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Hello all,
can you help me getting some info about this watch? Thank you.

Rgs,
André
Well, it's a Zenith chronograph! ;-)

Seriously, it is very difficult to give much information on one photograph, and a kind of blurry one at that. For example, I really cannot tell what color the case is. The dial is kind of difficult to see in case it is a redial. We don't know what the movement is so we can't tell whether it is the correct movement or even guess at the age. As well, the movement will have a serial number that will allow you to get Zenith to give you the year it was made and how many may have been made.

So I am not giving you a hard time, just letting you know we really could use more information if we are to answer your question.

Regards,

Dan
 

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If you have access to Gisbert Brunner's/Christian Pfeiffer-Belli's co-authored, big, fat, trilingual book on wristwatches ("Wristwatches/Armbanduhren/Montre-bracelets"), you will find the steel version of that watch on page 409 (#5 on that page). It is marked: "Steel chronograph 1963, 30-minute and 12-hour counters, tachymeter scale, Cal. 146HP 13''' manually wound movement, 17j". If you don't have access to the book, you should probably get it.....!

Even without the book, I can say that a vintage Zenith chronograph without date feature is usually a Cal. 143 or similar if pre-1960 (movement is really an Excelsior Park Cal. Expark 4 or something similar from that company), or a Cal. 146 or 156 if from the sixties or later (old stocks being used up after the introduction of the El Primero in 1969). The Cals. 146/156 (the difference between the two being movement size) were made by Martel who originally supplied these to Universal Genève (UG calibres 285 and 749). After Martel were bought up by Zenith around 1960, Zenith acquired these movements, thus having in-house chronographs. The Martel section were the geniuses who in the end designed the El Primero.

Other than Excelsior Park movements, Zenith also used Valjoux and Angelus chronograph movements, at least on occasion. Plus maybe others (anyone with knowledge here, please chip in).

Hope this helps.

Hartmut Richter
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for your help, i´m getting that book for sure. When i open the watch i´ll take more pictures if you want!

Rgs from Portugal,

André
 

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Vintage watches are virtually never water resistant (unless they've got screw down crowns). Come to think of it, neither are modern watches - the "30m/3atm water resist" is frequently not worth a damn!!

Hartmut Richter
 

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Other than Excelsior Park movements, Zenith also used Valjoux and Angelus chronograph movements, at least on occasion. Plus maybe others (anyone with knowledge here, please chip in).

Hope this helps.

Hartmut Richter
Anyone can confirm that Zenith also used Venus 188 in their chronographs?
 

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Can I ask for closer info on the cal. 143? Production data, or movement descriptions? Could only find data on 146/156 series (not too much though)


Beautiful watch indeed, give us better pictures if possible, to enjoy the looks |>


If you have access to Gisbert Brunner's/Christian Pfeiffer-Belli's co-authored, big, fat, trilingual book on wristwatches ("Wristwatches/Armbanduhren/Montre-bracelets"), you will find the steel version of that watch on page 409 (#5 on that page). It is marked: "Steel chronograph 1963, 30-minute and 12-hour counters, tachymeter scale, Cal. 146HP 13''' manually wound movement, 17j". If you don't have access to the book, you should probably get it.....!

Even without the book, I can say that a vintage Zenith chronograph without date feature is usually a Cal. 143 or similar if pre-1960 (movement is really an Excelsior Park Cal. Expark 4 or something similar from that company), or a Cal. 146 or 156 if from the sixties or later (old stocks being used up after the introduction of the El Primero in 1969). The Cals. 146/156 (the difference between the two being movement size) were made by Martel who originally supplied these to Universal Genève (UG calibres 285 and 749). After Martel were bought up by Zenith around 1960, Zenith acquired these movements, thus having in-house chronographs. The Martel section were the geniuses who in the end designed the El Primero.

Other than Excelsior Park movements, Zenith also used Valjoux and Angelus chronograph movements, at least on occasion. Plus maybe others (anyone with knowledge here, please chip in).

Hope this helps.

Hartmut Richter
 
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