WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I picked up my blackout Rangeman a few weeks ago and without a doubt it’s my favourite G-Shock.

Zero issues with the negative display. The triple sensor is surprisingly accurate. Barometer readings are pretty much 100%. Compass is bang on.

But. Whilst the temp sensor is also very good (see pic below) it only gives a meaningful reading off the wrist.

Please don’t get me wrong. I absolutely love this watch. But what’s the point of a temperature sensor that only gives an accurate reading of air temp when you’re not actually wearing it?

(Ps. Back on the wrist and it’s telling me it’s 28.5 c)

Anyone else find the same?





Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,632 Posts
To me it makes sense, if you do for some reason need a temperature reading, you wouldn’t want any false data coming off your body or being nobbled by your clothing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: memento_mori

·
Registered
Joined
·
341 Posts
I may be wrong, but I believe the recommendation is to remove the watch for up to 1 hour prior to attempting a temp reading in order to get an accurate ambient air temp. I guess you could calibrate the temp, meaning set it to a known temp while it’s on your wrist to compensate for the body hear error. So in your example above, if the watch reads say 30 deg while it’s on your wrist but you know the actual temp is 22, then just recalibrate the watch to read 22 and I would think that would work as long as your body temp didn’t rise. Not ideal I know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,644 Posts
I think the OP's point isn't that he's surprised necessarily that only gives an accurate reading while off the wrist. I think his point is, why even bother putting it on there in the first place if it doesn't work while you're wearing it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
Pretty sure the manual says it won't get an accurate reading while on the wrist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
I think the OP's point isn't that he's surprised necessarily that only gives an accurate reading while off the wrist. I think his point is, why even bother putting it on there in the first place if it doesn't work while you're wearing it?
I think it's something the sensor is already capable of, so they just give it a function. The primary purpose of the Rangeman is ABC; Altimeter, Barometer and Compass. Thermometer is just an extra function it can perform, the other three are far more valuable in most circumstances they would be needed anyway.

Besides, if they hadn't given you the ability to read temperature, someone would be on here posting "The Rangeman's sensor module is capable of getting temperature readings, why didn't Casio let us see it?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,054 Posts
If you tucked that big thermometer under your shirt and hugged it tightly for an hour, it would be off too. Radiant heat and all that, yeah? It’s an ABC watch, not an ABCT; it’s a cool add-on that has a caveat. At least it’s consistent off the wrist with the big one. This could easily have been an accolade thread about how accurate it is.

Cool watch. Enjoy and thanks for sharing it! They’re a little big for my wrist (6.5”) but I think they’re the bee’s knees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I think the OP's point isn't that he's surprised necessarily that only gives an accurate reading while off the wrist. I think his point is, why even bother putting it on there in the first place if it doesn't work while you're wearing it?
Yes, thank you. It is, after all, a wrist watch the other functions of which are all 100% operable whilst wearing it.

I do fully appreciate the limitations. Of course given where the sensor is placed and the fact that the watch itself will be heated by body temp is going to give a false ambient reading.

Could (or should?) Casio have placed the sensor perhaps where the light button is and insulated it in some way from the case?

Or even included a means of calibration to allow for body temperature, similar to that for true north on the compass?

It is clearly a very accurate instrument in isolation


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,082 Posts
I think the OP's point isn't that he's surprised necessarily that only gives an accurate reading while off the wrist. I think his point is, why even bother putting it on there in the first place if it doesn't work while you're wearing it?
It can still be useful. Strapped to the backpack, handlebars, put on a table, dashboard... it's a nice function to have even though it doesnt work on the wrist. My motorcycle dashboard doesn't have thermometer, barometer, altimeter etc and I'm always delighted to strap an ABC-T Casio to the handlebar on my trips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,088 Posts
Could (or should?) Casio have placed the sensor perhaps where the light button is and insulated it in some way from the case?
Wouldn't make any difference as your arm heats up the whole watch and not just the caseback.

They could use some kind of heat absorber or deflector on the caseback which would add several MM and £$ or maybe a microscopic drone that hovers above you sending BT info to the sensor?

It is what it is, handy extra feature the can be utilised anywhere after removing the watch from your very own heat source.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It's called body heat. Would you take the ambient room temp with a thermometer in your mouth.<br>
<br>
Any watch with temp feature will need at least 10-15 minutes to adjust. <br>
<br>
Sent from Capt Kirk's Communicator
Yes - I get that :)

I was more thinking out loud as to how useful it really is if you have to take it off for half an hour or so to get a meaningful ambient temp.

With modern insulation materials being as efficient as they are, and the Rangeman being the size it is, I was musing if Casio could have placed the sensor at the front and insulated it from the effects of body heat on the watch case itself (as opposed to insulting the whole caseback) Or to have a calibration feature based on body temp (given everyone's should be the same if healthy)

Give its accuracy (which is extremely good on my example) it seems perhaps a wasted opportunity?

A bluetooth drone as suggested by CC would of course be a welcome addition :-d (and yes, I got the sarcasm :):):))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
Yes, thank you. It is, after all, a wrist watch the other functions of which are all 100% operable whilst wearing it.

I do fully appreciate the limitations. Of course given where the sensor is placed and the fact that the watch itself will be heated by body temp is going to give a false ambient reading.

Could (or should?) Casio have placed the sensor perhaps where the light button is and insulated it in some way from the case?

Or even included a means of calibration to allow for body temperature, similar to that for true north on the compass?

It is clearly a very accurate instrument in isolation


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I had a watch years ago with a temperature sensor on the face. It still would read high because of body temperature.

There is a way to "calibrate" the Rangeman's thermometer. If you know how "off" it is constantly, you can hold adjust on the Baro screen and add or remove degrees. It will always show the temperature with an "offset", so if you take it off it will still show an offset.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,952 Posts
Its perfectly normal, all be it not convenient. As you obviously need to leave off wrist for 10 mins or so. I have a few temp G's , being on the wrist your body temp will effect it. same with any temp device if its resting on you(or anything 37oC warm).

Not tried it myself, so just thinking out loud. You could get several temps on wrist(maybe 2 or 3). Get same off wrist, and for example easily work out the factor. It may be the case you take away X degrees and you get pretty close to the temp on wrist. Again just a thought, if you dont need perfect temp readings. Might be easier long term if you plan on using the temp a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
986 Posts
I have a question, not about the ABC functionality. But, about the LCD on the new Blackout Rangeman, is it the same as the green Rangeman negative display? I have both negative and positive display Rangemans and can hardly see the negative on my green one. In the pictures this looks easier to see, does anyone have an opinion between the two? I have the GPS Rangeman and it’s super easy to see.

Thanks for the input.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,732 Posts
I have a question, not about the ABC functionality. But, about the LCD on the new Blackout Rangeman, is it the same as the green Rangeman negative display? I have both negative and positive display Rangemans and can hardly see the negative on my green one. In the pictures this looks easier to see, does anyone have an opinion between the two? I have the GPS Rangeman and it’s super easy to see.

Thanks for the input.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
the -3 ranger is probably one of the worse negs of all Gs, turn on the auto el or start working on your wristy twisty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
In the area of metrology, one thing you have to keep in mind is your measurement tools are very rarely perfect. Even when dealing with a tool that is singular in it's focus and purpose, you can introduce error in your measurements dependent on circumstances. The shape of the part you're measuring with vernier calipers can send your data off into the rhubarb. Your measurement device itself can mess up your data if it isn't properly cared for. And in this particular context, your body heat is gonna throw off your ambient temperature readings because you're using a digital wrist watch to tell you about the comfortable room you're sitting in. In a nutshell, I'm saying there's no easy way to have perfect measurements all the time even in a lab setting. I say this as a guy whose previous industry required me to send out all of our calipers, micrometers, gauge blocks, dial indicators, torque wrenches, and any other measurement tool out to a third party at our company's expense to verify that our readings were repeatable and reproducible.

My feelings on ABC watches like this are mixed. I feel the same way as you when contemplating the flaws and limitations of the sensor technology packed into your rangeman (i want one too someday), but at the same time I feel a sense of gratitude that casio even bothers developing them. We all have to appreciate how great our smart phones are in that regard, because they can kick the crap out of any watch i have in my collection in terms of function and features. I figure casio does this because they see that there's a bunch of persnickety nerds with watchbergers syndrome that gets frothy at the mouth over their watches (lord knows i still do).

Thanks for reading.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top