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Someone in Italy claims that Lanco watches are not collectible because they are low quality products.
I cannot certainly deny that the average production was in some way penalized by the use of chrome cases, but this was a fairly common practice. The in house movements were perhaps not "refined", but they equipped robust watches that had to be on the wrist of normal people for normal daily use.
However, the company was not so scarce if it produced - for example - the only alarm watch whose functions are all regulated solely by the crown. Omega also had the same opinion and for almost ten years tried to acquire the company, succeeding only in 1970, almost a hundred years after the Langendorf birth.
That merger brought the "Idea Watch" in dowry to Omega/SSIH, a watch with a plastic movement from which derived the Swatch, savior of the Swiss watchmaking and the Tissot Astrolon.

As usual, generalizations don’t work and an assessment of individual products should be made before throwing an entire brand into the trash.

Here are some examples that I consider worthy of attention

FB stainless steel case













Almost 80 years, chrome case, diameter 39,5mm














Maybe this is inspired by a Prince ...but I think with a lot of dignity, even in the nickel/chromin poverty
















A beautiful black dial in a generously sized case, 26x36mm












Another stainless stell "giant"; 23x46mm



Two-tone dial













And here is the famous alarm watch; how much would such a dial cost today? Diameter 36mm
















I hope these watches are always considered not collectible, so I can buy them at great prices :-d
 

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If someone in Italy, somewhere between Alto Adige and Sicilia, claims 'that Lanco watches are not collectible because they are low quality products', they could add onother 250 brands to the list of similar quality. Perhaps someone had a bit too much of vino rosso.

This one from my collection is an automatic from 1973 (the year of their 100th anniversary and the year they had to close the shop), with an Omega movement caliber 148, when Lanco was part of the Omega/Tissot group.
 

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Lanco was founded in 1873 by Victor Kottmann.

In 1887, they became so successful (after some troubled years before), that they couldn't meet the demand for their products. A few years after, they were most likely the largest producers of watches IN THE WORLD.

Kart Kottmann died suddenly and unexpeted in 1890. Lucien Tièche took over, the head of production, until Ernst Kottmann came along in 1902, but due to health reasons, he had to step down again. His brother Rudolf Kottmann had to take over. In 1964 Guido Kottmann was head of the board of management, just because Hans Kottmann was killed in a car accident.

In 1970 they became part of the Omega/Tissot group and made it to their 100th anniversary in 1973, the year they closed the shop.
 

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I only have the one Lanco but it’s a little beauty





Okay it’s only a plated case but at the time it was made, mid 1940’s at a guess, that was nothing unusual and it’s held up really well for a seventy year old. The combination of water and shock proofing would have made this quite a desirable little watch in its day.

Matt


Brought to you by HYPNOTOAD
 

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Another thumbs up for Langendorf/Lanco from me.
I only have one watch of theirs though.
A nice condition 1950`s model
IMG_20171210_123640729.jpg IMG_20170622_142255026.jpg calibre 1027.jpg

As a Roamer watch fan I was interested to read some time ago that the two men involved with the foundation of MST(later to become called Roamer ) had worked at Kottmann`s (later becoming Langendorf) and Langendorf .
That info coming courtesy of Mirius`s website.
 

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Hi there,

Someone in Italy claims that Lanco watches are not collectible because they are low quality products.
As the posts indicate, this is a pretty narrow oppinion.

Surely Langendorf (Lanco), formerly was one of the biggest manufacturers of medium and high grade watches. But they were acquired by the SSIH (today Swatch Group) in 1973. And the SSIH had a large gap between their top brands Omega, Tissot, and their bottom brands Agon, Buler. And there they placed Langendorf. So Langendorf continued with enhanced pinlevers, but also watches with down.graded Tissot movements, both not actually electrifying collectors.

But even a Lanco ladies pinlever like this wasn't yet the bottom of the scale:





The decay of the brand Lanco met the enhancement of pinlevers still at the beginning of the quartz crisis. Many got cap jewels just for fun, i.e. these only covered holes. But in Ronda movements like this the cap jewels actually provided axial bearing of pivots and improved oil keeping. These movements can compete with Swiss-lever movements refering durability, but of course not refering accuracy.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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It certainly does not bother me that Lanco is considered a second-grade brand by some. I was able to pick up this blocky Lanco chrono from the Omega/Tissot era for dirt cheap. All stainless, integrated bracelet and decent finishing with a great dial and minimal wear. Plus it keeps time.
 

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