WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I know every METAS watch performs differently dependent on each individual's activity and his/her watch's "normalized" timing rate within 0 to +5 per day tolerance.

My question is: Is it normal for a METAS watch to slow to -1 to -1.5 second (out of METAS specs of 0 to +5) over night, while worn on the wrist during sleep? I'm thinking it's warm under my blanket and that would cause my watch to slow down. Is that normal?

Should I have my watch regulated because it's out of METAS specs? It's a brand new watch I just purchased yesterday. Picture of my watch and the results of METAS of my watch shown below...

Kind regards
Louis
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,687 Posts
I would monitor it for a while and see how it performs. Strangely, both my metas watches lose time. I leave mine off at night dial down and the loss is minimal. Technically out of their spec but its so small there’s a chance it would be returned to me with a full bill of health after being at the SC for a few weeks. I would rather it lose 3 seconds a week than gain 4 a day (meta spec). Nice watch by the way!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,103 Posts
I know every METAS watch performs differently dependent on each individual's activity and his/her watch's "normalized" timing rate within 0 to +5 per day tolerance.

My question is: Is it normal for a METAS watch to slow to -1 to -1.5 second (out of METAS specs of 0 to +5) over night, while worn on the wrist during sleep? I'm thinking it's warm under my blanket and that would cause my watch to slow down. Is that normal?

Should I have my watch regulated because it's out of METAS specs? It's a brand new watch I just purchased yesterday. Picture of my watch and the results of METAS of my watch shown below...

Kind regards
Louis
Few things...your watch has a Cal. 8806 inside. As you can see on your own METAS results, the tolerance for average daily rate is from 0 to +6, not 0 to +5 as you stated. Different movements have different tolerances, so not all METAS watches have the 0 to +5 tolerance. Some are 0 to 6, and the smaller ladies movements are 0 to 7.

Seconds, the 0 to +6 tolerance is a tolerance for average rate. This means that the watch is timed over 6 positions, and there is an average of those 6 positions. If the average of those positions can be zero, then it's clear that some of those readings can be less than zero - running slow. In your watch, that average is shown as +1.3 seconds per day, and to the right of that it shows the acceptable range for average rate, which is again 0 to 6.

The number highlighted in red is for the positional variation. What this number represents is the difference between the fastest and smallest rate across those 6 timing tests. That number is 4.9, so let's just call it 5 seconds. So that means the range of timing you will get in the 6 different positions will vary up to 5 seconds.

Now you average is 1.3, so if the average of those readings is that close to zero, and the range of readings is 5 seconds, you can be sure that some of the positions run fast, and some run slow. If your wearing habits happen to favour a position that runs slow, your watch may run slow in real life.

This is not a defect, and it is not out of spec.

Most likely if you took this to Omega to have it regulated, they wouldn't do it under warranty, because it's in spec. They may do it as a courtesy to you, but the fact is the watch is running fine. Most people simply don't understand how the timing specifications on these watches actually work, and that when a range is given for the average rate, it is not a guarantee that the watch will run within that range at all times.

So my advice would be for you to do some tests to find out what positions run fast and what positions run slow. Use a known time source to set the watch, wind it fully, store it in a given position (dial up for example) for 24 hours, and the note the change in time. Repeat this for all 6 positions, and you will find the position that you can store it in overnight that will make up for time losses during the day.

Cheers, Al
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,356 Posts
Few things...your watch has a Cal. 8806 inside. As you can see on your own METAS results, the tolerance for average daily rate is from 0 to +6, not 0 to +5 as you stated. Different movements have different tolerances, so not all METAS watches have the 0 to +5 tolerance. Some are 0 to 6, and the smaller ladies movements are 0 to 7.

Seconds, the 0 to +6 tolerance is a tolerance for average rate. This means that the watch is timed over 6 positions, and there is an average of those 6 positions. If the average of those positions can be zero, then it's clear that some of those readings can be less than zero - running slow. In your watch, that average is shown as +1.3 seconds per day, and to the right of that it shows the acceptable range for average rate, which is again 0 to 6.

The number highlighted in red is for the positional variation. What this number represents is the difference between the fastest and smallest rate across those 6 timing tests. That number is 4.9, so let's just call it 5 seconds. So that means the range of timing you will get in the 6 different positions will vary up to 5 seconds.

Now you average is 1.3, so if the average of those readings is that close to zero, and the range of readings is 5 seconds, you can be sure that some of the positions run fast, and some run slow. If your wearing habits happen to favour a position that runs slow, your watch may run slow in real life.

This is not a defect, and it is not out of spec.

Most likely if you took this to Omega to have it regulated, they wouldn't do it under warranty, because it's in spec. They may do it as a courtesy to you, but the fact is the watch is running fine. Most people simply don't understand how the timing specifications on these watches actually work, and that when a range is given for the average rate, it is not a guarantee that the watch will run within that range at all times.

So my advice would be for you to do some tests to find out what positions run fast and what positions run slow. Use a known time source to set the watch, wind it fully, store it in a given position (dial up for example) for 24 hours, and the note the change in time. Repeat this for all 6 positions, and you will find the position that you can store it in overnight that will make up for time losses during the day.

Cheers, Al
Thanks as always, Al @Archer ! Your responses to these inquiries are always concise and easy to understand. Thank you for taking the time, and for your patience.

These movement performance/accuracy questions come up all the time. Maybe you could draft a post explaining accuracy as it pertains to COSC and METAS certifications and one of the mods can make it a sticky. That way the information is easy to access for those looking and for us to steer people to. Just an idea to save you repeating yourself every week. Just an idea.🤷‍♂️

I've learn a lot from your posts over the years. Thanks again and be well!

René
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Few things...your watch has a Cal. 8806 inside. As you can see on your own METAS results, the tolerance for average daily rate is from 0 to +6, not 0 to +5 as you stated. Different movements have different tolerances, so not all METAS watches have the 0 to +5 tolerance. Some are 0 to 6, and the smaller ladies movements are 0 to 7.

Seconds, the 0 to +6 tolerance is a tolerance for average rate. This means that the watch is timed over 6 positions, and there is an average of those 6 positions. If the average of those positions can be zero, then it's clear that some of those readings can be less than zero - running slow. In your watch, that average is shown as +1.3 seconds per day, and to the right of that it shows the acceptable range for average rate, which is again 0 to 6.

The number highlighted in red is for the positional variation. What this number represents is the difference between the fastest and smallest rate across those 6 timing tests. That number is 4.9, so let's just call it 5 seconds. So that means the range of timing you will get in the 6 different positions will vary up to 5 seconds.

Now you average is 1.3, so if the average of those readings is that close to zero, and the range of readings is 5 seconds, you can be sure that some of the positions run fast, and some run slow. If your wearing habits happen to favour a position that runs slow, your watch may run slow in real life.

This is not a defect, and it is not out of spec.

Most likely if you took this to Omega to have it regulated, they wouldn't do it under warranty, because it's in spec. They may do it as a courtesy to you, but the fact is the watch is running fine. Most people simply don't understand how the timing specifications on these watches actually work, and that when a range is given for the average rate, it is not a guarantee that the watch will run within that range at all times.

So my advice would be for you to do some tests to find out what positions run fast and what positions run slow. Use a known time source to set the watch, wind it fully, store it in a given position (dial up for example) for 24 hours, and the note the change in time. Repeat this for all 6 positions, and you will find the position that you can store it in overnight that will make up for time losses during the day.

Cheers, Al

I totally agree with Titan II (Rene). The information you posted in regards to my inquiry is priceless and most helpful, especially those new to METAS and the information they get when they buy a new Omega with METAS certification. Thank you kindly for your post. Yes, I do hope the moderators can make a sticky of your information on how to read METAS results.

Sincerely
Louis
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top