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Forgive me if this subject has been covered previously: I have done searches without finding an answer, and am fairly new here.

I own a few quartz watches, and have grown a bit tired of having the batteries replaced every other year or so. Is there a particular type or brand of battery that could be used that has a longer life, say 7-10 years?

I have seen ads for watches advertising 10 year batteries, but wish to know if the same battery would be usable in any quartz watch, or is it proprietary to a particular make and model only.

Many thanks in advance!
 

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Normal watch batteries last between 1-5 years depending of the watch and the physical size of the battery. The normal batteries are Silver-Oxide type, outputting 1.55V.
Long-lasting watch batteries last between 5-10 years depending of the watch and the physical size of the battery. These batteries are Lithium type, outputting 3V. Usually they are physically larger in size than the Silver-Oxide batteries.
As you can see the differences in sizes and outputting voltage make these batteries non-interchangable.
Occasionally you can find movements that can hold two different sizes of Silver-Oxide batteries. In that case the bigger battery is a bit thicker than the other one and it can be used if the watch-housing (case) has extra room for it. An example would be the ETA 965.152 movement that can be fitted with Renata 364 (thickness: 2.60mm) or Renata 377 (thickness: 3.12mm) batteries. The smaller one lasts for about 32 months, the bigger one lasts for about 45 months.
 

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Generally, Ronda quartz movement numbers ending with "Li," such as 715Li; and ETA/ESA movements with a "6XX" after the decimal, such as ETA 252.611, will use 3V lithium batteries, which should have around a 10 year life.
 

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What ETA says..

in its online documentation for the state of the art Thermoline movment (252.611), using a state of the art lithium battery, is that the current drain due to the needs of the movement is so slight that the natural untapped drain-down of the battery is the actual limiting factor in service life, in that case about 10 years.

Another way of putting this is that the shelf-life of the battery technology is what controls replacement intervals. With movememnt current requirements already at a practical zero, only improvement in battery life can improve performance.

It was not always thus, anyone remember the red led display by push button watches of the seventies? They ate batteries like hotcakes.
 

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Re: What ETA says..

ianyone remember the red led display by push button watches of the seventies? They ate batteries like hotcakes.
I think that was par for the course for all early electronic movements. My Seiko LCD 0634A-5019 chronograph from February 1976 munches a battery once a year or so, and faster if you use the night light too much. I've had it seven months had already had to replace the battery, the watchmaker I got it from told me the battery was about four months old when I got that watch.

Miao, Cat
 
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