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I was recently advised by a watch maker where I purchased my Breitling that I should not be placing my watch on a winder overnight. His advice was that it should only be placed on a winder when it will not be worn for more then 1 day. Reason being is that artificially spinning the watch on the same axis will cause the the bushings to wear out quicker, and the main shaft of the watch would then rub against the back of the casing. (Not sure if I completely got that right...) The watchmaker believes that watch owners who use the winder more often require more frequent service, and will require replacement of their bushings. He stated that if I use the winder I will need a service and eventual bushing replacement after 5 years. But if I use the winder minimally I won't notice a time shortage, and won't require a service for nearly 10 years.

To follow this advice I have been leaving my watch in the winder overnight, but not turning it on. I found a few ocassions (generally on Saturday when I sleep late) that the watch stopped working overnight. So now I wind the watch after I take it off before setting it down for the evening.

My question for your folks is 2-fold. First, do you agree with this assesment, and when do you guys set your watch on a winder? Second, when you wind it manually do you spin it a certian number of times, or do you put your ear to the watch and listen for the clicking of the clutch to engage?

By the way, I have a Montbrillant Olympus.....which I can't stop staring at :)

Thanks for the help..
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The number of times that you are required to wind your watch can be found in your watch manual. And yes I'm against watch winders(not only over night).
 

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Here are a few of my thoughts on this topic about to wind/winder/or autowind:

I have a Breitling Navitimer Olympus, Navitimer Cosmonaute, BfB 6.75 and a Professional B-1. I work in Indonesia for eight weeks and am home in Katy, Texas for three. At least two of my mechanicals stay on a watch-winer while I am gone. This winder is a "cheap" electric model (2-watches) that only has a toggle switch in the back - clockwise/off/counter clockwise (can't even see a brand name on it). I have it plugged into a timer like some people use to turn lights on/off while on vacation. My timer is set to turn on for about 30 minutes in am and about 30 minutes in pm. Some times, when I am away, my Wife hits the toggle so as to change wind direction. When I recently returned home both my Olympus and Cosmonaute were still running with correct dates and less than a minute off correct time. I have also returned home to find the winder unplugged with watches stopped for sometime, but I have no problem resetting and getting them re-ticking again. I would not have a problem/concern with leaving any of my watches either on or off of my winder. I also, based on my limited experience, don't see the need for hi-end watch winders, although they are nice. I will take the money that I save on winders and get another Breitling - Navitimer Datora w/Havana dial; Navitimer World w/white dial; plus others. I have read on forums that some "cheap" winders are noisey - mine isn't. As far as over-winding (from what I have read & heard, you can't do that on a "modern-day" mechanical watch. Also I don't think there is much of a problem with letting an automatic watch sit. Some WIS's say that this causes a problem due to the lubricants not being properly distributed. I don't think so. Go into a watch shop. Many of the watches that you see, just sit in the case, they do not wind them, nor do they get worn till sold. If you come across a watch that has not been worn for many years and even those that have, it might be service time, i.e. some NOS and vintage watches. I also do not have a problem with manually winding an automatic watch that has stopped. When I do wind I listen and "feel" and when I hear the "click" or feel the resistance of the main-spring reacing its limit - I stop. Most are designed that way. I think that if it were a major problem there would be warnings in the instruction book "CAUTION Do Not Wind This Watch". My instruction books do say to wind to kick-start the watch.
I am of the belief that mechanical watches whether automatic or manual winding are meant to be used. So, I will continue to use my watch-winder and when necessary I will wind them by hand.
When it is time for servicing, according to the manufacturer's recommendations - I will take them to my AD or send them to Breitling. I will not complain about the cost because if that is what it takes, that is what it takes. I I wind or my winder winds and I wear my watch out I will send it to Brietling and get it fixed.

Breitling Navitimer Olympus are :-! ; here is a pic of mine
 
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