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Discussion Starter #1
I have read many of the post here about using a green 3M Scotch-Brite sponge for refinishing the metal clasp, and many people claiming excellent results; but it is not the best method. I know this because I have been brushing stainless steel with 3M pads for some time. They are actually sold at most auto stores and hardware stores without the yellow sponge backing, and are used in paint and body shops for a quick roughing before a re-spray.
A discerning eye will be quick to notice that the brush pattern is not a match to the original satin finish that a new Omega has. Knowing this I have been doing a lot of experimenting with different methods and abrasives (on beater watches of course, not my PO) looking for the easiest and best matching alternative.
Upon the advise of fellow forum member Ray K, I would like to post what I think should be the new standard "forum advise" for brushing a steel clasp. I tried the Norton sanding sponges pictured in this post https://www.watchuseek.com/showpost.php?p=628843&postcount=26 with the best results so far. I started with the 150 grit to brush out the scratches, then finished with the 320 grit to give the clasp that ever so slight satin shimmer that a new Omega has. The results have been pefect. I found this product to be available at Home Depot but not Lowes (sorry to the non US members, I don't know where to get them anywhere else).
Lets leave the dish sponges in the kitchen and off our prized watches:-!
 

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Thanks for the tip. I'll see if I can find the sanding sponges here in Canada when I get a chance, so I can touch up the clasp.

On another forum, someone used an acrylic nail file with pretty good looking before and after results too.
 

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Great tips. Those sanding sponges make perfect sense. Nice to know you have the experience with the proper grit. I'll run by the Despot when I get the chance, but holiday time around here is horrendous traffic. I'm trying to not leave the house until after the 1st, or only go out early in the week before 2PM.
 

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I too use Scotchbright to refinish my bracelets, but I do this using a two step process.

The first is obviously to use the Scotchbright to apply the brush finish. The second step, which I never hear anyone mention, is to burnish the finish with #0000 steel wool.

This works extremely well for adding sheen to the brushing.
 

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Scotchbrite has many products. I have been using a 2 step process with a coarse and fine scotchbrite pad for 7 years and perfectly duplicating the finish.

But my scotchbrite is not what is sold in Home Depot. I picked up my pads from a machine shop maybe 10 years ago and haven't been able to find new ones in retail stores.

I think no matter what you use the 2 step process is the key, the rough step applied first sets the grain and removes blemishes and a fine finishing step polishes and evens out the finish.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think no matter what you use the 2 step process is the key, the rough step applied first sets the grain and removes blemishes and a fine finishing step polishes and evens out the finish.
This is probally the most important fact, a two step process. Its funny how many strokes it takes from even the 150 grit to blend a brushed finish, makes you wonder how a smooth top desk adds the scratches back so quickly:-d

Now I'm off to find the perfect remedy for the polished sections. Cape Cod cloth gets a lot of nods in this category; any other suggestions? I have used chromium oxide (in the green brick form) for stropping knives and other fine polishing, I wonder if this would create a jewlers grade polish? I've only used it in functional applications but it did add a nice shine, especially to highly hardened blade steel.
 
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