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Would anyone who lives close to one of the MB6 towers please share any experiences.

How great is sync in proximity of an MB6 tower?
How strong is reception during different times of the day?
Can you manual sync any where, any time of the day?
If you move or walk around during sync, would reception stay strong?

Any info would be great.
 

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There was a guy who was a former member of f17 that had a YouTube channel on which he did thorough reviews of G-Shocks (can't remember his channel name, but it's gone now). As I recall, he lived in Cheyenne, Wyoming, which is about 45 miles north of Fort Collins, Colorado, where WWV and WWVB are located. He used to mention that he could get a successful L3 sync on his MB6 Gs at any time of the day.
 

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Mainflingen is 118 km away from my place of residence.
I can synchronize my clocks at any time of the day or night and also during movement. Weather has no influence either.

2016-Mainflingen-DCF-Mastfuss.jpg

Dcf77_edit.jpg

Near the Hessian town of Mainflingen in the municipality of Mainhausen (district of Offenbach) there are two large transmitters for long and medium wave. They are used for civil long-wave radio and especially for the transmission of the DCF77 time signal. With its range of over 2000 km, the transmitter covers the whole of Central Europe and controls an estimated 100 million radio clocks.


Long-wave transmitter
The long-wave transmission system, which is located on a completely fenced area, consists of twelve steel lattice masts insulated from the ground with heights of 100 to 220 metres, to which T and triangular surface antennas are attached. They are used by long-wave transmitters whose callsigns begin with DCF.


The best known of these transmitters is DCF77 for transmitting time signals on the 77.5 kHz carrier frequency. This time signal is generated by an atomic clock and controlled by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The transmission of time pulses began on 1 January 1959, initially only in the morning. In August 1970, 24-hour continuous operation was switched over. The signals correspond to the international time system UTC. The time information disseminated via DCF77 represents the legal time in Germany.


MFGIIIa.JPG

Kind regards
 

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Depending on how close to the tower you are the signal might actually go over you and you’ll need to “boost” your antenna (see WatchGeek’s YouTube vid) but you’ll only know for sure by trying it.
 

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Last year I was within half an hour of the US tower in Colorado. I could sync any time of day and it did it each time in two minutes (in other words, passing 59–00 seconds twice). It was a GW-M5610 if it helps.
 
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