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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
:think:

I just won an ebay auction for a vintage Bulova. My first vintage piece.

Here it is:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEBTOX:IT&item=150190073861&_trksid=p3984.cTODAY.m238.lVI


Some questions:

1) Is it from 1952? On the 7th photo below, the inscription is L2 on the movement.

2) Is this considered a higher quality watch? Swiss made?

3) How often should I wind it and should be very careful of over winding? About 20 winds per winding?

4) Anyone know the original approximate retail price when this watch first came out?

5) How do I open the rear lid?

Also, any comments are welcome.
 

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1) Yes, the watch is from 1952. L2 is the Bulova code for 1952

2) Bulova was a middle tier manufacturer. This particular watch can be considered Swiss made but Bulova was a Swiss/American company.

3) This is an automatic watch which will keep itself wound if worn. It should be started out by manually fully winding it (~50 turns of the crown clockwise). It is impossible to overwind an automatic watch (or any watch for that matter - a manual watch will stop winding when fully wound, that is, the crown won't turn anymore with finger pressure). There is no such thing as "overwinding" a watch. If some one says a watch has been "overwound" they don't know what they are talking about. There are watches that are fully wound but do not run but this is because the wheel train or escapement has some blockage (broken pivot, lubrication turned to glue, etc.).

4) When new the watch probably sold for around $50-75 (just a guess).

5) You need a case wrench to open the screw-on back of this watch.

Some advice:

The seller says the watch was not serviced by them and it probably hasn't been serviced at all in years. If you expect it to keep reliable time and run without problems then get it serviced before regular wear.

Unless you have the watch serviced and checked for water resistance treat this watch as if it isn't water proof at all (which is almost certainly isn't after 55 years).
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thank you. I will have it servised as soon as it arrives. i will ask them to check for water resistance too.

Also, can anyone recommend a type of case wrench to use? Any particular product?
 

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There really is no need to open the back of the watch unless you are servicing it, so I'd advise you to take it in to a watchmaker for cleaning. He/she can open the case for you so you don't mess up the back with a slippery case wrench.
You can have a look at the movement at that time. It's not an exceptionally interesting one, although it's a good quality movement.
Don't even THINK about wearing a 50+ year old watch around water, even if it does claim to be water resistant. It is just good common sense to leave it off your wrist when washing the car, etc.
 
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