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Hi all, first post, so apologies if this has landed in the wrong section.

I've recently discovered my grandfather's Seiko 7009 and started wearing it. The crystal on it is cracked and chipped, so I was thinking of replacing it. As I've started to look around, I learned about sapphire crystals. Does anyone know if it's at all possible to find a sapphire replacement for an old watch like this, or should I stick to mineral?
 

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The answer to first question is - yes. If you search the bay for "Seiko 7009 crystal" you will find many suppliers. Are there sapphire crystals available for this watch - I don't know, you'll have to read the descriptions of the fleabay items offered. In any case, Seiko uses crystal called Hardlex and personally I wouldn't bother trying to find sapphire replacement for this particular watch.
 

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You should make sure to search for the correct crystal using the full reference of the watch, not just 7009. Also, don't assume that the crystal currently in the watch is original; research the correct original crystal. My advice would be to replace it with something as similar as possible, since that's how you will usually get the most water-resistant seal.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the feedback folks.

My watch says 7009-465L on the dial, but I assume that's the designation of the dial. On the 7009-3041.

I found an item on ebay titled "MINERAL CRYSTAL FOR VINTAGE SEIKO 7009 7S26 PART NUMBER 310W17LN"


The description suggests that this should be a match (it lists several 7009 models, including my 7009-3041), but I can't find any manual online which says whether part #310W17LN is indeed the correct original part.

Expert opinions?:)
 

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You should make sure to search for the correct crystal using the full reference of the watch, not just 7009. Also, don't assume that the crystal currently in the watch is original; research the correct original crystal. My advice would be to replace it with something as similar as possible, since that's how you will usually get the most water-resistant seal.
This is cogent advice.

Thanks for the feedback folks.

My watch says 7009-465L on the dial, but I assume that's the designation of the dial. On the 7009-3041.

I found an item on ebay titled "MINERAL CRYSTAL FOR VINTAGE SEIKO 7009 7S26 PART NUMBER 310W17LN"


The description suggests that this should be a match (it lists several 7009 models, including my 7009-3041), but I can't find any manual online which says whether part #310W17LN is indeed the correct original part.

Expert opinions?:)
There are two approaches I see with this. The first is to take a chance on the Fleabay listing you see, then get yourself a set of really good calipers. Not cheap ones. Gunsmiths or sporting goods retailers carry good ones, though finding one in metric (not empirical) can be difficult. Or get one off of Esslinger.com or something.

1. Measure the outside diameter. Do it many times, rotating the crystal a little bit each time. You will get varied readings. Maybe take an average of all of them if you're getting some drift in the measurements.

2. Measure the thickness of the sides. Same approach. Don't do it in just one place.

3. Measure the dome height (if any).

All three of these measurements can be spec'd out and replacements should be available, even if it's not official Seiko crystal. Lots of sapphire vendors out there.

If it were me, I would strongly urge you to call up jewelers near you and inquire if they can do the work for you. That's how I roll now. I'm so sick of screwing this up (I'm about 50/50 success rate), so I just pay someone else to do it who has the know-how and tools. The tools part is important - getting the right tools is very expensive. Whatever you do, do NOT just go get the $10 crystal press from Fleabay or Amazon that all the YouTube modder guys use (most of them re-assemble the watch incorrectly anyway, and it's cringe-worthy to watch). Those cheap crystal presses are notoriously misaligned and can apply uneven pressure, and if that happens, your watch will fog up with nominal temperature fluctuations. Don't ask me how I know that...
 
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