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Wow!! Thanks Ben. Appreciate it.:):-!
 

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Thanks!:-!

Interesting in the english edition they put much focus on the Master Of G line, in the japanese edition they put most focus on the up-town models like MTG and MRG models.

wonder why?:think:
Someone mentioned that Casio might not be confident in their ability to sell the higher end MRG and newer MTG models outside of the Japanese market. My guess as to why the English language catalog is different, is that the G-Shock brand is currently heavily marketed toward the streetwear scene here in the U.S., where many G-Shock purchasers are hopping on a growing trend influenced by hip-hop musicians and streetwear clothing makers. The G-Shock appeal in the U.S. I'm referring to seems to be branching out from the urban streetwear and sneaker collecting subcultures. A scene that prides itself on limited edition models of sneakers, clothing, and now G-Shock watches. Individuals pay top dollar for collectible items, G-Shocks included, as evidenced by the LRG collaborations and price of the new LRG Frogman. While the price may be high for that, the Frogman has gained acceptance in the streetwear scene, while higher-end models such as the MTG have not caught on, and the highest-end MRG will likely never catch on with this crowd partially due to cost. A long-winded response, I know, but these are simply my observations and guesses.
 

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Someone mentioned that Casio might not be confident in their ability to sell the higher end MRG and newer MTG models outside of the Japanese market. My guess as to why the English language catalog is different, is that the G-Shock brand is currently heavily marketed toward the streetwear scene here in the U.S., where many G-Shock purchasers are hopping on a growing trend influenced by hip-hop musicians and streetwear clothing makers. The G-Shock appeal in the U.S. I'm referring to seems to be branching out from the urban streetwear and sneaker collecting subcultures. A scene that prides itself on limited edition models of sneakers, clothing, and now G-Shock watches. Individuals pay top dollar for collectible items, G-Shocks included, as evidenced by the LRG collaborations and price of the new LRG Frogman. While the price may be high for that, the Frogman has gained acceptance in the streetwear scene, while higher-end models such as the MTG have not caught on, and the highest-end MRG will likely never catch on with this crowd partially due to cost. A long-winded response, I know, but these are simply my observations and guesses.
What they think is one thing... what retailers are willing to pick up and display is another story all together...

Here in Canada 99% of the stores are displaying casios in stand up rotating covers similar to those where cheap watches reside. To sell a more expensive model they would need better display and fighting for retail space is anything but easy.

Awesome catalogue by the way. One of the best ones I've seen in quite some time.|>
 

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I think eb23air is right - they don't expect the expensive models to sell. Seiko are the same - the Spirits, Grand Seikos and Credors don't make it out of Asia either.

Sadly, I think Casio and Seiko are right. In Britain, if a Grand Seiko was displayed alongside Rolex and Omega, most people would choose the Rolex or Omega. If MR-Gs were displayed alongside Tag Heuers, most people would choose the Tag Heuers.

It takes enthusiasts like us to look beyond the 'expensive = Swiss' perception, and we are a relatively insignificant part of the market.
 

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The issue Casio is facing is not much different to the situation being faced by Seiko...

In general, the US consumer believes that a "good" watch is Swiss Made and only Swiss..

Seiko makes fine watches all the way up to the 4 and 5 digit range that at least rival their Swiss counterparts yet they do not market them here.

I believe they know that to do so they would most likely fail due to brand perception... In general the public here in the US see Seiko as a 1-300$ quartz/kinetic watch that is "nice" but not a "Movado" or something... haha

For them to start selling their Spirit line or higher would take a lot of marketing to convince the public that a $3K Seiko is worth it's asking price, even though many WIS's know that this is the case, we don't make up enough of the buying population to make a difference...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I think eb23air is right - they don't expect the expensive models to sell. Seiko are the same - the Spirits, Grand Seikos and Credors don't make it out of Asia either.

Sadly, I think Casio and Seiko are right. In Britain, if a Grand Seiko was displayed alongside Rolex and Omega, most people would choose the Rolex or Omega. If MR-Gs were displayed alongside Tag Heuers, most people would choose the Tag Heuers.

It takes enthusiasts like us to look beyond the 'expensive = Swiss' perception, and we are a relatively insignificant part of the market.
Good points, tribe, and I think you're right on the money. But Seiko/Casio/etc. are trying hard to change that perception, and it's probably working too (or else we wouldn't even be talking about it on this forum - a "small" population is a least a start, better than nothing ;-)).

It took Toyota a good deal of effort to make their brand successful, but now their Lexus models roll alongside the best of them. b-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Someone mentioned that Casio might not be confident in their ability to sell the higher end MRG and newer MTG models outside of the Japanese market. My guess as to why the English language catalog is different, is that the G-Shock brand is currently heavily marketed toward the streetwear scene here in the U.S., where many G-Shock purchasers are hopping on a growing trend influenced by hip-hop musicians and streetwear clothing makers. The G-Shock appeal in the U.S. I'm referring to seems to be branching out from the urban streetwear and sneaker collecting subcultures. A scene that prides itself on limited edition models of sneakers, clothing, and now G-Shock watches. Individuals pay top dollar for collectible items, G-Shocks included, as evidenced by the LRG collaborations and price of the new LRG Frogman. While the price may be high for that, the Frogman has gained acceptance in the streetwear scene, while higher-end models such as the MTG have not caught on, and the highest-end MRG will likely never catch on with this crowd partially due to cost. A long-winded response, I know, but these are simply my observations and guesses.
Interesting observations. Actually, it was I that voiced my guess on Casio's hesitation to bring MR-G line beyond the shores of Japan. Most of the MR-T models are hard to find even in other parts of Asia. But I think this is all part of Casio's plan - would they like to sell their high-end models (that generate more profit margin) to a wider audience? Sure, but they know they probably won't succeed yet.

They are following the very successful path that the Japanese automotive manufacturers paved in the past few decades. In one of my other threads, I mentioned my observation that the average price for G-Shocks seem to be increasing. These days, it is probably considered "acceptable" to pay $150-$175 for a solar/atomic G-Shock watch. A few years ago, this was probably not the case. Even $350 (list) for a GIEZ is OK for some people now. Ever so slowly, it will become more and more acceptable for people to pay $450-$500 for an MT-G.

My guess is that the MT-G and MR-G lines will be released globally, it's just a matter of time. :)
 

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My guess is that the $3K Casio or Seiko is a better watch than the $3K+ Rolex or Tag or ...
 
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