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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
100_0751.JPG This watch belonged to my Grandfather watch who passed away, it is most likely a World War 2 bring back.

It's running and keeping good time for the last 24 hours.

It is a DOXA, right around 50mm. And on the inside cover it has numbers #213374 with a 55 underneath the top numbers.

Not sure if it is stainless steel or silver (how can I tell)?

Any info would be helpful!! :)

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Hi

I'm not a pocket watch person, but the case is marked Metal Argentan - otherwise known as German silver which is an alloy of copper, zinc and nickel:

German Silver Or Argentan
 

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If you're actually planning on using the watch, get it serviced. Otherwise it'll end up as a really pretty paperweight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you're actually planning on using the watch, get it serviced. Otherwise it'll end up as a really pretty paperweight.
Why will it end up a paperweight? Don't understand the comment?

I will end up getting it serviced because it belonged to my Grandfather.
 

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Because mechanical watches are not unlike cars, in that they use lubricants to protect the metal bits that rub against one another from wearing away. So if it hasn't been serviced in a long time, it's like running a car without changing the oil; it can cause the metal bits inside to break. Keep in mind that unlike a car engine, the metal bits inside the watch are, in many cases, less then a quarter of a milimeter wide; it doesn't take a great deal of wear to break them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Because mechanical watches are not unlike cars, in that they use lubricants to protect the metal bits that rub against one another from wearing away. So if it hasn't been serviced in a long time, it's like running a car without changing the oil; it can cause the metal bits inside to break. Keep in mind that unlike a car engine, the metal bits inside the watch are, in many cases, less then a quarter of a milimeter wide; it doesn't take a great deal of wear to break them.

Thank you, that is great advice. Will get it serviced as soon as I can.
 

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Vint. Forum Co-Moderator
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I'm sure that "Manufacture des Montres Doxa" had its reasons to mark this movement in their catalog like cal. 2-19/12,and not like FEF 1-18.5'''H5.Rgds!
I'm sure that they did. I know nothing about Doxa but there was a reason that Swiss ebauche makers made sure not to mark their name where customers could see it. This has now changed and it is easy to read the calibre numbers under the balance wheel.
 

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Why will it end up a paperweight? Don't understand the comment?

I will end up getting it serviced because it belonged to my Grandfather.
I was in a really crappy mood when I posted that comment, so allow me to be a bit more in-depth.

If something is a 'paperweight', it means it's worthless. It's only useful for holding down paper (hence 'paperweight').

That is all your watch will be good for, if you don't get it serviced. If you run the watch without oil in it, all the gears and pivots and wheels are gonna grind up against each other and wear out. Think of this: The watch does 5 ticks a second, 60 seconds in a minute. So that's 300 ticks in a minute. 60 minutes in an hour. So that's 18,000 ticks in an hour. That's about 430,000 ticks in a 24-hour period.

Every tick is the balance-wheel spinning back and forth. Every tick is the cogs and wheels moving and ratcheting forward one space each time.

Imagine doing that without oil. Imagine doing it hundreds of thousands of times in a single day. Multiply that by weeks...months...years...

Pretty soon, the watch will just wear out.

This is why oil is important.
 

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In my experience, that generally means very little. I have a Baume & Mercier watch with a Cal. BM 12600 as engraved on the movement. It is actually a Buren Cal. 1001A. The circle with the "BAA" (Buren's hallmark) under the balance wheel has been drilled away. And there are many cases, old and new, of makers trying to hide the origin of their movements by redesignating them.....

I am not saying that it is impossible that Doxa made this movement themselves. What I find rather strange, though, that at least reverse side wise, these movements are such close copies of the FHF (not FEF) movements, down to the details such as position of bridge screws and shape and position of lever cock. Either Doxa made a perfect copy of an FHF movement (in which case it isn't really a Doxa movement in my books), or they actually got the ebauche from FHF (perhaps refining it a little themselves to justify their own designation) - or there is something rather fishy going on.....:-s

Hartmut Richter
 
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