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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The original title was "Men and the Art of Solar Watch Maintenance," but the editor nixed it in favor of a more SEO-friendly title. :geek:

Here it is!


Thanks to @Sir-Guy and @judg69 for their photographic contributions!
 

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Nice write up! The photos were especially educational. I liked your bit about wintertime, long sleeves, etc. in the sense that with a rotation not everyone can ensure lots of sunlight.

And I’d wager that many solar watch owners don’t have big rotations. In that sense, there are probably plenty of solar watch owners who don’t get that their watches have rechargeable cells and don’t simply die as soon as it’s dark. (We’ve had at least one new member here asking that, actually!)

A little friendly education goes a long way. By the way, should you ever need another GW-M5610 photo, feel free to use this one. I snapped it at the second everything lined up to match promotional materials.



I’m sure you’ve noticed that the PRW-50 we both have doesn’t even bother with a charge display on the main timekeeping display. In fact, as far as I know, there’s no way on that module to keep it on...you can only see it momentarily when returning to timekeeping mode. So they seem to be acknowledging that for many wearers of that one, it’s not a critical thing to obsess over.

I’ll add that windowsill or lamp techniques aside, every solar watch I’ve gotten (that has a power reserve indicator) was either already H, or if M, back at H within a day. So they charge up much faster than they go down. A little goes a long way!

I’m just rambling now. Carry on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
And I’d wager that many solar watch owners don’t have big rotations. In that sense, there are probably plenty of solar watch owners who don’t get that their watches have rechargeable cells and don’t simply die as soon as it’s dark. (We’ve had at least one new member here asking that, actually!)
Yes... if you have one solar watch, and you wear it often... it's simply not an issue at all.

I snapped it at the second everything lined up to match promotional materials.
You have achieved "nerdvana!" LOL

I’m sure you’ve noticed that the PRW-50 we both have doesn’t even bother with a charge display on the main timekeeping display. In fact, as far as I know, there’s no way on that module to keep it on...you can only see it momentarily when returning to timekeeping mode. So they seem to be acknowledging that for many wearers of that one, it’s not a critical thing to obsess over.
Yep. Though some conflate "obsession" with a simple interest (or even enthusiasm) in this facet of the hobby.


I’ll add that windowsill or lamp techniques aside, every solar watch I’ve gotten (that has a power reserve indicator) was either already H, or if M, back at H within a day. So they charge up much faster than they go down. A little goes a long way!
It's easier to maintain "H" (and better for the battery) than it is to bring it up from dead or "L" to "H." I think that's where some newbies get worried... it's "taking too long" to get from dead or "L" to "H."
 

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Wow, I guess I never really worried about my solars that much. I guess I’ve been lucky with them holding a charge? I have been rotating them in groups of two in the fall months over the course of the last few years. Most of the time they’re all still on H to begin with, but I do it just to get them ready for the winter. Other than my MTG, which seems to dip down a bit here and there, mine all remain on high with little to no effort other than a sporadic wear and the perennial autumnal sun bath I mentioned earlier. Anyway, G Shock charging methods cannot be the same for everyone because of geography, climate, and window positions, and I can see how that gizmo would be particularly beneficial if you lived in Seattle or as you said the UK.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow, I guess I never really worried about my solars that much. I guess I’ve been lucky with them holding a charge? I have been rotating them in groups of two in the fall months over the course of the last few years. Most of the time they’re all still on H to begin with, but I do it just to get them ready for the winter. Other than my MTG, which seems to dip down a bit here and there, mine all remain on high with little to no effort other than a sporadic wear and the perennial autumnal sun bath I mentioned earlier. Anyway, G Shock charging methods cannot be the same for everyone because of geography, climate, and window positions, and I can see how that gizmo would be particularly beneficial if you lived in Seattle or as you said the UK.
I'm certainly not "worried" one bit. I have other... real... worries in life. Though there are many threads by newbies that seem to be "worried" about whether their solar watches are functioning (charging) properly. And, those threads always precipitate some rancorous debates on the "best" way to keep solar watches charged up.

I live in Florida, which is the helio-climatic polar opposite of the UK. But, if I put my watches outside, they would get very hot, very quickly. Super-hot! That's not to mention having to babysit them for fear of them "walking off." By design, our house has little to no southern window exposure... and my other windows don't have convenient furniture surfaces upon which to rest my watches or watch boxes.

I could take them out of the box and put them on the window sill. But, that would require me to DO something. With my set-up, I do absolutely nothing. I don't have to move the herd to graze. I only have to decide which watch to wear for the day.
 

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I'm certainly not "worried" one bit. I have other... real... worries in life. Though there are many threads by newbies that seem to be "worried" about whether their solar watches are functioning (charging) properly. And, those threads always precipitate some rancorous debates on the "best" way to keep solar watches charged up.

I live in Florida, which is the helio-climatic polar opposite of the UK. But, if I put my watches outside, they would get very hot, very quickly. Super-hot! That's not to mention having to babysit them for fear of them "walking off." By design, our house has little to no southern window exposure... and my other windows don't have convenient furniture surfaces upon which to rest my watches or watch boxes.

I could take them out of the box and put them on the window sill. But, that would require me to DO something. With my set-up, I do absolutely nothing. I don't have to move the herd to graze. I only have to decide which watch to wear for the day.
By “worries” I wasn’t trying to be facetious, I just meant that you charge them 3 times a week on your “farm”. You’re right, it doesn’t take much effort to flip a switch on your part, but I guess I never felt that kind of attentiveness was necessary. I was actually a bit surprised by the measurements. I actually assumed any artificial light source would be SIGNIFICANTLY lower, but that doesn’t necessarily seem to be the case.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
By “worries” I wasn’t trying to be facetious, I just meant that you charge them 3 times a week on your “farm”. You’re right, it doesn’t take much effort to flip a switch on your part
Nope. I don't even have to do that. It's on a timer. I don't do anything.... at all. This was mentioned in the article.

15538679


I was actually a bit surprised by the measurements. I actually assumed any artificial light source would be SIGNIFICANTLY lower, but that doesn’t necessarily seem to be the case.
Surprised me, as well! But, it should be noted that distance from the source (of artificial) light makes a big difference. As distance increases, lux drops off exponentially.
 

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. . .
Surprised me, as well! But, it should be noted that distance from the source (of artificial) light makes a big difference. As distance increases, lux drops off exponentially.
Yes, the distance from the light is critical, as shown in your photos. I have a Carex lamp similar to yours & the recommended usage distance is 1 foot away, which is where the 10,000 lux (at the highest setting) rating comes from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have a Carex lamp similar to yours & the recommended usage distance is 1 foot away, which is where the 10,000 lux (at the highest setting) rating comes from.
I just measured. My watches are 7 inches away from the light. I got a 24,100 lux measurement there (as shown in article).
 

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I just measured. My watches are 7 inches away from the light. I got a 24,100 lux measurement there (as shown in article).
Exactly, I'm guessing if you moved the meter another 5 inches away from the light, the reading would drop closer to the lamp's rated 10,000 lux.

For some reason, I had never thought of using my Carex to charge my solar watches, so your article has inspired me to consider placing some of them near me when I charge my biological clock during the winter!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I only have four but I put them all in one flower pot, on the sill in the sunlight. I water them regularly but beyond that I let nature take its course. At the moment they are all growing tall in an attempt to out shadow each other but I think the PRG 600 is going to win
"Jack and the G-Stalk?" 🤭
 
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