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I download the Iphone Kello. It seem like it pretty spot on with the atomic clock and the what I got from the RSC.

I was wondering what others think of this app ?
 

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I've had mixed results - I'll need to give it another go in a dead quiet environment - but I noticed that adjusting the amplification makes a big difference on measurement consistency.
 

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Has anybody pitted the latest version against dedicated watch timing machines? E.g.
  • Vibrograf B200
  • TYMC MTG-1000

Doesn't the accuracy of the app depend on the hardware timer in the iPhone/iPad/iPod? How do we know if it's any good?
 

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I have in installed on an Iphone 4, using the built in mic. I think it sucks.
My T1000 works fine, and is light years better.
 

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It's pretty much useless because it requires manual calibration of the microphone, which creates highly distorted and variable measurements of accuracy. You have absolutely no idea if you're getting an accurate reading or not. I originally thought it might be useful for helping to pick the best watch at an AD, but after testing it against my timegrapher I realized it's useless.
 

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It's pretty much useless because it requires manual calibration of the microphone, which creates highly distorted and variable measurements of accuracy. You have absolutely no idea if you're getting an accurate reading or not. I originally thought it might be useful for helping to pick the best watch at an AD, but after testing it against my timegrapher I realized it's useless.
So, you bring your Timegrapher to pick out your new watch? I wonder what my AD would say about that...
 

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So, you bring your Timegrapher to pick out your new watch? I wonder what my AD would say about that...
I've never bothered to bring in my own. I simply ask the AD (if he has more than one in stock of the watch I'm interested in) to put them on his own timegrapher so I can make a decision about which one to take. I've never been denied.

A timegrapher does a lot more than just measure accuracy. When you know how to interpret the data, it can help identify problems with the mechanism.
 

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Alright, because I'm stuck at home with the flu for days now I gave into my curiosity to test this thing. As far as I can tell, with an iPhone 5, and the include headset taken fresh out of the box for the first time, it's just...bizarre.

I've just spent ten minutes with it with my most consistent watch, my AT8500, which hits almost exactly +1 a day no matter what, so I thought it'd be good for fine tuning. I manually selected the frequency.

At the medium amplification that it came set with, it was saying it ran somewhere between 13 and 14 seconds fast a day. By turning up the amplification, it was running -4 a day. So there's an 18 second range, depending on whatever "amplification" you'd like. How do you know which is right? Beats me.

I guess I'll try it with the GS, but it'll probably be running -40 a day or something on this.

Save yourself the 8 bucks. You can still test your watches quite reliably on your own, either on the wrist or off.
 

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I had to literally hold the watch's crystal up against the mic (on the Apple earbuds the 4S comes with) to get a steady signal. Doing this got me in the ballpark (I was manually regulating my SKX171) and from there, I'd wear it till I thought it had a full wind and then track the accuracy for a full 24 hours and make more adjustments. Kello was actually pretty helpful (it would show me if i made a big change or a small one with each adjustment), but like others said, it was inconsistent with its readings. I'd take 3 or 4 and average them together essentially, lol. Got my SKX from -15 to +5 per day though! I'd call it a novelty app, not much more.
 

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alright decided to give this thing a better chance. Read some articles on how to fine tune this thing. So it's locked in my shower with the Omega for 10 minutes set exactly as I'm told it should. If that's can't do it, thing's done for.

Ok, in test #1, it came out to 0.5 seconds/day dial up, which is reasonably close to the reality. However, I decided to test it crown up. To do so, I held the mic near the back of the watch. The only way I could get any signal at a reasonable amplification (i.e., not pick up my breathing etc) was to hold it against the watch, so I taped it on there. Came back in ten minutes, and it is just saying no signal. When I taped it on, it had signal and was doing fine (apparently). No idea what transpired. But if I can't test positional accuracy, I don't even really know what this would be good for...that's what I really want to know. I don't want to have to do 48+ hours of testing in 6 positions. I can, I just don't want to. It'd be nice to be able to run this for 10 minutes on each and in an hour you find what position is fastest and slowest, then you just toss it in that position to compensate for the rate results I experience day to day. Alas, this doesn't seem realistically possible with Kello. I'll probably do one more test with it on my GS tomorrow and see
 

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Is there anything similar for Android? Preferably a free version as i can't purchase anything for now...
 

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I have it and use it, and it does what it does.

It reports a moving average, so you have to leave it in position for at least a full minute until the reading really stablizes.

The best way to get consistent readings is to use the iPhone headset. Hold the watch with the dial facing a soft cloth, with the microphone part of the headset held sensor-down on the back of the watch by your thumb. I have a sandwich of fingers, soft cloth, watch (dial resting on cloth), microphone, thumb. With that, I get consistent measurement on even my quietest watches. I do that in my home office, which has all sorts of computer-fan noise, heating system noise, and some noisy 1-Hz ticking from a cheap quarts desk clock nearby. It has worked on all the mechanical watches listed below.

But the trick is to understand that it is a moving average.

With the vintage EBEL, the watch ran several minutes fast each day. I kept track of that for a week, and determined the average daily error. That was about 120 seconds. I then removed the back, laid the watch dial down on soft cloth, held the microphone down onto the case using my left thumb, and used tweezers in my right hand to move the regulator. Before touching the regulator, I measured the error. Dial-down, it was +50. So, since I new I needed to change it by 120 s/d, I regulated it to read -70 (50 minus 120 equals -70). Because it displays a moving average, I spent a minute after each adjustment to allow the reading to stabilize. The watch needs service and suffers from a lot of positional variation, so how it runs will depend strongly on how it's worn and wound. But it has been keeping about +15 s/d since I regulated it. Considering the positional variation and the degree to which it was out of regulation, that seems to me a good outcome, and validation that Kello works to a reasonable degree. (The watch is on its way to be serviced.)

Kello also shows the audio waveform, so if a watch has an inconsistent beat, where the balance is ticking more loudly on one pallet jewel than the other, that's easy to see.

No, it's not a tool for real work, but I find it's worth what it costs and does have some value for evaluation the general operation of a watch. But like all marginal tools, it has to be used carefully.

Rick "who has tested it with movement beat rates from 21,600 to 36,000" Denney
 
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... it is just saying no signal.
That reflects the majority of my experiences with the app. Neat idea, but the HW on/with the iPhone doesn't seem up to the task (I’m guessing it's not a SW issue).
 
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That reflects the majority of my experiences with the app. Neat idea, but the HW on/with the iPhone doesn't seem up to the task (I’m guessing it's not a SW issue).
That was a problem for me, too, until I started actually using the ear-bud headset supplied with the iPhone (and really plug it in all the way). When I press that against the watch case (with it otherwise damped from the surroundings using cloth and my fingers), it reads the beat reliably in my experience. I've tested it with most of the watches in my sig, even several that tick so quietly that I have a hard time hearing them when they are pressed against my ear. I have an iPhone 4. So, what am I doing right that others are doing wrong?

Rick "who has used the iPhone for real-time-analysis, too, with reasonable accuracy above 200 Hz" Denney
 

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Is there anything similar for Android? Preferably a free version as i can't purchase anything for now...
Another option is Clock Tuner, there is a free version. Seems pretty good so far. 5 minute average for my 7S26 is 21598BPH. Just need to fiddle around with the settings a bit to get it to work.
 
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