WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I hunt/collect pocket watches of many types. Some I collect, some I re-sell. This summer I found this 1940ish Hamilton 12s 21jewel Hamilton. The open case was 14k and although I like to think that most watches I sell will not get scrapped for the metal content, I always realize that possibility in the back of my mind.

Well, this one was sold over the summer and just recently I was browsing Hamilton on eBay when a seller name caught my eye. Sure enough, his name was in my feedback attached to the Hamilton I sold. I was currently looking at a wristwatch with a tricked out 921 movement. It was all skeletonized, and vintage which caught my eye. I liked the watch first. Secondly, I couldn't help but compare the serial number on the movement to the one I sold him. A match! I really don't like the idea of scrapping cases, but I'm sure that's what happened in this case.

However, the end result was quite nice... and it was the movement I found... and I liked how it looked. The seller turned out to be a good watchmaker. And he did an excellent job. I wear the watch daily. It just occurred to me you all might find the story and pix interesting. Any similar experiences?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I have not come across anything that looked that good. But I have to say that, while it is a shame about the case, I do like the looks of "new" watch. Very cool.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
You know...I can see one big problem with that watch. The twelve is below the crown. If the crown's on the right, then that's 9 at the lug there...someone's going to get damn confused telling the time with that ticker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,653 Posts
I believe that you would've been better served with a custom dial or a conversion based on a hunter case movement. I do like the see thru back but a custom dial with the sub seconds at 9 and crown at 3 would give it an vintage Flieger look. I am currently having a, 0 size Model 1900 Hunter Case Waltham, fitted to a vintage silver cushion case. Some ham handed watchmaker had ruined the original movement beyond economic repair. It'll be a very attractive watch I've seen the movement fitted to the the case but it still needed the stem tube, stem and crown.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,244 Posts
A great way of saving an orphaned movement!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,244 Posts
I think this butchering is going on all the time. Only us enthusiasts would never do it.
Sadly, soon we will not see many gold cased PW `anymore.
 

·
Moderator Public Forum
Joined
·
22,090 Posts
I hunt/collect pocket watches of many types. Some I collect, some I re-sell. This summer I found this 1940ish Hamilton 12s 21jewel Hamilton. The open case was 14k and although I like to think that most watches I sell will not get scrapped for the metal content, I always realize that possibility in the back of my mind.

Well, this one was sold over the summer and just recently I was browsing Hamilton on eBay when a seller name caught my eye. Sure enough, his name was in my feedback attached to the Hamilton I sold. I was currently looking at a wristwatch with a tricked out 921 movement. It was all skeletonized, and vintage which caught my eye. I liked the watch first. Secondly, I couldn't help but compare the serial number on the movement to the one I sold him. A match! I really don't like the idea of scrapping cases, but I'm sure that's what happened in this case.

However, the end result was quite nice... and it was the movement I found... and I liked how it looked. The seller turned out to be a good watchmaker. And he did an excellent job. I wear the watch daily. It just occurred to me you all might find the story and pix interesting. Any similar experiences?
I'm glad to see that the next buyer got some use out of that movement. While the display back gives a nice view of an attractive movement I can't be complimentary about the dial. The inner bezel looks like a movement spacer flipped and marked for timekeeping. The dial side of the movement should have been either skeletonized to show the gear train or covered up with something attractive. The result looks hacked together up to me. Having the seconds hand at 9:00 is ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,651 Posts
I think this butchering is going on all the time. Only us enthusiasts would never do it.
Sadly, soon we will not see many gold cased PW `anymore.
Hi -

Sadly, all too true. The price of gold means that there will be a lot of orphaned movements out there, some may actually be sold (as opposed to remaindered for parts).

The price differential of functioning gold-cased PW and PW movement + lots of cash is simply too large right now. This is also the case (no pun intended) for vintage jewelry and gold coins: my wife has several of the latter, and it is increasingly tempting to sell for the gold content, as you can get the money immediately, rather than selling it as a gold coin of numismatic value.

Expect this to continue until we have more stable economic development and people are no longer worried about the economy and their jobs...

JohnF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
As I said initially, I choose not to break up watches... but I do need to sell them occasionally.It's just the way it is and I can't exactly have my buyers sign a "appropriate use" agreement. In any case, I was simply happy to rescue the watch (purely by chance). THAT was the story here... happy ending despite the cruel butchering of yet another watch. I would personally never buy a vintage watch and purposefully make a "project" out of it for a wrist watch. But it happened all the same, and I was happy to rescue the dismembered movement for my wrist. Maybe the movement will find some happiness knowing it at least will have a future... despite it's tragic past.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top