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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious

I know the original Airman watches had protection against magnetic fields, but do the modern Airman models?

No info on the Glycine site and looking at the display backs of the modern watches, I don't see any obvious anti-magnetic casings.

Anyone know?
 

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I can't recall the Airman 1 as having any special anti-magnetic features, the dial is brass and there is no additional protection covering the movement. I am sure the AS movements had a Glucydur balance and a Nivarox hairspring both antimagnetic alloys still used in the modern ETA movements.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I can't recall the Airman 1 as having any special anti-magnetic features, the dial is brass and there is no additional protection covering the movement. I am sure the AS movements had a Glucydur balance and a Nivarox hairspring both antimagnetic alloys still used in the modern ETA movements.
Thanks John

That's my question answered!

I noticed that the first Airman Special has 'Antimagnetic' on the dial. I suppose that's due to the above?
 

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Thanks John

That's my question answered!

I noticed that the first Airman Special has 'Antimagnetic' on the dial. I suppose that's due to the above?
Yes that's right, in the early 60's it was still novel enough to warrant putting on the dial. I suppose in the context of its time it did have anti-magnetic protection something we take for granted now!
 

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Errr, not in my case (unless mine is a fake).

My Glycine Airman 46 has been running fast around 2 minutes a day for ages. I have sent it back to London to be serviced under the guarantee.



After the 3rd time, I got a letter from the watch service centre saying that it had to be de-magnetised.



However I found again, that it is running fast. I held a compass over the dial and sure enough it moves 15 degrees or so.

It looks like the monitors and speakers on my office desk (where I would keep my watch at night) is causing the problem.

I am thinking of buying a de-magnetiser to run my watch through periodically.
 

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The anti-magnetic properties do not make the watch magnet proof but makes it less susceptible to magnetic fields. So it is possible to magnetise a watch. In the early 1960's it was still quite novel so worth putting on the dial. Modern Swiss watches are good to 4800 A/m.

There are some watches on the market that have additional protection such as the IWC Ingenieur and Rolex Milgauss (80,000 A/m) and the Royal Navy (Orfina) Military Mkii (100,000 A/m). These have extra protection in the form of a soft iron Faraday cage enclosing the movement and in the case of they Orfina they have an iron dial as part of the Faraday cage.

I have had several watches magnetised over the years, one of which was a Glycine Airman 2000 and I have no idea how it happened! In your case speaker magnets are probably the cause!
 
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