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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought this one on my trip to Cracov today at noon. I don't know much abot English watch makers, but as the presentation states, it was made in 1925.
In fact I was pretty sure to find a Swiss movement in there, as I believed English did not make pocket watch movements in 1925 any onger, but I found an English 7j full plate inside.

It is a low grade, 7 jewel movement with expansion balance, no decorations whatsoever.
It is a well known movement very often seen in English watches from late 19th Century.

The model used to be fitted with fusee chain, but this late version - as far as I can see - has just a transmission gear instead. So it's wound in the opposite direction... I wonder why couldn't they simply engage the barrel with the center wheel, like in American watches, but maybe this extra gear still has some additional funcion in the movement - I just don't know...
I'm not willing to take that apart at this moment...

Anyway - the watch is worn, it clearly has fallen badly to the ground, taken by the damage seen, but all in all it's a nice, handsome and interesting antique as a whole, even more with this nice presentation note under the caseback.

Interestingly, the movement s/n is 748266, while the case s/n is 748166. I wonder if it's by mistake or was it supposed to be that way?

Also, the movement is marked Warranted English Lever, but as far as I can teel looking from the side, it has Swiss lever escapement ('English' style angle type so called)

Not very much of a timekeeper, but runs well enough, it sems...
 

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British Watch Co. was registered. in 1920 by William Erhardt see the site of David Boettcher.
Examples of British hallmarks in watch cases


British Watch Co LTD
of Time Works, 214 Barr Street, Birmingham

in association with William Ehrhardt with Office at 17 Hatton Garden, London.
• c1840 The company was established to manufacture watches by mass-production methods using machine tools designed by the Swiss craftsman P. F. Ingold.
• 1922 Listed Exhibitor _ British Industries Fair. Manufacturers of English Lever Watches, Watch Cases and Gramophone Motors. (Stand No. E.44) [1]
• The company failed owing to total opposition from the trade

GMCC.jpg

regards enrico
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
"Not much of a timekeeper" but one heck of a time capsule! :-!
Watches like this one remind me how much I like obviously all-original, historic pieces. I never get this much attached to recases, even if it's a re-cased Riverside Maximus or Veritas.
Cool, top grade movements, but not much of it's own 'spirit' so to say. There is something special about those watches with their own life story...
Time capsule is a very good way to express this feeling :)

BTW - I got to know (on NAWCC) that the GMC mentioned was Genreral Motor Carrying Company of Kirkcaldy, a bus company operating between 1913 and 1926. Is that a GMC bus on your photo :) ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Looks as modern as the watch of mine ;)
World surely was very different 100 years ago ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I could not help it - I had to see what's inside :)

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To find out - one has to remove the pin holding the movement in it's case. Frankly - I prefer the American way with swing out ring holding the movement rather than that, but so be it...

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Under the dial there is the click wheel, very nicely finished BTW, and the cannon pinion, hour and minute wheel.

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Balance off, barrel off, time to remove the top plate...

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barrel back on for just a short moment...

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The 'dummy barrel' is a simple transmission gear used to ensure the mainspring is wound in the 'proper' direction. Just a brass gear on a steel arbor, all joined together for good. Nothing special about it, except the fact, that it's there, of course...


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This watch has an expansion balance with flat hairspring and old-fashioned stud. I doubt anyone but the English still made such studs in 20th century ;)
The escape wheel is typical for Swiss lever escapement. I was told (and I don't know if it's true or not) that the pallet fork's end is what makes it English lever...

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Yes, compared to American angle escapements, this lever is shorter, the safety pin right next to the exit pallet, and it's visibly asymetrical.
It's partly steel, partly brass. Held together by two tiny screws. Single roller, of course, as you can see.


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On re-assembling, I replaced the non original screws with more proper, blued ones.

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Assembling - easy. Like in my beloved American full plates. Once again - those are considered difficult to assemble...
Like every time - I beg to differ ;)

That's it. All in al - low grade, but good quality movement.
 
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