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Discussion Starter #1
When a watch to be judged as a military wrist-watch?
I have a vintage Meyer's & Son, I think it is military watch, but how is your opinion?


 

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That is actually what is sometimes considered a "doctor's watch."

The design elements usually associated with "doctor's watches" are: red second hand, numbered second scale (often seen with fifth second tick marks,) and a clear uncluttered light colored face.

Aside from the red second hand the face color, these same elements are also used to define "military-style" watches.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That is actually what is sometimes considered a "doctor's watch."

The design elements usually associated with "doctor's watches" are: red second hand, numbered second scale (often seen with fifth second tick marks,) and a clear uncluttered light colored face.

Aside from the red second hand the face color, these same elements are also used to define "military-style" watches.

Thanks lysanderxiii, I think doctor's watch is more possible than military due to the dial color is not black. Great comments! :)
 

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Hi -

I thought that doctor's watches fell into two categories:

a) older vintage wrist watches with seperate dials in an elongated case, upper dial minutes and hours, lower dial seconds. This was sold at least by Gruen and Rolex as doctor's watches (Rolex Prince) and was designed for a doctor's need to see an accurate seconds count, which isn't really possible with most contemporary watches of the time period (1920s-1940s).

b) watches with a pulse scale so that a doctor doesn't have to calculate the proper pulse, just count the number of pulses up to a certain point as the second hand moves across.

Or are you saying that my vintage Stowa with a second hand, light face, numbered scale to 60 with subticks is a doctors's watch? Or my vintage Pobeda as well?

JohnF
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi -

I thought that doctor's watches fell into two categories:

a) older vintage wrist watches with seperate dials in an elongated case, upper dial minutes and hours, lower dial seconds. This was sold at least by Gruen and Rolex as doctor's watches (Rolex Prince) and was designed for a doctor's need to see an accurate seconds count, which isn't really possible with most contemporary watches of the time period (1920s-1940s).

b) watches with a pulse scale so that a doctor doesn't have to calculate the proper pulse, just count the number of pulses up to a certain point as the second hand moves across.

Or are you saying that my vintage Stowa with a second hand, light face, numbered scale to 60 with subticks is a doctors's watch? Or my vintage Pobeda as well?

JohnF
That is the reasons I am confusing and asking. A doctor will not wear this cheap! A military is also not really like! But the Arabic numeral luminescent combined with the hands looked like military style.
 

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Hi -

Since I have several health care specialists in the family and know a few doctors, I think I can say this: doctors wear whatever they like. :)

They are more likely to wear a modern sports watch with all sorts of sensors (pulse, etc), or good old multifunction digital watches for multiple timings (I know that one that uses one that has about 10 different timing systems to keep track of billings!) than they would wear either of the above, unless, of course, they are watch freaks.

Seriously, I think that what you are seeing is that the watch you posted is a basic, utilitarian tool watch, one that lets the user easily and elegantly tell time. Nothing more, nothing less. :)

JohnF
 
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