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MANUAL vs AUTO.
if a watch will get less wrist time, just weekends and some casual evenings. lets say in total twice a week or so. is it better (for the watch) to get a manual or an automatic. No winder and won't be winding it regularly. Would wind only before wearing it. So basically it might sit 'asleep' for 3-4 days a week. Manual vs auto in such a situation?
 

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i think auto would be more convenient in this case...
 

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Well, handwind seems the appropriate choice, because autos are going to run down. But good hand-winds are hard to find, in general, or should I say that there are just more autos out there. So go for a hand-wind, or an auto that can also handwind--like anything with an ETA 2824, or anything with most Sea-Gull movements. Some of the newer Orients and Seikos also handwind.
 
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Well, handwind seems the appropriate choice, because autos are going to run down. But good hand-winds are hard to find, in general, or should I say that there are just more autos out there. So go for a hand-wind, or an auto that can also handwind--like anything with an ETA 2824, or anything with most Sea-Gull movements. Some of the newer Orients and Seikos also handwind.
+1. Hand-wind. No date.
 

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Manual or Automatic... doesn't make any difference in my mind, as long as it (if you get an automatic) can be hand wound so you can give it a good charge after it has run down each time.

In my opinion (if it's for occasional use), the biggest hassle will be re-setting the complications each time. At most, get something with date only, but ideally a 'no-complication' watch would be best so you can simply wind it, set the time, and be on your way. Something like an Omega Speedmaster Professional would be perfect.
 

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If you're not going to be winding it in the interim even if it's a manual, then it doesn't matter. Complications are the real issue. Make sure it's no-date or has quick-set date.
 

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Agreed, it doesn't matter much since either way you have to set the time. Automatic might be better because then you just need to give it a shake to get it started up again.

I ordered an MK II Nassau for a very similar wear pattern as you've described, and I think a no-date automatic like that is the way to go.
 

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If you're not using a winder it doesn't really matter. I'd keep the complications at a minimum if you aren't wearing it daily or using a winder.

I have a Longines Master Collection Moonphase Chronograph and it's a real bear to set all of them (6 complications in total) when I decide to wear it for the day.
 

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The power reserve matters more than the watch being auto or manual. Both will be dead when you pick it up to wear if power reserve is not long enough.
 

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Handwind is much better, as you can keep it running even if you don't wear it. I hate when my automatics run down because I didn't wear them long enough (i.e. to avoid damage doing various works). It's either handwind or quartz. Or you can buy a winder if necessary, but winders are often a solution worse than the problem (either fragile, noisy or costly).
 

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As stated, as far as the watch goes, if it is a handwind-able automatic, it doesn't matter. The bear is the complication count, but for a three hander, date or no date, doesn't matter.
 

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Automatic might be better because then you just need to give it a shake to get it started up again.
I'm learning more and more things about watches and watch movements and this becoming a pet peeve of mine. I wish people would stop suggesting that they SHAKE their mechanical watches. It's bad for the movement.

My AD said to me if he ever catches me wearing one of my high end watches on a golf course he's going to drive his ball at me.

Besides, even for you that might doubt that shaking a watch might hurt can I ask what's wrong with a gentle wind instead, and playing safe as a consequence?
 

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PS - Manual.

You don't need the automatic function so you can ditch the rotor and see the full movement, unimpeded, through a nice exhibition caseback.
 

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I'm learning more and more things about watches and watch movements and this becoming a pet peeve of mine. I wish people would stop suggesting that they SHAKE their mechanical watches. It's bad for the movement.

My AD said to me if he ever catches me wearing one of my high end watches on a golf course he's going to drive his ball at me.
Can you elaborate on why you believe it's bad for the movement?

Also, you may want to get a new AD--in what universe are watches not meant to be worn on a golf course?? Omega has a version of your AT specifically marketed at golfers!!! Some people are way too sensitive about what are after all well-made machines.
 

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I'm also curious how shaking would be bad for an auto watch, these are meant to be worn on the wrist and not sit in a case right?
 

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I'm also curious how shaking would be bad for an auto watch, these are meant to be worn on the wrist and not sit in a case right?
It's a question of degrees. Shaking is the wrong term to use.
Use a brandy-swirl motion to start your auto.
Shaking the crap out of it is not advisable and does not replicate normal wear on the wrist.
 

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Re: shaking. Anyone who has ever worn an auto while jogging or walking very briskly will have shaken (but not stirred) his watch vigorously thousands of times. This suggests shaking while not perhaps optimal for rate performance can't be that bad.
 
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