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The triangle at 12 is mssing. The old Flieger watches had no date window and a hw movement. Swiss Army has no Flieger history at all.
 

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I notice the OP didn't ask if it was a flieger or not. While WWII fliegers shared a set of defining features, the definition of "pilot's watch" is really open to interpretation. Most literally, you could say it's a watch that belongs to a pilot. By this definition, there are probably more timex and casio digital pilot's watches than anything else!

You could decide is to go by the classifications provided by the manufacturer. If you believe what Breitling and Fortis have to say, then THEIR watches are definitely pilot's watches and this lowly deal-of-the-day special is definitely NOT. How much faith do you have in advertising, though?

Alternatively, there are certain features that are thought of as prototypical of a "pilot's watch." Some of these things are included for their utility, such as anti-magnetic protection, a domed anti-reflective crystal, and a brushed, bead-blasted, or coated finish (I think it's fair to be skeptical, though, that there are lots of pilots these days that rely mainly on a watch to tell the time). Other features are included for their historical value and stylistic, such as a hand-wind movement, certain shapes and colors of hands and faces, and rivets on the strap.

But knowing which features are commonly associated with pilot's watches doesn't get us any closer to a definition, since we're still left wondering which ones are critical, and how many are needed before the threshold is crossed and some sort of Gestalt transformation occurs to make an ordinary watch with a black face and white numerals and a leather strap... into a Pilot's Watch. You could re-define the notion of a watch's "pilotness" as a scale or gradient instead of a category, which would be useful for making relative judgments (this watch is more "piloty" than that one) but not classifications.

I would ask myself: why am I looking for a pilot's watch in the first place? Is it because you need a timing instrument while you're flying? Is it because you have romantic notions associated with aviation (I do)? Is it because you are interested in collecting historical memorabilia? Try to figure out what it is that interests you about pilot's watches and then see if you are getting that out of any particular watch. For me, a pilot's watch provides a unique sense of adventure and nostalgia associated with some notions about a life I wish I could live in a bygone era. Call it silly, but that's what I'm looking for in a pilot's watch so that's what I'm going to base my classifications on.

So is the Garrison a pilot's watch? By my way of slicing the cake I would say no, though it comes close. But since nobody's criteria for what makes a pilot's watch is more correct than anyone else's, you get to decide for yourself! How about this: are you a pilot? If so, then buy whatever watch you want and call it a pilot's watch. Take a picture with it at the yoke (stick?) and I promise nobody will argue with you. ;-)
 

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Oh, and if you're interested in a cheap watch that's a little more "piloty" than the Victorinox Garrison, Wenger (now "Swiss Army," I think) made a basic Aerograph watch that can be had for not too many bucks.



Picture from Amaaaazon
 

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the first one it'a sort of Hammy Hommage or, better, styled watch....
if you like it it does have some military "field" character.....
but for a pilot-like you have to search in the garrison direction.....
:-!
 
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