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I've been playing around with my DSLR (Nikon D3300) for a little while now, and I'm really enjoying it.

One thing I have no idea how to achieve it a good lume shot - not a photo of the lume in total darkness, but with the lume shining bright in a clear, low-light shot.

Any advice? What settings or techniques will help me succeed?
 

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Here are some things you should try:
- charge the lume (led torch works great)
- use a tripod
- set a slow shutter speed
- use the self timer or remote to take the picture
- focus on different parts of the watch
- take lots of shots, trial and error is the way


Sent from my ONE A2003 using Tapatalk
 

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Brad, I think you know I use a "bridge" camera ... a glorified point and shoot. For me it is finding the right spot to shoot. I actually use my downstairs bathroom because there is a skylight just in the hallway to let in a little natural light, and then I actually use the door to let in a very small amount of light (to regulate it I suppose, if you will). A little light can go a very long way if you are using a 12 - 15 second exposure time. Personally I don't like taking lume shots in total darkness. For these exposure lengths a tripod is a must and if your cam can use a remote shutter release it will help take steady shots. I had to hack mine with CHDK to use one, but it is worth the trouble to do. I use a 2 second delay as well just to make sure there is no shake in my cam when the shutter opens.













 

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I will post a few and give a hint or two...
1st thing is a tripod is essential. A nice macro lens with a dsl is nice as well, but probably not critical. I have all 3 so I am going to use them. Get everything all set up positionally with the lights on. Put your camera in (m) manual mode and now you get to play with your camera. ISO- Doesn't really matter all that much, just put it at 200 or 400, Aperature set to 4 or 5.6 or something just so everything is in focus, not really all that important either and now you are going to get to make adjustments to the amount of time the shutter is open (really important) This is what will affect what your shot looks like. They call this exposure compensation, but what is really happening is you are keeping everything else the same and adjusting the amount of light that is hitting the sensor by the amount of time the shutter is open.

Ok so all pics are the same set up. Everything identical except the amount of time that the shutter is open. 100mm macro lense on Canon DSL. F3.2, iso 400

1/4 sec


1.6 sec


4 sec


8 sec


It is really just a matter of playing with it for a bit to get what you want
 

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oops,
I forgot to mention about the lights. I charged the lume with the flashlight on my cell phone and once charged then I turned out the lights and started tinkering
 

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lol one more thing...
I use the timer feature as well. I think this helps a lot in keeping any movement of the camera
 

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In addition to settings, be mindful of moon light, moon angle, and other lights creepy into shot. I find the "noise" from fluorescent lighting, even 30 feet away to affect the result of photos.
 

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Storm Chaser Light Lume.jpg Storm Chaser Lume 1.jpg Storm Chaser Lume 2.jpg
I am messing around with a DSLR as well. I know nothing about photography but I was able to snap these just messing with the shutter speed. The first one was a little blurry because when I depressed the button it moved the camera. As mentioned above set the delay if you can.
 

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View attachment 12469609 View attachment 12469611 View attachment 12469613
I am messing around with a DSLR as well. I know nothing about photography but I was able to snap these just messing with the shutter speed. The first one was a little blurry because when I depressed the button it moved the camera. As mentioned above set the delay if you can.
I think I mentioned it in my post but along with the delay, if your cam has the ability to utilize a remote shutter release, I would highly recommend using that too. I had to hack my camera to be able to use one but it was worth it. It helps eliminate those blurry shots too.
 

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I think I mentioned it in my post but along with the delay, if your cam has the ability to utilize a remote shutter release, I would highly recommend using that too. I had to hack my camera to be able to use one but it was worth it. It helps eliminate those blurry shots too.
You are talking about a button that attaches to the camera with a cord that allows for the shutter to release correct? I believe there is an input for that on my camera.
 

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You are talking about a button that attaches to the camera with a cord that allows for the shutter to release correct? I believe there is an input for that on my camera.
Yep - that's a must with anything other than a very quick shutter speed.
 
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