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Discussion Starter #1
The number inside the back case is 422536. There is a large 3 and a smaller 4 just above this number. It's .800 silver. the weird part is that there is a very small engraving on one side. It looks like $30888. the last two 8s are a little smaller than the other numbers. Underneath that it says W6421. At least I think that is what it says, even with magnification it is very hard to read. The $ sign makes no sense at all. This watch was either my father's or my grandfather's. I found it among my mother's things after she passed away in 2000. The watch still runs and so far looks like it is pretty accurate. If someone can tell me how to post pics, I'll be glad to take some. Tried to post a pic in the TAG Heuer forum, but all I got was the obnoxious X. :think:
 

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Make sure you are in the Advanced message mode.
You'll see a button called Manage Attachments which allows you to upload from your PC but make sure the file size is not too large. 200KB should be OK.
 

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Hi tadpole59,

in most cases, case numbers tell simply nothing about date and origin of
a watch. Pease read this for further infomation:
http://www.ranfft.de/uhr/info-e.html#D1

By accident, I have a Junghans with similar set of numbers in my list, and
probably comparing it with your watch helps a little further:
http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun.cgi?10&ranfft&a&1ustu&1198684827

I believe, the 34 in yours as well as mine is a kind of model number, and the
rest a serial number. Don't give too much importance to the different sizes
of digits: the most probable reason is that the maker picked up the wrong
stamp for one or the other.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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Discussion Starter #4
WOW. das sieht aus wie die gleiche Uhr.
It looks like the same watch, absolutely amazing. I don't know how to open it to see the movement. Don't really want to try since I am afraid to damage it. Do you have provenance with yours that could date it? As I said, I found mine in my mother's belongings after she passed away. I do not recall seeing my father with it, I left Germany in 1964, he could have had it after that.

Vielen Dank fuer Ihre Hilfe,
Ingrid Sanders
 

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Hi Ingrid,

if you look to the back of the watch with the stem up, somewhat right from
the stem there is a slot between case and back cover. You can press a
knife blade into this slot to popp off the back. Under it there is a second
cover, which can be opened the same way. But pay attention: If you close
the covers again, never press on the center, but rather with your thumbs
left and right on the edge of the cover.

Junghans used separate serial numbers for every calibre (movement model),
and most records about them are lost. So the only way to estimate the
manufacturing date is the style of case, dial, hands, and the movement
design. The design of my example is typical for the early twenties, but as
Junghans was a little condervative that time, the watch is more probably
from the mid twenties, possibly even the late twenties.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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With older pocket watches, I find that a fingernail is usually sufficient to open the inner (and outer) covers. Much less damaging potentially than a knife!

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks again, Roland. I got it open. Hope the pics give you an idea. I have since noticed that it will stop working unless handled...like it needs a nudge every once in a while. Is it worth to have it serviced and get it unstuck?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I tried that first, only broke a nail...LOL. I actually had a tool that was made for this, there were already marks on the watch from someone (my dad?) opening it.
 

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It's always a good idea to have an older watch cleaned and lubricated if you intend to run it. Cost for this varies but in general should be around $100 US.
If you don't intend to get it serviced right now, put it away and don't wind it. Running a watch dry or dirty can destroy the working parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Appreciate all the expert advice, gentlemen. I think I'll put it up for now. When I give it to my son some day I will have it cleaned first.
 

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Hi Ingrid,

can't read the movement designation in your photo, but I guess it is 33 with
any extension, probably 33a.

It has the same dimensions like the movement in my comparison watch,
and belongs to the same family of models, which differ in design of the
bridges, number of jewels, and quality of the escapement. The calibre 31
in my watch is the lowest grade with only one jewel, while yours is of
moderately higher grade with 7 jewels, and easier to service due to the
separate bridges instead of one plate for all wheels.

Some further informations about the movement are here:
http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&a&2uswk&Junghans_J33
Don't worry about the slightly different appearance. The reason is that my
archive photo shows the version made for Alpina.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Once again, thank you for all your help and advice. I'm going to Maryland tomorrow to spend a week with my kids and grandkids so won't be around.
I wish you a very Merry Christmas und einen guten Rutsch ins Neue Jahr!
 

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Once again, thank you for all your help and advice. I'm going to Maryland tomorrow to spend a week with my kids and grandkids so won't be around.
I wish you a very Merry Christmas und einen guten Rutsch ins Neue Jahr!
Dankeschön, gleichfalls! All the best and see you next year!

Hartmut Richter
 
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