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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello to everybody, I got a brand new PRW2500, due to Coronavirus quarantine I had my watch sitting down into the mailbox for about 1 month, then I finally had the chance to enjoy it.
I like the watch so much, but after about one week of careful use, I spotted two lints into the watch.
Of course I will try with official Casio repair service to claim a warranty cleaning, or a item warranty return with the seller, but in the event I will have to clean it myself, do someone has experience into this watch?
I mean, disassembly and reassembly. I’m very deep into mechanical watches overhauling, but I never had to challenge with such a digital, complex watch.
Any tips?
Eventually, suggestions about someone in EU who has reliable experience with those watches to send mine for cleaning? I bought this watch also for the WR200 rating and I want to save it.
Thanks!
 

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I opted to buy the cheaper prg-240 but i reckon the construction wont be shockingly different. I have been inside mine a few times and i wanted to share what i found when i tore inside.

IMG_7362.jpg

Once you are inside the case with the back removed, clear away the gel shock pad and get a good look at the insides. In my prg-240, the circle areas are where there are little tabs on the module that catch on the inside of the case to stabilize the module inside the case. A very slender and fine flat blade screw driver will do nicely to manipulate these tabs towards the module allowing the module to begin to lift free.

One other impediment to freeing the module from the case is the sensor ribbon connector in the triangle area. The flat brown guy on the left can be lifted and pivoted perpendicular to the circuit board. Doing so will release the contacts and allow you to pull the ribbon from the connector. I find it easiest to unseat/seat this ribbon connector as i'm removing/inserting the module from the case. It's easy to forget to return the brown tension lever down to its locked position.

There are also two gold springs on the front of the module on once side of the lcd that mates to two contacts behind the solar panels just inside the crystal. Make sure those springs dont go anywhere and that they seat correctly when you reassemble everything.

Also make sure all the pushers are not in a "being pressed" state when you reinsert the module, as the leaf springs on the module can get fetched up on the pusher posts.

Good luck, it's very possible to do this without screwing anything up. At least for me haha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your very clear explanation! I’m in touch with Casio Service shop so since it’s a brand new watch I’ll send it back for cleaning under warranty.
Did you open it to clean something? Did you have my same problem? Honestly in my large collection it’s the first time I find dirtY particles into a brand new watch. Not even in much cheaper watches I bought in the past. It’s disappointing and frustrating from my point of view.
 

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I bought my watch used, and part of my ritual when buying a used digital watch is to disassemble the case almost completely give everything a thorough cleaning and reassemble after applying some silicone grease to the gaskets, case back and pushers.

IMG_6806.jpg

Fun fact: A stunning amount of body hair, skin cheese and other various unspeakable debris collects in those cavities around and behind the buttons and outer case and case back. And that secondary plastic cover come to think of it. And around the rotating bezel. So good move buying a new example hahaha.
 

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Honestly in my large collection it’s the first time I find dirtY particles into a brand new watch. Not even in much cheaper watches I bought in the past. It’s disappointing and frustrating from my point of view.
My last job was in quality and manufacturing, and this is just something that happens. I can guarantee you casio is trying to stop this kind of thing from getting out of their doors, but they're a huge manufacturer of electronics and the quality cost to establish a robust system to stop this issue is probably not worth it to them. The smart money says casio did the math and decided it was cheaper to rework the affected watches. It's cynical but that's what usually motivates big businesses - MONEY. I wouldn't lose too much faith in casio so long as they're making a good faith effort to make sure good product is getting into your hands. and from the sound of it, they're working on it.
 
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