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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all.

Time to think about my wife´s gift....getting late.
She is thinking about the Pasha and the new Rolex DateJust 26mm.

Yes, one is quarts and one is not.
But, how about the steel quality? Does Rolex use a higher steel quality than Cartier?
What I, she, is thinking of is harder, keeping the watch looking "better" after wear and tear.
NOw she had a Bvlgari watch, but the steel is very soft, the watch is only 2 year old, but had "deep" bumps on the bezel. Not so good. I think that Bvlgari in that watch was using a soft steel.
Hope, think, that Rolex and Cartier a better. I have a feeling that Rolex is the hardest......
 

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The sad news first. There is no practical difference in hardness between the 316L steel that is used in almost all wrist watches and that is already surgical steel and the 904L steel that Rolex uses. Gold is even softer. 904L has higher resistance to salt water and sulfuric acid. So if you plan to drown your wife in either, the Rolex will survive that better than the Cartier. But I recommend just taking the watch off beforehand. ;) Just kidding, of course.

The second sad news, if you are talking about dents and not scratches, you lost anyway. Even the case hardened steel models by Damasko and Sinn (look them up) or the Duratect (also case hardened not just a coating) by Citizen are not immune to dents. If you bang the watch on a door jam or kitchen counter or you drop it on asphalt, it will get dings and dents. In principle, the heavier the watch is, the more impact there will be. So getting a "fat" watch won't help. Quite the opposite is true. Getting a watch that is flat and sits close to the wrist, not worn loosely, will help avoid wear.

The third sad news Rolex and Cartier will not be better than Bulgari in this regard. Given that many Rolex models use a gold bezel and gold is even softer than steel, this won't help, either.

What will help, in addition to a well fitting watch, is a watch with a SMALL bezel that's slanted. These are more likely not to get a full frontal impact. Rolex has that. Cartier and Bulgari are mostly fully flat.

So basically nothing except a rubber coat prevents dings and dents. The impact is simply too big. If you want to prevent scratches and swirl marks that come with everyday wear, yes, that is possible. You can choose a Sinn, Damasko, Citizen Duratect, Seiko Brightz, ceramic or tungsten watch. All of these will retain their sparkle much longer. If you want a rubber coated watch there are not many choices. The rubber coating on the IWC Galapagos is reported to be of less than optimal quality and it's certainly not in the target group of watches for your wife if you were thinking of a small Rolex or Cartier watch. :) You probably aren't into Casio G-Shocks, either. Although they wear exceptionally well and the rubber coat can be exchanged quickly and cheaply if ever it does get worn. Genius.

Now the good news. If you do want a sturdy everyday watch for your wife, try a small Rolex or a small Omega Aquaterra. Both feature excellent movements and cases. The Omega's crystal is less exposed than that of the Rolex. This means less chance chipping the crystal. Both are WR and have screwdown crowns. There is also a more feminine model by Omega that just came out. I forgot the name. Ladymaster or something? Omega offers their watches with quartz movements. A favorite among women and much cheaper. So I'd choose a quartz Omega AT. The Omega AT also has brushed sides. These are less prone to swirls and easier to redo yourself. The mirror polish on the sides of a Rolex is rather fragile and can only be restored to its full glory by a pro. This will be costly and last about a month when the watch is used everyday. So if you want one of the hardiest watches around for women, you get an Omega AT with quartz movement and steel band. The Rolex DJ would only be my second choice.

My grandma was wearing her steel/gold small Rolex DJ for thirty years basically every single day, doing everything with it. She took it off only for sleep and showers. Now my mother wears it. It has seen regular service every 7-8 years or so. The watch looks surprisingly good.

More good news. Unless the dings and dents are really deep, the factory service is often EXCELLENT at making the watch look like new. When even the best polisseur cannot recover it anymore, there is always the option of getting a new case.
 

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Wrong forum, moving it to Public.
 

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Thanks for a good, very good, reply and good information.
Di niente, Dino! ;)

One more thing I wanted to say, when comparing the Rolex DJ and the Omega AT, the Rolex has a loupe for the date. If one's eyes aren't super fit anymore, that can be helpful. But the Omega scores with an anti-reflective coating that makes the entire dial easier to see. Best to try it out.

The little Cartier tanks can be worn everyday but I find them a tad to fragile, especially the crown with cabochon. Also not a screwdown crown. And on the quartz watches the Cartier crowns are notoriously fragile. I have one of those and one day I just held the entire crown in my hands. It just broke off when setting the watch. Happened during the warranty period, IIRC, but still disappointing. It hasn't happened since, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good tip. Thanks. The Rolex DJ is a nice watch. But, as sad, the loupe is not the best looking thing...Part from that, a nice watch. Thanks for the information regarding the Tank crowns, did not know that.
 

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Good tip. Thanks. The Rolex DJ is a nice watch. But, as sad, the loupe is not the best looking thing...Part from that, a nice watch. Thanks for the information regarding the Tank crowns, did not know that.
I agree, the loupe is not the best looking thing. But it's practical and it's a typical Rolex recognition feature. The good news is that you can easily take it off. It's glued to the sapphire glass. Heat the loupe with a lighter or candle flame. Then just slide off the loupe from the glass. Clean off any glue traces. You can have a jeweler do that or look up a tutorial on the web. Or buy the AT by Omega and avoid the problem entirely. After all, the AT pretty much looks like a DJ without the loupe and with nicer lugs. ;)
 
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