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A few years back I had a watch posted for trade and I got an offer to swap for a Canon 40D with 17-85mm lens. I knew nothing about photography (and still don't) but I became intrigued by the option to own a really nice camera, so I made the trade. I've used it a little since then, but only recently have I decided to try again. I have been most impressed by macro photography, so yesterday I bought a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens. I barely even know what that means, but it gets great reviews! I've always used the standard auto functions on the camera and have never attempted to manually set all the variables. I would like to become more proficient, starting with watch pictures, so my questions are:

1. What settings do you typically use?
2. What settings would I use for a lume shot, in the dark?
3. Should I get a light box?
4. Is there a good book to read that could get me up to speed quickly?
 

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The 100mm macro lens you have is PERFECT for watch photography!!! One thing I always use is a steady tripod. If you're shooting without a flash, shutter speeds indoors are going to be SLOW. Even with flash a tripod makes tweaking the composition easier than trying to hold the camera. I always use external flash bounced off a white ceiling or wall for natural looking lighting. But bouncing the flash off the wrong part of the ceiling can cause glare on the watch crystal. Take a test shot if you get glare aim the flash at a different part of the ceiling or wall and try again. If you don't have external flash you can still usually get good shots. The camera's auto white balance setting should correct any strange color cast(most artificial lighting has a color cast). And I would use a small aperture(large f stop number, such as f/16) for as much depth of field as possible(depth of field is how much you're getting in sharp focus). In macro or close up photography, depth of field is minimal and you'll need all you can get usually. You can do this by putting the camera in "A" (aperture priority)mode. You select the f stop aperture and the camera will select the correct shutter speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The 100mm macro lens you have is PERFECT for watch photography!!! One thing I always use is a steady tripod. If you're shooting without a flash, shutter speeds indoors are going to be SLOW. Even with flash a tripod makes tweaking the composition easier than trying to hold the camera. I always use external flash bounced off a white ceiling or wall for natural looking lighting. But bouncing the flash off the wrong part of the ceiling can cause glare on the watch crystal. Take a test shot if you get glare aim the flash at a different part of the ceiling or wall and try again. If you don't have external flash you can still usually get good shots. The camera's auto white balance setting should correct any strange color cast(most artificial lighting has a color cast). And I would use a small aperture(large f stop number, such as f/16) for as much depth of field as possible(depth of field is how much you're getting in sharp focus). In macro or close up photography, depth of field is minimal and you'll need all you can get usually. You can do this by putting the camera in "A" (aperture priority)mode. You select the f stop aperture and the camera will select the correct shutter speed.
Thanks for the great tips! I will have to try A mode. I do have a tripod, but I also opted to spend a little more and got the 100mm macro with image stabilization for some added help.

I can't wait to try it out. I also wonder if an extension tube can lead to some really great closeups, but I'll stick with just the lens for now. I'm curious to see what an applied hour marker might look like really close up.

Before getting the macro lens I tired one of those 10x magnifier additions that screws onto the front of the lens. It worker out well and I got some great shots, but not the quality of a macro lens. The magnifier has the same thread size of the macro lens, 67mm, so I can try that as well.

Here's a couple of shots using my 17-85mm non macro lens with the magnifier.

5eef63d0-784b-4a96-868e-12bf7ac5b3a2_zps291e7ea8.jpg

IMG_0063_zps3ea1b1c7.jpg
 

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Nice shots. Do you already have the 100mm or are you waiting on it in the mail? I don't think you;ll need extension tubes with the 100mm-it achieves life size 1:1 reproduction ratio, which means life size images on the sensor. About image stabilization, sometimes shutter speeds are still going to be too slow and you'll still need a tripod. What magnifier did you use for these with the 17-85?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Nice shots. Do you already have the 100mm or are you waiting on it in the mail? I don't think you;ll need extension tubes with the 100mm-it achieves life size 1:1 reproduction ratio, which means life size images on the sensor. About image stabilization, sometimes shutter speeds are still going to be too slow and you'll still need a tripod. What magnifier did you use for these with the 17-85?
I did get the lens already but haven't had much chance to use it other than a quick test. I know black Friday is coming up but I was inpatient. The magnifier is from Opteka. A pretty cool add-on for just $25

10x_001.jpg
opteka-10x-hd-professional-macro-lens-58mm-lenses-easyresource-1505-09-easyresource@7.jpg
 

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Good shots and great choice. I am not a fan of macro lenses but they can definitely help to get some great shots as you have clearly seen ;)
A mode is a great advice, understanding the aperture triangle will go a long way, ad to that the rule of thirds (or the golden raton version) and you are good to go. And yes, a sturdy tripod is the best purchase you can make after a spare battery.
 

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It's an advanced method but I would suggest you try focus stacking (just Google for more info). In short, it's taking multiple photos with different focus and combining them together (using a software) for a greater depth of field, which is usually too short in macro photography. I'm still just learning this technique, here is my first attempt. BTW, the watch is Chinese Rodina, not Stowa.
seagull 6 copy.jpg
 

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These pic's taken with an inexpensive pocket Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS25 with Leica lens on super macro setting...first shot in a cheap light box, 2nd and 3rd natural lighting.

Last shot- same camera super macro off and on automatic setting.

All hand held, no tripod.
 

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I have recently purchased my first DSLR Camera and am wondering which Macro Lens to purchase for my Nikon D5600.
 
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I have recently purchased my first DSLR Camera and am wondering which Macro Lens to purchase for my Nikon D5600.
I use an AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 40mm f/2.8G on my D3300 for macro shots and am very happy with the results. If you're on a budget it's an excellent choice as it's less than 300 USD new, with good used examples to be found for far less. I paid only 125 USD for a like-new open box unit from B&H Photo. I bet you could find similar in Australia.

On the Nikon forum I belong to, I see almost universal praise for the macro capabilities of the AF-S Micro NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8 if you want to spend a bit more. (There's a 105mm macro for a hundred USD less, but it's only manual focus and the minimum focus distance is about a foot and a half, compared to one foot in the auto focus model.)

Best of luck with whatever you decide on. That D5600 is a very nice camera, and I'm sure you'll get some excellent shots no matter what lens you end up with.
 

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I use an AF-S DX Micro NIKKOR 40mm f/2.8G on my D3300 for macro shots and am very happy with the results. If you're on a budget it's an excellent choice as it's less than 300 USD new, with good used examples to be found for far less. I paid only 125 USD for a like-new open box unit from B&H Photo. I bet you could find similar in Australia.

On the Nikon forum I belong to, I see almost universal praise for the macro capabilities of the AF-S Micro NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8 if you want to spend a bit more. (There's a 105mm macro for a hundred USD less, but it's only manual focus and the minimum focus distance is about a foot and a half, compared to one foot in the auto focus model.)

Best of luck with whatever you decide on. That D5600 is a very nice camera, and I'm sure you'll get some excellent shots no matter what lens you end up with.
Thank you very much!

From what I have read, that 40mm f/2.8 is a really good Lens and represents good value for money.
 
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Thank you very much!

From what I have read, that 40mm f/2.8 is a really good Lens and represents good value for money.
My kit is the Nikon D3300 with the 40mm 2.8 Macro which is a great lens especially considering the price.

I took these pics with that setup









I'm sure that I've posted these pics in one of these forums.

The downside with the 40mm is you have to get very close to the object your photograph so if you can afford the 105mm I would go with that.
 

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$10 macro lens for handphones

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Great pic!

Forgive my ignorance, but I have a genuine question about this. I don't own a camera with a phone, so this is kinda foreign territory for me. Can you adjust any settings on a phone camera, like shutter speed, aperture, ISO, etc? Looking at your pic there, if that were me I'd want to try playing around with a longer shutter speed to get a bit more depth of field, or something like that. Is that possible with your setup?

Thanks!
 

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Great pic!

Forgive my ignorance, but I have a genuine question about this. I don't own a camera with a phone, so this is kinda foreign territory for me. Can you adjust any settings on a phone camera, like shutter speed, aperture, ISO, etc? Looking at your pic there, if that were me I'd want to try playing around with a longer shutter speed to get a bit more depth of field, or something like that. Is that possible with your setup?

Thanks!
Thanks.

Without searching for apps, the stock software for Note 8 allows you to select Pro settings and play around with parameters as you've mentioned. But for this pic, it was taken with an iPhone without any such manipulation.

Attached is a pic taken with Note 8 at 1s exposure to capture the 10 beats per second of the second hand over the GMT hand.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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