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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
i am trying to determine movement on one of my watches.It is single button chronograph, so it would really help me if someone can upload,or put a link for a good picture,or drawing of Hahn Landeron cal.2 movement.I have this drawing but some parts of the movement are missing on it, also cal.2 is on the left side of drawing.I would be thankful for any info about this movement like year of production, witch brands use that movement,etc...
 

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Post a pic and help will arrive!
 

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Ok ,here is a pic of my watch movement.It is very similar to Hanhart cal 40/50 single button chrono but its not Hanhart this one is Swiss made( on the movement under the dial plate is stamped : brevet + 5414).So i found that Hahn Landeron cal 2 was inspiration for Hanhart movement, and i guess that is what im looking for.
 

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Ah ,that pic on Toms page is ... not clear enough.Anyway here is the pics of the movement on the dial side.Also as i done my homework on this investigation of Landeron Hahn , i found that #brevets des montres of Swiss# ,that means patent for watch in Swiss by the number 5414 that is tamped on watch ,means that the patent is assigned between year 1896-1898.But both Landeron Hahn anh Hanhart were in Swiss at that time ( Hanhart relocated his factory in Germany in 1902).It is 35 mm in diameter, so it fits in 15 1/2 lignes.Drawings that I posted i found on
GERMAN MILITARY WATCH FORUM - It wasnt really an Hanhart.....
Also very ,very useful site is doc.rero.ch
Archive of Swiss horological society. La Fédération horlogère suisse : janvier 1900- décembre 1940. Much of material can be found there.Just select newspapers and in search type: montres.
I still waiting for some nice pics of that movement , and brands that use that movement,so anyone?
 

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I'm not going to be much help, but I do thank you for the doc.rero.ch reference... great source of info!

Once a design goes out of patent anyone can use it and modify it as they wish. So slight variations of the same movement can just begin to crop up. Another source of variation during patented years is Swiss movements could be bought in almost any form of assembly from parts to semi-completed ebauches... once sold, anything can happen.
 
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