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I have seen various comments on this forum that you must always keep a gift forever. Is this normal?

If I kept every gift, my house would literally look like a hoarders nest, and my watch box would be a mess. I am grateful to the giver for any gifts I have received, however I only keep items that I actually like and use. I re-home, or donate gifts that don’t work for me. I would feel disingenuous holding onto things that I don’t use, when someone else might enjoy them.

I have always felt that the purpose of a gift was to be given and received. Once it has been given, it has fulfilled its primary purpose, as an exchange to demonstrate love and appreciation for the person.

Does this philosophy make me a bad person?
 

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The only watch gift that I've ever received was a Bar-mitzvah present from my Grandmother. It was a '90s era Omega Manhattan Connie with day and date sub-dials and a quartz movement. I kept it into my early 20s, but I never wore it. Age thirteen is the wrong time to pick out a nice watch that you plan to keep forever. Since I never wore it, on the rare occasions when I did want to put it on, the battery would always be dead, and so I'd just put it back in the drawer I pulled it out of and forget about it for another six months.

I eventually sold that watch on eBay, and I don't regret doing so. I never told her that I sold the watch, but it's not like she ever saw me wearing it anyway. It's taken me years of collecting to eventually figure out what my taste in watches is.

One of my current (likely) keepers is an Omega Seamaster 120M, and I look at it as a bit of a nod to that old watch. The 2501 reference 120M didn't exist until a few years after I got my original Omega, but the two aren't that far apart, and I wonder if I would've picked it out then over the Connie if it was around. In any case, I remember the sentiment, and the watch, but I now have an Omega that I love wearing vs. one that I did not.



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Depends on the nature of the gift and who it's from...
 

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I’m genuinely curious. In what context would someone feel compelled to keep a gift forever, that they didn’t really want and don’t actually use?
When it’s from a spouse, family member or a special occasion… obviously none of those apply to your personal beliefs or situation
 

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I personally wouldn't! Maybe if it was like a gift from an ex or something lol. I just feel like if you got the gift for a specific occasion, memories/thoughts in that watch should be worth more than a random watch out there. Me going out and buying a watch I've been seeking only has monetary value/me giving myself a gift-- someone giving me a watch holds more than just monetary value (I would say it depends on the occasion though)!

To the most extreme, let's say my great great great great grandfather (picking someone who is clearly not alive, so I don't jinx anything...) gave me a watch, I want to look down at my collection and know that he gave me that and I can remember him through that, not look at my new Rolex and remembered that I sold my great great great great grandfather's gift and bought the Rolex with the funds.
 

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Deceased loved one bequeathed a watch to you = keep it forever.
 
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according to my value system, it is absolutely a sin. To me, it says: practicality over human sentiment. But there are some who do have that hierarchy of values and thats fine.

There are gifts I have gotten rid of, but that was because the relationship was not meaningful and/or I did not care for the sentiment being expressed (a one sided love interest for example, or a relationship based on some sort of mutual benefit, such as a business partner)

If it was from anyone who truly meant anything to me I could not bear to do it (especially a watch) In fact, some of my absolutely most meaningful watches are ones that I don't even wear anymore
 

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An ex gf gave me a cheapo watch with a picture of her on it. That one did not make the “keep” list. However my ex wife gave me a Tag and a Tissot as sobriety gifts. Those of course stay forever.

I have seen various comments on this forum that you must always keep a gift forever. Is this normal?

If I kept every gift, my house would literally look like a hoarders nest, and my watch box would be a mess. I am grateful to the giver for any gifts I have received, however I only keep items that I actually like and use. I re-home, or donate gifts that don’t work for me. I would feel disingenuous holding onto things that I don’t use, when someone else might enjoy them.

I have always felt that the purpose of a gift was to be given and received. Once it has been given, it has fulfilled its primary purpose, as an exchange to demonstrate love and appreciation for the person.

Does this philosophy make me a bad person?
 

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Seems like you are missing the point OP.

No one said you need to treasure literally everything that's been given to you forever. Usually the conversation here is whether it is in poor taste to exchange the thoughtful and expensive good received, for cash. Which in that case I'd say it is in poor taste, but ... sin?

No one is saying if your coworker gifted you a sweater that doesn't fit, you have to keep that in the closet forever.
 
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