WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Okay...as you can see from my Keep list below, I have two moderately decent automatic watches. The Seiko is not a good timekeeper, losing about 30-odd seconds a day, and I don't want to be constantly unscrewing the crown to adjust it. But it will do as a dive and weekend sports watch. My Glycine loses 15 seconds a day...this is acceptable as I can easily adjust it once a week to maintain within-a-minute accuracy. And of course, both watches run within their published specs, so I can't really complain about the matter,

However I have taken both these watches to local 'watchmakers' who basically didn't want the job of adjusting them and did their best to convince me that if I wanted better accuracy, I should be looking at quartz watches.

I didn't bother arguing with them, or explaining I knew at least a tiny bit about the potential accuracy of those watches' movements...people here regularly talk about adjusting their own Seiko divers to within a few seconds +or- per day, and lots of people talk about the great accuracy of their standard 2824-2 watches, , but now I'm starting to wonder if I'm asking for something unreasonable.

So what do you think fellow WIS'ers? Would you spend the bucks to have a good quality watch brought up to its potential, or would you simply accept the fact that a non-COSC certified watch doesn't need to run any closer to 'correct time' than it already does, even if you have to adjust it once a week [or oftener]?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
5,111 Posts
I stopped worrying about extreme accuracy a long time ago. I normally don't wear a watch for more than 10 or 12 hours and then it's usually several days before it gets back on my wrist. I let 'em run down and reset them at the next use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,407 Posts
I'm not in the least an "anti-quartz" guy, they're great.
That doesn't stop me from wanting excellent accuracy from automatics.
I can tell you feel likewise.
I say get em regulated if you can find a competent watchmaker then come back in and brag about +2 secs a day ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
To be honest, your local watchmakers are right. If you're too concerned with accuracy, then maybe you should consider buying quartz watches instead.

There's a tradeoff with owning a mechanical watch. No automatic watch, no matter how expensive will be as accurate as a quartz watch. That said, I enjoy wearing my automatics and I'm okay if they run a little fast. Personally, I'd rather have a watch that gained a few seconds per day than loose them.

Now, if I were really fond of a particular automatic and it lost more than 30 seconds a day, then yes, I would consider getting it regulated by a watchmaker especially if it was a watch I wanted to wear constantly. It all depends on what the watch means to you.

Most of us here own more than one watch and generally rotate the watches we wear on a daily basis so the accuracy of one particular watch becomes less of a big deal, but in the end it's up to you. If you're not happy with your watch's performance then by all means take it to a watchmaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,515 Posts
Okay...as you can see from my Keep list below, I have two moderately decent automatic watches. The Seiko is not a good timekeeper, losing about 30-odd seconds a day, and I don't want to be constantly unscrewing the crown to adjust it. But it will do as a dive and weekend sports watch. My Glycine loses 15 seconds a day...this is acceptable as I can easily adjust it once a week to maintain within-a-minute accuracy. And of course, both watches run within their published specs, so I can't really complain about the matter,

However I have taken both these watches to local 'watchmakers' who basically didn't want the job of adjusting them and did their best to convince me that if I wanted better accuracy, I should be looking at quartz watches.

I didn't bother arguing with them, or explaining I knew at least a tiny bit about the potential accuracy of those watches' movements...people here regularly talk about adjusting their own Seiko divers to within a few seconds +or- per day, and lots of people talk about the great accuracy of their standard 2824-2 watches, , but now I'm starting to wonder if I'm asking for something unreasonable.

So what do you think fellow WIS'ers? Would you spend the bucks to have a good quality watch brought up to its potential, or would you simply accept the fact that a non-COSC certified watch doesn't need to run any closer to 'correct time' than it already does, even if you have to adjust it once a week [or oftener]?
After collecting for 0ver 40 years and having more watches than I can even remember, I finally decided to invest in a timing machine. They have come down in cost the last several years and are worth looking into. A good case opener and a timing machine will get you in the position you can have all your mechanical watches running within sec a day. I know many will say I would never invest 500 in a timing machine but I looked at it this way. That is the price of one decent watch andyou can use it for years. If you like a certain watch it is worth having it run spot on. Give it some thought and look into the machine I have posted. Price is great and it is easy to learn to use it. Hope you find this useful.
Gary




I have not found any of my watches that I can not bring within COSC, regardless of movement brand. ETA does seem to be slightly easier to bring into speck but the citizen movement is another easy to time movement "Miyota that is".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
780 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Gentlemen: The point is not pure accuracy. The point is to get the maximum accuracy out of the watches I already own [and may come to own] and like to wear.

If I wanted pure accuracy I'd get one of those watches set by radio signal. As it is, I have a $35 plastic-cased Timex digital that gains about 15 seconds per year. Those are not the watches I want to wear.

Mr. OWS1, you are an inspiration to me [and here I thought I was crazy]. Since I don't plan to own great numbers of watches, I'm not really sure this is the answer for me, but I will certainly give the idea some thought. Thanks for the suggestion.
 

·
Affordables Moderator
Joined
·
17,574 Posts
I only notice if a particular watch is out 20-30 seconds or more per day, otherwise I ignore it but I have too many watches :-d

As I have asked for good watch tools for Christmas that timing setup is looking nicer and nicer Gary :-!

Cheers,
Griff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,407 Posts
I only notice if a particular watch is out 20-30 seconds or more per day, otherwise I ignore it but I have too many watches :-d

As I have asked for good watch tools for Christmas that timing setup is looking nicer and nicer Gary :-!

Cheers,
Griff
A very funny mental image of Griff trying to synch and set umpteen watches just flashed ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Well, for average people, I don't think generally speaking there is any need at all to know the exact time over being within 5 minutes either way.

I mean, the time society runs on isn't the atomic clock, it's whichever one is closest and that gets set off of another one when it's off etc. etc.

Unless it's running a some rediculous rate of inaccuracy, I just can't see the concern over it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Well, for average people, I don't think generally speaking there is any need at all to know the exact time over being within 5 minutes either way.

I mean, the time society runs on isn't the atomic clock, it's whichever one is closest and that gets set off of another one when it's off etc. etc.
One of my profs in undergrad was really strict. At the start of the semester he had us set our watches to match his.

If you were 1 second late to class he wouldnt let you in the room.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,515 Posts
I only notice if a particular watch is out 20-30 seconds or more per day, otherwise I ignore it but I have too many watches :-d

As I have asked for good watch tools for Christmas that timing setup is looking nicer and nicer Gary :-!

Cheers,
Griff
Griff:
Thanks and I know this is not for every one, but for some of us who love our hobby and have the time it is just a hoot to be in a position to say my watch is within COSA and "I regulated it myself:-!.
I will say a little prayer for you that you get your wishes for Christmas. I have to admit I always enjoy my visits with you all.
Now if the politicians got along as well as us WIS it would be a better world|>
Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
One of my profs in undergrad was really strict. At the start of the semester he had us set our watches to match his.

If you were 1 second late to class he wouldnt let you in the room.
Most people don't even wear watches on a daily basis anymore, so such synchronizing might be tough lol. I've heard these kinds of tales, personally, I never ran into a single professor like that my entire university career.

But then what happens when you have an ultra accurate chronometer certified watch and this professor has an Invicta which gains 45 seconds per day? See the thing is that for practical purposes, your watch is only as accurate as the most inaccurate one you're dealing with. I remember someone saying that about the military, how if you were on exericse or operations you would want to have something super accurate. But I remember in the army before leaving for an attack or mission or something everyone would always just synchronize watches with the platoon commander, and who knows what kind he had? Maybe accurate, maybe not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,166 Posts
Gentlemen: The point is not pure accuracy. The point is to get the maximum accuracy out of the watches I already own [and may come to own] and like to wear.
Regulating a watch to as good an accuracy as it is capable is like tuning up a car. You will never get a Chevrolet to compete in F1, but you can get it to run smoothly with no missing and stalling and studdering. My 1914 Waltham will never keep as good a time as my Longines VHP... but it runs as well as it can. That's all I expect of my watches. And that's what I demand.

I too have thought of buying a timing machine... :) But my problem is I want to regulate my ETA quartz watches too... The Watchis that will do that cost a lot more than $500 :-|

(You can regulate the ETA thermocompensated watches with only a wire and maybe a battery... there is a big discussion on this in the HEQ stickies...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
Get your watches regulated. They can only get better. If you are constantly seeing +30s/day (on average) you should be able to regulate it close to zero (on average). You don't need a $2000 to be able to regulate it. Cheap Seiko 7s26's have been regulated from +30/day to a few seconds a day. So it is worth every penny.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top