, Seconds, Weekday and Date function
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As others have mentioned, this modified H-10 has a lower frequency than the standard ETA it's based on, but personally, I'd much rather have the H-10's rare 80 hour power reserve over the ETA's higher frequency.
 

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It seems as though a lot of the Swatch-owned brands are switching to this type of movement - the lower bph (21,600) and increased power reserve. My Mido Commander Chronometer has one of those - very accurate, but I don't like the lower bph. Will these 80-hour automatic movements soon be ubiquitous in the Swatch kingdom?
 

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To me the H-10's accuracy so far is a welcomed improvement now time will tell as to it's durability but one thing should be obvious slowing the movement should extend the service life.
 

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To me the H-10's accuracy so far is a welcomed improvement now time will tell as to it's durability but one thing should be obvious slowing the movement should extend the service life.
To me this benefit outweighs the slightly less smooth second hand. It's nice to know that you shouldn't have to worry about servicing for a long, long time
 

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Slowing down the beat rate doesn't necessarily extend the recommended service interval because it doesn't help with some critical parts like the auto-winding mechanism. And movements working at higher beat-rate might have less build-up residus in the escapement assembly than movements with lower beat-rate as they run smoother.

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Wouldn't say that's the case...

Here's a link for a Hamilton Khaki Aviation with a ETA 2824-2 movement, as you can see from the photo the rotor is the updated variant with the "H" cut out on the older movement. If you look closely on the back of the case 2824-2 is engraved in the back of it. www.ashford.com /images/catalog/hamilton/khaki-aviation/H76665725-SD_BXA.jpg

Photo is from Ashford's website they offer both the 2824-2 and H-10 movement in the Hamilton Khaki Aviation watch.
Here's a photo of the H-10 movement:
http;//www .ashford .com/us/watches/hamilton/khaki-aviation/H76665835.pid?nid=cpg cat6032&so=1
 

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Wouldn't say that's the case...

Here's a link for a Hamilton Khaki Aviation with a ETA 2824-2 movement, as you can see from the photo the rotor is the updated variant with the "H" cut out on the older movement. If you look closely on the back of the case 2824-2 is engraved in the back of it. www.ashford.com /images/catalog/hamilton/khaki-aviation/H76665725-SD_BXA.jpg

Photo is from Ashford's website they offer both the 2824-2 and H-10 movement in the Hamilton Khaki Aviation watch.
Here's a photo of the H-10 movement:
http;//www .ashford .com/us/watches/hamilton/khaki-aviation/H76665835.pid?nid=cpg cat6032&so=1
That's a mismatch. Was Hamilton trying to use up their extra screw-down case backs or something? Or did Ashford switched them (unlikely)? Who knows? However...

If you look at the balance wheel on the photo in your first link, the regulating pins are absent. That's the Hamilton H10/ETA Powermatic 80 (ETA C07.111), not the 2824-2.
H76665725-SD_BXA.jpg


On the photo via your second link, the adjustments are clearly evident. That's the 2824-2.



Clipboard01.jpg


I looked into this when I bought my Hammy. I have the H10 in my H70625133 (Hour/Minute/Second/Date).

H70625133_3.jpg



Here's a great YouTube video by Bruce Williams comparing the two movements in the Khaki King.



 
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