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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello there,

As for a little introduction, I'm a french Seiko vintages collector. I've learned, reading forums, the "art of customization" and then started to restore vintages (case, crystal, dial & hands).
Then I've decided to follow some basic watchmaking course in order to learn how to service my watches. I'm starting to feel confident with basic manual winding date movements, next (and last for now) course will introduce automatic and day/date.

So in order to practice, I started to check on flee markets for old watches, working condition or not. Last week, I've been able to source 3 watches for less than $30 (all 3). One Orient "TV", one random swiss/french auto and a "Diamant 17 Rubis" diver:



As the "Diamant" was a manual winding one, it naturally becomes the next candidate. The french texts on the dial (diamant & rubis instead of diamond & jewels) was obviously a sign of another swiss/french movement based watch but ...
I've discovered a Poljot 2614B under the case !



The movement is now ready to be cleaned up, and then remounted/oiled:



Could someone provides me with more information about the "Diamant" brand ?

I also have "in stock" a couple of non working Poljot Signal and I'd like to be able to rebuild one from the 2, but this is another step further in term of complication, and another story :)

Have a nice week-end !

Olivier
 

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I can't help you with the watch but I'm interested in the course you did. Was it one you had to attend, or a DVD, or a book set perhaps?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello,

It was an individual course given here in France by a "amateur" who lived in Switzerland for 25 years learning from notable watchmakers and now giving courses and restoring/repairing vintages.
First course was based on ETA 6498 (36mm small second manual), un-boxing the watch parts, dismantling and understanding the movement, cleaning and "clean" remounting without touching the pieces and oiling with 4 types (grease and 3 oils) including antichocs.
And then regulation using a timegrapher and re-boxing, but as it was individual course and as I was already confident with this part we've been deeper in oiling and regulation.

Next course will be the same without the casing part but based on an ETA 2824 (25mm automatic + date).

Then I think I'll have bases solid enough to discover by myself ... maybe I'll be able to service a chronograph in some years :) !
 

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Thanks and best wishes to your future in Horology! My late father was a watchmaker and I just wish he could have passed on his skill before he passed away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks and best wishes to your future in Horology! My late father was a watchmaker and I just wish he could have passed on his skill before he passed away.
Well, it's never to late to learn (but yes, you may need some funds to assure a solid jumpstart) !
I did my university in micromechanics and engineering but I've nearly always worked in IT (better salary and career opportunities).
It's like turning my first job into an hobby, 20 years after, without all the inconveniences related to a job !
 

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Belokan,

I think you have done extremely well for your $30; and as far as I am concerned, finding a Russian movement under the hood of a non-Russian watch is always a most pleasant surprise, as it is the discovery of another brand employing Russian movements. Besides, the Diamant is pretty enough to be a daily wearer, good enough to stand on its own merits, having a movement by the grand house of Poljot certainly helps a lot too! If you chance upon other Diamant-brand watches, it is worth checking to see if it has Russian movements too: the lack of markings proclaiming to be Swiss might be a start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you chance upon other Diamant-brand watches, it is worth checking to see if it has Russian movements too: the lack of markings proclaiming to be Swiss might be a start.
Hello Seele,

I've been digging around on french forums and it appears that all Diamant watches (with a visible movement) are Poljot based:









Have a nice Sunday !

Olivier
 

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Belokan,

Thanks for making the effort digging around! The first picture of the pocket watch shows a Molnija, not Poljot, so it seems possible that Diamant was a distributor who bought watches from the Russian manufacturers, branded accordingly for sale in France, and had some specially built using Russian movements with case parts sourced elsewhere.
 

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Belokan,

Thanks for making the effort digging around! The first picture of the pocket watch shows a Molnija, not Poljot, so it seems possible that Diamant was a distributor who bought watches from the Russian manufacturers, branded accordingly for sale in France, and had some specially built using Russian movements with case parts sourced elsewhere.
Looks to be like a Molnija 3602 like seen in the railroad pocket watch?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
And here is she !
I've lost a winding wheel (I guess I will loose a case next time ...) so I need to open the back to wind it but I'm waiting for spare parts form the bay.
Anyway, it's working quite fine (been able to more or less set it to +30s/d which is not bad regarding the conception so far), cleaned, oiled and buffed:





Next (Russian) project will be a Poljot Signal ... But I'll first have to work on a spare movement to discover the alarm module :)

Have a nice Sunday !
 

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Lost winding wheel notwithstanding you have a great watch worth a fair bit of wrist time; in fact it's something I would not mind wearing at all, even the outside is not Poljot.
 

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If you chance upon other Diamant-brand watches, it is worth checking to see if it has Russian movements too: the lack of markings proclaiming to be Swiss might be a start.
Recently, I have come across a Diamant watch although it is in poor condition. The thing that intrigued me about it was how similar it was to a Sekonda that I have. When I looked closer, I saw USSR at the foot of the dial. I assumed it to be the same movement. Putting them side by side, I discovered that the Diamant was slightly larger than the Sekonda. Opening the Diamant I discovered a Poljot 2616 Automatic movement although the rotor had snapped at its pinion. For this reason it took me a while to identify the factory. The Sekonda is a standard 17 Jewel 2609. Both watches have very similar dials and identical hands. The size of the Diamant's watch case is slightly larger than the Sekonda to accommodate the movement but the design of the case is very similar. The Diamant also has a Soviet watch factory gasket which leads me to think the watchcase, dial and movement are all USSR made. It is not just a case of a USSR movement in someone elses watchcase.

As it is in such poor condition having suffered moisture damage at some point (although it still works), it will remain a curiosity in my collection.

Diamant 2616 vs Sekonda 2609

Dial.JPG
Case.JPG


Diamant 2.JPG Sekonda.JPG

Case profile
Profile.JPG

USSR on both dials

Diamant
Diamant USSR.JPG

Sekonda
Sekonda USSR.JPG
 
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