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Not sure how you conclude "not so good" ... I also don't understand how you paint "IWC in-house movements" so broad, as this is one specific watch and not all of their movements...

Are there some flaws as pointed out? Yes.. Does IWC make poor movements? Absolutely not ..
 

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Absolutely - it's a weakness in the auto winder construction of one particular movement. IWC makes great movements with impressive detail and performance.
 

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This guy is a tool. The pelleton winding system is one of the most proven winding systems out there. A jewel fell out - that's the problem, not the winding system.

I notice no mention of the rate ... Which is reported pretty bad on these long PR movements. The isochronism on my IWC was terrible - off by about 5 mins in the first day wearing it.
 

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(A reprint of what I posted today - January 2, 2014 - on the IWC Forum)

From time to time (pun intended) I come across and read less than kind criticism, from consumers and watchmakers alike, regarding the construction and quality of IWC’s movements. Their negative remarks cover both modified and the current in-house movements made by IWC.

As a watchmaker myself, I suppose I have a built in tendency to be critical if I find a weak point or design flaw within any mechanical movement. So, it would be very easy for me to jump on the band wagon of naysayers were it not for the fact for my many years of experience working with the IWC company. That unique privilege of servicing their diverse calibres and timepieces on a daily basis gives me, I believe, a much more balanced analysis of IWC’s emphasis on quality control.

For example, IWC’s series of their in-house basic calibre C5000 continues to undergo modifications and revisions from the mainplate to wheels and operating levers. One of the most stressed parts in that series of movements is the pawl lever mounted and automatic device winding wheel. In the newer calibres the earlier bronze levers have been replaced with ceramic ones to ensure better longevity and performance. Such attention to detail undoubtedly costs the IWC company additional huge sums of money to cover everything from retooling, manufacturing new parts, keeping up a larger inventory, and, of course, providing up-to-date training with fresh technical information for their team of watchmakers worldwide.

In my professional opinion, this dedicated devotion to deliver the best of products illustrates that the company continuously strives to achieve precision par excellence. Moreover, it should demonstrate a contrary vision to their critics because no technical product can always be made 100% perfect to start with prior to actual usage by consumers over several years. The fact that IWC, behind the scenes, works hard to also update timepieces sent in for repairs with new revised parts where necessary is a testament to true commitment to their products.

There are not many other companies that go that extra mile. Owning an IWC timepiece is also an investment to consumers supported by a company which cares about them and puts their money on the line as proof of that. I think that most IWC fans already realize this. And, for the others out there I hope my words are reassuring and food for thought.


Wishing all forumners a happy and healthy 2014,
Jack Freedman
 

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Thank you Jack, for providing a well thought-out commentary to IWC's movements, especially from someone who has inside knowledge of the company.

Their strategy of continuously improving and incorporating the new changes to older watches when they are in for service seems to be in line with the observation here. That the older 5001 having terrible isochronism and accuracy issues are seeing improvement after sending in for service, and the newer ones seem to be having better results.

Happy New Year to you too!
 

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One failed part and the guy trashes IWC? Unless this is some sort of inherent flaw in the design (as opposed to a random failed part), the guy's way off base.
Wouldn't want the same type of "one failed part "on any airplane I am on ... Get my point
 

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A typical, self entitled consumer who believes that it's rational and justifiable to trash a product just because he had a bad experience with it, completely ignoring all of the other positive feedback that disprove his claims. This is pretty common, especially on the Internetz. Lots of whiners telling us Brand X is terrible because his ONE example (heaven forbid, two or even three!) had problems.

I gotta admit that I've been guilty of this also. Trashed the Seagate Momentus XT because both failed on me :D I wouldn't recommend it personally.
 

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A typical, self entitled consumer who believes that it's rational and justifiable to trash a product just because he had a bad experience with it, completely ignoring all of the other positive feedback that disprove his claims. This is pretty common, especially on the Internetz. Lots of whiners telling us Brand X is terrible because his ONE example (heaven forbid, two or even three!) had problems.

I gotta admit that I've been guilty of this also. Trashed the Seagate Momentus XT because both failed on me :D I wouldn't recommend it personally.

If (heaven forbid) 2 or 3 is not sufficient to proclaim 'inferior status', then exactly how many are required?
 

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Airplanes have failed parts all the time, what's your point? Any mechanical machine, (no matter how good) will at some point have parts fail. I bought a brand new BMW few months ago and the engine over heated the next day.

From my experience IWC makes very nice watches. (Fit and finish as well as movement.) IWC is not in the same class as PP, AP, VC but they are still quality high end watches in my book.
 
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